Leap Manifesto: 'A Call For A Canada Based on Caring For the Earth and One Another'

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swallow swallow's picture

Pondering, the truth and reconciliation report is not for indigenous peoples alone. It's for you. And me. And all settlers & descendants of settlers. And all treaty pepole. Which is all of us. 

quizzical

Pondering wrote:
quizzical wrote:
Pondering wrote:
It's a real shame the Leap manifesto isn't presented in a manner that would appeal to the 99%.

Opening with a focus on indigenous people immediately sets it up as something that is for them, less than 5% of the population, rather than for all Canadians.

uh the less than 5% of Canadian population you refer to so distainfully actually owns this country. all of it.

this i your absolute worst post ever. it's racist classist and condescending. i have some choice names for you. but i'll refrain and just call you  a piece of work.

Do you want to win or just be right? I think winning is better.

i don't believe the end justifys the means.

i do believe words need to meet people where they're at, not where you want them to be.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture


Mount Sentinel Secondary School's Green Team is kicking off a campaign to encourage meaningful action from our new federal leaders at the Paris Climate Conference next month. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

To the my fellow Canadians,

Statistics show that by 2017 climate change will reach such a drastic point that there would be no return. We need to act now, and what better way to motivate our country's leader into action than to show him how passionate the youth of the our country are.

As of Oct. 30th 2015 the Mt.Sentinel Green Team, an action oriented group of students, designed poster to be sent to our Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau. This poster would act as a message to alert Trudeau of our need for action against climate change, and that student bodies wish to work with him. The purpose of this letter is to ask other schools to join our cause. Our endgame is to have the schools across Canada draw Trudeau’s attention to our need for change.

We ask that should you receive this letter you forward it and the attached link (containing the plan format and instructions) to all your social media accounts and platforms (other schools, board offices, superintendents). It would then be up to the discretion of each school if they wish to participate or not. Should they wish to participate the attached link would contain the steps necessary.

Sincerely,
Mt.Sentinel Green Team students.

Pondering

swallow wrote:
Pondering, the truth and reconciliation report is not for indigenous peoples alone. It's for you. And me. And all settlers & descendants of settlers. And all treaty pepole. Which is all of us.

Implementing the provisions of that report is already planned so if that's the goal of the Leap Manifesto it's a done deal, all they have to do is pressure Trudeau to keep his word. No big manifesto needed.

T&R may apply to everyone but that doesn't mean it motivates everyone, certainly not to do anything drastic.

It seems to me that is not the primary goal of the Leap Manifesto.

Rather, it posits that a radical change in direction towards transitioning to the use of renewables is urgent and that we have to stop using oil and other fossil fuels as quickly as possible and that the money exists to do it.

Anyone who has been taught how to write a five paragraph essay understands that the first paragraph has to tell the reader the main points that will be covered. The next three paragraphs support those points and the last paragraph sums up the argument. That extends to longer reports too.

It seems to be aimed at the already converted.

swallow swallow's picture

Oh, don't get me started on the 5 paragraph essay! The most appalling form of writing known to humanity. ;) 

It seems to me that stylistically they adopted the hook of a journalist writing a feature piece (Naomi Klein's oeuvre) - open with a catchy hook linked to current events - and at the time of writing, TRC was top of the headlines. Then draw the interested reader into the rest of the text. 

But do we have to bog down on stylistic presentation? I'm sure the people behind the manifesto would be delighted if others took up its key points, reframed them, and pushed them forward in a variety of writing styles. It's supposed to be about change, and anything that advances the change that's needed is in the spirit of the manifesto, yes? 

Slumberjack

I do notice that plenty of speech from the left gets tagged as a 'manifesto,' when it isn't being referred to as an agenda.  Yeah we're loaded up with agenda here.

eastnoireast

swallow wrote:

Oh, don't get me started on the 5 paragraph essay! The most appalling form of writing known to humanity. ;) 

 

appalling, yet effective.

Pondering

swallow wrote:
But do we have to bog down on stylistic presentation? I'm sure the people behind the manifesto would be delighted if others took up its key points, reframed them, and pushed them forward in a variety of writing styles. It's supposed to be about change, and anything that advances the change that's needed is in the spirit of the manifesto, yes?

Perhaps, but it seems like the Leap people feel there is some urgency involved and are trying to spark a mass movement not just share their philosophy. They have resources that others don't.

swallow wrote:
Oh, don't get me started on the 5 paragraph essay! The most appalling form of writing known to humanity. ;) 

It seems to me that stylistically they adopted the hook of a journalist writing a feature piece (Naomi Klein's oeuvre) - open with a catchy hook linked to current events - and at the time of writing, TRC was top of the headlines. Then draw the interested reader into the rest of the text.

That sounds right. Journalists have a limited audience, the type of people who are interested in the topic they are writing about.

Slumberjack is right, the world "manifesto" is a trigger. Might as well say radical arty/hippie type plan.

Job seekers are advised to write their resume with the company they are applying to in mind. It isn't being dishonest to tailor an appeal to an audience unless you are being deliberately deceptive.

 

swallow swallow's picture

Ironically, all parties in the UK run on "manifestos" 

KenS

Agreed that here Manifesto sounds inherently radical.

I think the choice was deliberate. At least in getting started, your audience is not everyone / as broad a reach as possible.

It is reaching out to an established already defined constituency.

The message is that it is both the time [need] and the opportunity to get moving. Mobilize the people who already have a good enough idea of what they want and what they want to do. 

 

And remember that they issued the manifesto into the middle of the campaign. As far as they knew, the NDP might do well, even win. But it was understood that would be woefully inadequate. Let alone it ends up being the Liberals.   As far as the Manifesto goes, all the same really.

But they were positioning themselves to be ready to take on a successful NDP.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Written by Avi Lewis Naomi Klein

quote:

But these victories are not enough. People power can stop big dirty projects and start small clean ones. But for a true transition—on the scale and with the urgency that climate science demands—we need policies.  Big, bold, ambitious policies that can transform our economies on a deadline. And we need them at every level of government, from municipal to national to international.

To get there, throwing out fossil fuel-addicted governments won’t be enough. Even electing progressive leaders won’t be enough. It will take a combination of electoral change and pressure (as well as vision) from below to disperse the smog of Big Carbon’s influence that shrouds our political systems.

And that means we need policies that will galvanize huge numbers of people—people who see direct benefits in advocating such transformative change. That’s the only way we will build the massive constituencies necessary to exert sufficient pressure on governments.

All of this is why, in anticipation of our recent change in government, we helped launch The Leap Manifesto in Canada. Written and endorsed by a broad spectrum of social movements—from First Nations and green groups, migrant rights and anti-poverty campaigners, big labor and small business—The Leap is a set of policy demands that could get us off fossil fuels and shift us to an economy based on caring for the earth and each other. It’s a vision of our country that we think has mass appeal.

It calls for massive new public investments in low-carbon housing and transit, no new fossil fuel infrastructure, a shift to 100% renewable energy for electricity in two decades (which dozens of Canadian experts have said is entirely doable) and a totally clean economy by 2050.

iyraste1313

I must differ! This focus on green economy that is a technical fix away from fossil fuels, by itself is totally inadequate.

The problem fundamentally is a corporate economy built on centralized technologies and financed by a totally parasitical capitalist scam system.

The heavy capital cost polluters, the fracking and tar sands are dead in the water, as the commodity bubbles have burst and the pricing cannot sustain their survival...though of course I will not discourage any movement to stop them, especially as corporate governments will try to increase their subsidies as too big to fail institutions!

It is the system! Which guarantees a continued failure of the economy, continued real estate assets bubbling and increasing divide between the elites and the rest.

A movement to be successful will have to focus on the finances, the corporate control, globalization which has destroyed any semblance of a natural economy. Green fixes by themselves will do nothing to stop the growing concentrations of power and elie control over all forms of governance.

Secondly green fixes are a longer term. No we need immediate solutions...as the contradictions of capitalism continue to accelerate.

Very soon, the Chinese financial bubbles will implode, drastically reducing the global economies...talking about far off future green energy projects will not talk to people!

No Society must be reconstituted. Rural econoy must be supported...it's not just fossil fuels...its highly centralized logging and processing, its mining, its the entire superstructure of overbloated management systems...no we need concepts such as worker managed cooperative smaller scale bioregional industry and natural agricultural systems.....it's not just fossil fuel energy, its fossil fuel agriculture, its centralized container trucking...no this manifesto is way too restrictive....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

iyraste

..i don't disagree with some of the things you are saying but first and formost you need people demanding change. nothing will bring people forward like life, air and water being threatened. this is they way in which all issues can be encompassed.

And that means we need policies that will galvanize huge numbers of people—people who see direct benefits in advocating such transformative change. That’s the only way we will build the massive constituencies necessary to exert sufficient pressure on governments.

iyraste1313

"nothing will bring people forward like life, air and water being threatened"

I of course totally agree with your basic thrust...one problem of course is that in canada we are coralled into the cities, leaving just the few and the Indigenous to fight off the threats to such....In the cities...it will take homelessness and starvation, which is coming, no doubt!
You can't be reading the esential numbers without know this!

We need to build movements to get people onto the land...this is the heart of the resistance, the heart of a productive alternative!

We need to take the rural towns and villages especially supporting the Indigenous villages!

We need to build linkages...the rural areas with the community urban neighbourhoods...and above all linkages with the resistance movements globally!

Climate change as the galvinizer...not unless there are soon to be some dramatic changes, like freezing temperatures this winter on the Atlantic what with the collapse of the Greenland glaciers?

But what is eseential is to build mass movements around system change! We need to be talking about visionary system and how to rescue ourselves from the nightmare we are facing!

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..and here lies the differences i see between us iyraste. though on a smaller scale than what is needed i see most of what you are talking about as already going on. all this can be seen in the the pipeline/climate/que threads. lack of proper nutrition and homelessness has been going on for some time but not starvation. the lack of snow around vancouver over the winter leading to water shortages and the ragging fires that occured over the summer has alarmed many folk. this is recognized as climate change and a real threat. and system change is exactly what we are talking about when we talk about the leap..without the rhetoric.

NDPP

Extinction, the New Environmentalism and the Cancer in the Wilderness

http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/10/30/extinction-the-new-environmentali...

"The word is in from the wildlife biologists. Say goodbye in North America to the gray wolf, the cougar, the grizzly bear. They are destined for extinction sometime in the next 40 years...Between 30 and 50 percent of all known species are expected to go extinct by 2050..."

Defend Mother Earth Now!

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Defend Mother Earth Now!

The last permissible gendered role.

Some scienticians actively promote the idea that Earth is a big ball of ROCK.  But others know She's a beautiful, caring, loving woman.

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture
NDPP

Eco-Apocalypse: Indonesia is Burning. So Why is the World Looking Away?   -   by George Monbiot

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article43301.htm

"A great tract of the Earth is on fire. It is almost certainly the greatest environmental disaster of the 21st century - so far..."

MegB

Pondering wrote:

It's a real shame the Leap manifesto isn't presented in a manner that would appeal to the 99%.

Opening with a focus on indigenous people immediately sets it up as something that is for them, less than 5% of the population, rather than for all Canadians. 

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has acknowledged shocking details about the violence of Canada’s near past. Deepening poverty and inequality are a scar on the country’s present. And Canada’s record on climate change is a crime against humanity’s future.

These facts are all the more jarring because they depart so dramatically from our stated values: respect for Indigenous rights, internationalism, human rights, diversity, and environmental stewardship.

We could live in a country powered entirely by renewable energy, woven together by accessible public transit, in which the jobs and opportunities of this transition are designed to systematically eliminate racial and gender inequality. Caring for one another and caring for the planet could be the economy’s fastest growing sectors. Many more people could have higher wage jobs with fewer work hours, leaving us ample time to enjoy our loved ones and flourish in our communities.

We know that the time for this great transition is short. Climate scientists have told us that this is the decade to take decisive action to prevent catastrophic global warming. That means small steps will no longer get us where we need to go.This leap must begin by respecting the inherent rights and title of the original caretakers of this land. Indigenouscommunities have been at the forefront of protecting rivers, coasts, forests and lands from out-of-control industrial activity. We can bolster this role, and reset our relationship, by fully implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

All true, but the second paragraph seems intended to convince us that if only were fair to indigenous peoples all would be right with the world.

The Leap manifesto isn't wrong, it's just designed to fail. It is evangelical and comes across as promoting some sort of future utopia.

It loses the majority long before getting here: How we can pay for all of this? Read “We Can Afford The Leap” by Bruce Campbell, Seth Klein, and Marc Lee

The first question should always be who are you trying to convince and what are their primary interests or strongest motivation factors?

Indigenous peoples are the most successful advocates for climate justice and defense of the land so of course they would be front and centre for the Leap Manifesto. To suggest that this would be of no appeal to the 99% is, frankly, racist.

lagatta

I'm amazed and thrilled about the uptake in mobilizing on Indigenous issues for example at the World March of Women event here in Trois-Rivières and subsequent actions in Montréal and elsewhere.

We have to point out that these actions are necessary, and that they won't make our lives unpleasant; not taking them will.

MegB

lagatta wrote:

I'm amazed and thrilled about the uptake in mobilizing on Indigenous issues for example at the World March of Women event here in Trois-Rivières and subsequent actions in Montréal and elsewhere.

We have to point out that these actions are necessary, and that they won't make our lives unpleasant; not taking them will.

I'm feeling kind of optimistic these days.

swallow swallow's picture

Monbiot points out that Indoensia is currently leading the US on greenhouse gas emissions. These are not jsut random forest fires, they are the result of capitalist extraction run amok. 

Time to start looking at the effect of palm oil plantations in Southeast Asia? If so, it will take alliances with indigenous forest peoples in Indonesia. 

NDPP

Naomi Klein, Stephen Lewis, Paul Moist To Headline Climate Change Rally Supporting LEAP Manifesto Vision in Lead Up To Paris Climate Summit

http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/naomi-klein-stephen-lewis-paul-...

"National unions, First Nations, environmental, social justice and youth groups will join together at Jack Poole Plaza in Vancouver at noon on Nov 5 to demand action on climate change that creates jobs, justice and sustainable communities..."

Pondering

MegB wrote:
Indigenous peoples are the most successful advocates for climate justice and defense of the land so of course they would be front and centre for the Leap Manifesto. To suggest that this would be of no appeal to the 99% is, frankly, racist.

What evidence do you have that the 99% cares so much about the plight of indigenous peoples?

Given conditions on reserves I think my evidence that concern for indigeneous people is not a top motivator is stronger.

What is the goal of the Leap Manifesto? To convince us that indigenous peoples live in harmony with the land so we should copy them? That they are superior to us? Given conditions on reserves you will have a difficult time proving that argument. It also smacks of the racist "noble savage" myth.

This leap must begin by respecting the inherent rights and title of the original caretakers of this land.

Okay then, this "Leap" is all about promoting treaty rights.

Indigenous communities have been at the forefront of protecting rivers, coasts, forests and lands from out-of-control industrial activity.

So have many other groups, and the Leap Manifesto was not created by indigenous peoples.

Moved by the treaties that form the legal basis of this country and bind us to share the land “for as long as the sun shines, the grass grows and the rivers flow,” we want energy sources that will last for time immemorial and never run out or poison the land.

Very flowery but I am not at all moved by the treaties. They are legal documents/agreements that should be honored. Nothing more and nothing less.

Technological breakthroughs have brought this dream within reach. The latest research shows it is feasible for Canada to get 100% of its electricity from renewable resources within two decades[1]; by 2050 we could have a 100% clean economy[2].

My desire for a clean economy has nothing at all to do with indigenous peoples. The barriers to 100% renewable energy are cost and the entrenched interests of oil companies. With the cost of renewables coming down and the environmental cost of dirty energy going up it has now become feasible to transition to renewables.

The Truth and Reconcilliation recommendations should be followed because it is the only path forward to partially atoning for what we have done to indigenous peoples and creating conditions in which they can flourish for their own good but also for the good of the country.

This goal:

https://leapmanifesto.org/en/faq/

Whoever forms the next government, we hope that The Leap will have been discussed and debated enough during the campaign, and been supported or signed by a significant enough number of Canadians, that it will be impossible for Parliament to ignore. If Canada ends up with a coalition government, made up of various opposition parties, we think the vision outlined in The Leap could become a significant factor shaping the coalition’s agenda.

was not met. Not even close. For a supposedly non-partisan proposal they spend a lot of time talking about the election. The Manifesto is already out of date.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

pondering

..your divisive language is inappropriate and doesn't match your desire for a cleaner economy.

Thin Red Line Won't Hold Without You - Grand Chief Stewart Phillip on Fracking & LNG

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip describes how devastating hydraulic fracturing to extract gas in BC is for wildlife, indigenous people, and our global climate. He calls on everyone, indigenous and non-indigenous to step up to stop fracking and other destructive industrial projects that threaten the very future of human society.

Filmed at the KAIROS Fracking Forum in Vancouver BC, Coast Salish Territories, on October 31, 2015. More video, including the presentation by Caleb Behn that Phillip refers to, is available from www.kairoscanada.org/what-we-do/ecologic­al-justice/fracking-forum-watc...

swallow swallow's picture

I dare say the 99% has more than one opinion on indigenous rights. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from the kairos forum. talking about consultation on the east coast but also the support coming from outside eg unions

A Call Out - IMW Consultation Delegation - Iapjiw Maliaptasiktitiew Wskwitqamu

Pondering

epaulo13 wrote:

pondering

..your divisive language is inappropriate and doesn't match your desire for a cleaner economy.

Thin Red Line Won't Hold Without You - Grand Chief Stewart Phillip on Fracking & LNG

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip describes how devastating hydraulic fracturing to extract gas in BC is for wildlife, indigenous people, and our global climate. He calls on everyone, indigenous and non-indigenous to step up to stop fracking and other destructive industrial projects that threaten the very future of human society.

Filmed at the KAIROS Fracking Forum in Vancouver BC, Coast Salish Territories, on October 31, 2015. More video, including the presentation by Caleb Behn that Phillip refers to, is available from www.kairoscanada.org/what-we-do/ecologic­al-justice/fracking-forum-watc...

I'm not claiming that indigenous people haven't played a large part in environmental protection. I am claiming that indigenous peoples are not a driving motivator of the majority of Canadians. How is it divisive to recognize the truth?

If the Leap manifesto is intended to be a thank-you to indigenous peoples, or a plea for the treaties to be honored, then it's a great Manifesto. If the Leap manifesto is intended to convince mainstream Canadians that a clean economy is within our reach and  will benefit us all then it's a failure.

 

The right wing learned how to use marketing techniques to sell neoliberalism. They finessed swift-boating. Many factors impacted Trudeau's win, but it was primarily a great highly strategic marketing plan that put him where he is today.

To a certain extent appealing to people's better angels does work but it has its limits.

Massive mainstream support is required for "the Leap" to actually occur. Creating conditions for the Leap to occur will take smart marketing either deliberate or accidental.

 

NDPP

And since Canada loves BIG NUKE too, and since the poisons from this are now washing up and down the West Coast and raining down on us as well,  I'll put this here as a reminder how critical it is to make a start RIGHT FUCKING NOW winding this crazy capitalist planetary death-machine down..

Fukushima Gets A Lot Uglier

http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/11/03/fukushima-gets-a-lot-uglier/

"As it unfolds, the Fukushima story grows more convoluted and way more chilling. What could be worse? Keep reading."

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

pondering

..we can’t talk about about a clean economy without talking about colonization. here in the territory called canada we are colonized by by corporations, by banks, by elites, by global capital and by the us military who pose a constant threat of invasion.  

..who has born the brunt of this colonization has been the first people. and this goes back to the beginning when european nations began their quest for control. this is why it is important to put the struggles in the forefront of the movements for change. to begin the process of decolonization in earnest as it is tied to the success of the leap for change.

..what has come before us in our relationship to the first people was/is based on fear, ignorance, racism and lies from our governments. in spite of this for many years polls have said that canadians want the issues with the 1st people settled in a respectful manner. this has never been accepted by our governments. and now it will be addressed. 

Pondering

epaulo13 wrote:

pondering

..we can’t talk about about a clean economy without talking about colonization. here in the territory called canada we are colonized by by corporations, by banks, by elites, by global capital and by the us military who pose a constant threat of invasion.  

..who has born the brunt of this colonization has been the first people. and this goes back to the beginning when european nations began their quest for control. this is why it is important to put the struggles in the forefront of the movements for change. to begin the process of decolonization in earnest as it is tied to the success of the leap for change.

..what has come before us in our relationship to the first people was/is based on fear, ignorance, racism and lies from our governments. in spite of this for many years polls have said that canadians want the issues with the 1st people settled in a respectful manner. this has never been accepted by our governments. and now it will be addressed. 

Yes they do, as long as it doesn't cost them too much. I'm sure most don't want food banks in Canada either but not enough to take to the streets.

Hundreds are expected to gather at Jack Poole Plaza to rally to support the Leap Manifesto, a declaration released in mid-September that calls on the Canadian government to honour Indigenous rights, reinvest in the public sphere and move toward a clean and just economy fuelled by renewable energy.

For the Leap to happen it needs support from hundreds of thousands of people, not just hundreds or even thousands. Hundreds of thousands if not millions in every major city.

If the Leap is intended to be for activists then I take it back. It's perfect.

The premise of the Leap manifesto seems to be that we need to change direction rapidly transitioning to a green economy and that it is economically feasible to do so. Any other course of action and catastrophe becomes unavoidable so this needs to happen ASAP.

The most important reason to stop the pipelines from Alberta has always been about climate change first, the more local environmental second. But that is not how they were protested. Climate change activists may have led many protests, but the rank and file comes from people motivated to stop the pipelines because of the potential for direct local harm.

If that were not the case there would be just as many protests against Trans mountain in Montreal and Kitimat would be protesting Energy East.

The environmental movement has learned to stay out of politics and to look at local effects to motivate protest. On the coast it's tanker traffic. If environmentalists had insisted people focus on climate change they wouldn't have had so much success.

"The Leap" can't focus on local issues but it must appeal to the majority if it is serious about triggering a virtual revolution that could go worldwide.

I do hope that The Leap will be wildly successful. I agree with the premise that radical change to a green economy is well within reach. I just don't think that the Leap does a good job of making that argument. I don't think it will motivate the mainstream.

Canada's relationship to indigenous peoples is going to change for the better because it would be difficult for Trudeau to be as horrible as Harper has been. To some extent there is no where to go but up. I hope he keeps all of his commitments to indigenous peoples.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

pondering..time will tell how effective the leap will be.

...

..about an hour long.

WTF: What's the Future? A rabble.ca video panel

quote:

Rabble.ca brought together an incredible group of speakers to do just that.

They are some of Canada's most prominent progressives: Avi Lewis, Pam Palmater, Libby Davies, Kim Stanton, Eric Pineault, Amira Elghawaby, Fred Wilson and David Climenhaga. They're coming together for this panel to discuss just how movements for progressive social change can carry their messages into the halls of power under a Liberal majority government.

We've brought this incredible group of thinkers and activists together to start the discussion about how progressive moments pivot from a decade of Harper conservatives to a new majority Liberal government under Justin Trudeau. What does a Liberal majority government mean for progressive movements? What tactics and strategies should we be considering?

Pondering

epaulo13 wrote:

pondering..time will tell how effective the leap will be.

This is true, but I thought the point of the Leap is that we don't have time.

There is no doubt in my mind that environmental laws will be improved on and progress will be made on just about every progressive issue facing Canada during Trudeau's first mandate. That will in large part be due to the many activists that have educated people over decades so I do not negate their influence, but it will not be a result of "The Leap Manifesto".

Due to Harper's extreme regressiveness just turning back the clock 10 years will seem dramatically progressive so I feel quite confident that Trudeau will be a very popular PM for at least this mandate.

How do you measure the effectiveness of The Leap Manifesto? The kind of transformation it proposes doesn't happen overnight but it can't take decades to build up support either. I agree with the urgency suggested by the Leap Manifesto. So far the rate of support doesn't seem even close to what it would take for the Leap to begin within a decade.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

CUPE kids make great sign!. Thanks to the Youth Council for visiting the village today and helping make Leap rally signs.

 

Geoff

Pondering wrote:

epaulo13 wrote:

pondering..time will tell how effective the leap will be.

This is true, but I thought the point of the Leap is that we don't have time.

There is no doubt in my mind that environmental laws will be improved on and progress will be made on just about every progressive issue facing Canada during Trudeau's first mandate. That will in large part be due to the many activists that have educated people over decades so I do not negate their influence, but it will not be a result of "The Leap Manifesto".

Due to Harper's extreme regressiveness just turning back the clock 10 years will seem dramatically progressive so I feel quite confident that Trudeau will be a very popular PM for at least this mandate.

How do you measure the effectiveness of The Leap Manifesto? The kind of transformation it proposes doesn't happen overnight but it can't take decades to build up support either. I agree with the urgency suggested by the Leap Manifesto. So far the rate of support doesn't seem even close to what it would take for the Leap to begin within a decade.

The only reason we will make any "progress" under Trudeau is because, unless we had elected a neo-fascist, we couldn't do any worse. The bar had been set so low, even the Liberals could do better.

However, they picked a white, male Bay Street corporate executive as Finance Minister, so anyone who thinks the election of Justin Trudeau represents "real change" must be on a sugar high from all the kool-aid they've been drinking.

Pondering

Geoff wrote:

Pondering wrote:

This is true, but I thought the point of the Leap is that we don't have time.

.....

How do you measure the effectiveness of The Leap Manifesto? The kind of transformation it proposes doesn't happen overnight but it can't take decades to build up support either. I agree with the urgency suggested by the Leap Manifesto. So far the rate of support doesn't seem even close to what it would take for the Leap to begin within a decade.

The only reason we will make any "progress" under Trudeau is because, unless we had elected a neo-fascist, we couldn't do any worse. The bar had been set so low, even the Liberals could do better.

However, they picked a white, male Bay Street corporate executive as Finance Minister, so anyone who thinks the election of Justin Trudeau represents "real change" must be on a sugar high from all the kool-aid they've been drinking.

I agree. Leap style transformation will not occur under the Trudeau administration. That's my point. If the Leap Manifesto is intended as a "rally the troops" call out, then I suppose you could say mission accomplished.

If it was to gain broad popular support it hasn't worked. It still could in the future but I see no reason why it would because it isn't aimed at pursuading the people it would have to inspire. That just seems pig-headed to me. I'm more interested in results than righteousness. The left is so focused on individual causes that they can't stop dividing the 99%.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

So far the rate of support doesn't seem even close to what it would take for the Leap to begin within a decade.

..it’s quite amazing how quickly consciousness raising can work. we can see this in the rise of the 99% via occupy. idle no more for another. for me, a long long time activist, participating in the the van occupy brought me to a level of thinking that that i hadn’t experienced before. it also brought me to a point where i could let go much of my fears and dived into it maybe 90-95%. which is quite high for me.

..i have followed the square occupation since the middle east uprisings. i especially followed the occupations in spain where i watched video footage of young people sitting in a square being beaten with batons by police. yet they refused to move. and these folks were not long time seasoned activists. over and over again you heard that at a certain point you loose all fear of authority.

..this is how i believe things will progress and quickly. via conciousness raising.

Pondering

epaulo13 wrote:

So far the rate of support doesn't seem even close to what it would take for the Leap to begin within a decade.

..it’s quite amazing how quickly consciousness raising can work. we can see this in the rise of the 99% via occupy. idle no more for another. for me, a long long time activist, participating in the the van occupy brought me to a level of thinking that that i hadn’t experienced before. it also brought me to a point where i could let go much of my fears and dived into it maybe 90-95%. which is quite high for me.

..i have followed the square occupation since the middle east uprisings. i especially followed the occupations in spain where i watched video footage of young people sitting in a square being beaten with batons by police. yet they refused to move. and these folks were not long time seasoned activists. over and over again you heard that at a certain point you loose all fear of authority.

..this is how i believe things will progress and quickly. via conciousness raising.

I would like to believe you but so far consciouness raising has not let to fast progress. If it had the oil sands would be shut down by now.

Consciousness raising is still a good thing. Occupy did manage to make income inequality an issue that is discussed and acknowledged as a problem.

Nevertheless the left seems to be very adverse to appealing to people's self-interest which is frustrating. It is as though the left insists on snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.

Does "the left" for lack of a better term believe equality and environmental justice would benefit the majority of people or not?

I think I kind of get it. People dedicated to justice are driven to highlight the needs of those who are suffering most. If you are trying to motivate the majority to do something to help the under-priveleged then the traditional approach works, but it is limited. You can convince people to donate a bit more to charity, or even to prompt a minority to offer to host a refugee family. It's unlikely to get people to support a minimum income when the other guy is saying such a thing would bankrupt the country and unemployment would soar.

The easiest way to sell minimum income is to prove that it would cost the same or less than what we have now and bring greater benefit to society as a whole.

In my view the primary reason occupy ran out of steam is that they started focusing on subsets of the 99% instead on the .oo1% that are draining wealth from the people through complex financial instruments, a massive neverending con job. The stock market is organized in such as way as to allow people to make money off of "investing" in something for 3 minutes while people who invested their life-savings for years lose out.

If The Leap is achieved it will benefit everyone. The easiest path to success is to focus on benefits to the 99%. That doesn't mean everything else should come to a grinding halt. But as long as the left ignores the 99% the right will continue to win their support.

 

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epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..here is an audio report on the yesterday's vancouver cupe/leap rally. about 1,000 people came out. it is quite interesting that the leap will be at the paris climate talks along with the newly released "this changes everything" video. stephan lewis was quite witty yesterday and delivered what i thought was an excellent speech.

..the rally speeches begin around the 15min mark. it begins a little shaky but works itself out.

audio podcast

...

Relentless Pressure from Below Drives Climate Action - Ta'Kaiya Blaney & Naomi Klein

Ta'Kaiya Blaney and Naomi Klein sent an inspiring message about the growing power of the climate justice movement, and the need to ramp up action at a Vancouver Rally.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from the update page

This action is taking place on the traditional territories of the the Algonquin Nation. We strive to build positive relationships with Indigenous landholders by grounding our work in principles of decolonization and aligning ourselves in solidarity with the struggle for Indigenous sovereignty.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..pics from today. update page

Our water women leading the way on our #climatewelcome March - we are the #water keepers pic.twitter.com/6TsO5JjCIs

Our water women leading the way on our #climatewelcome March - we are the #water keepers pic.twitter.com/6TsO5JjCIs

RT @Toronto350: Indigenous leaders, college students, grandparents, many more linking together for round dance at #climatewelcome https://t…

 Indigenous leaders, college students, grandparents, many more linking together for round dance at #climatewelcome https://t…

RT @350Vancouver: Day three of #climatewelcome the #westcoastwarriorwomen are heading out to Rideau Hall pic.twitter.com/llSwt9N5xa

 Day three of #climatewelcome the #westcoastwarriorwomen are heading  out to Rideau Hall pic.twitter.com/llSwt9N5xa

Day 3 of cheering for the people of #climatewelcome. @JustinTrudeau, allez leur dire bonjour! pic.twitter.com/ThTUV85rck


 Protesters take Sussex Drive to Trudeau residence. #climatewelcome #otttraffic #ottcity #ottnews pic.twitter.com/VuGHKmbqkN

Barry Weisleder

A great 'Leap' sideways

Popular discontent with establishment politics has found another voice. Sponsored by an array of Canadian left critics of the status quo, “The Leap Manifesto” is a sweeping indictment of the dominant system – without naming it. In that regard, its proponents fall short of Catholic Pope Francis who boldly calls capitalist greed “the dung of the devil.”

The Leap-ers include Bruce Cockburn, Charles Taylor, Clayton Ruby, Hassan Yussuff, David Suzuki, Judy Rebick, Leonard Cohen, Maude Barlow, Michael Ondaatje, Naomi Klein, Neil Young, Sarah Polley, Tantoo Cardinal, and Thomas King. Together with many others, they decry “deepening poverty and inequality” and denounce “Canada's record on climate change (as) a crime against humanity's future.”

They envision a society “powered entirely by truly just renewable energy”, connected by “accessible public transit”, and involving a transition designed to put an end to racial and gender inequality.

But the 'leap' they ask us to take carefully side-steps the issue of political power – who has it, and how to change it.

This approach leads to a string of disappointments.

The demand that the rights of First Nations peoples be respected concludes with a limp plea to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The appeal for a shift to green energy is tied to a vague hope that communities will “create innovative ownership structures.”

How exactly would that put a dent in the obstructive capacity of Big Oil and Gas? How would that even begin to fund the implementation of new energy technologies, build energy efficient homes or retrofit existing housing, much less pay for more high speed rail and mass urban public transit?

Where the manifesto rejects “austerity” it does offer a glimpse of a new path. It projects an end to fossil fuel subsidies, and the need to begin to steeply tax giant corporations and wealthy people. This is a good conversation starter.

However, The Leap is mum on how politically to wage that assault on concentrated wealth and power, much less how to sustain it. Ignored is the fact that a few super-rich families own the means of production, distribution and exchange. They obtained it by the dispossessiing the original peoples of the continent and by the exploiting many generations of workers.

Obscured is the fact that the modern socio-economic aristocracy controls the state – which is poised to put down any serious challenge to the corporate agenda. Remember the War Measures Act? The G20 protests in Toronto? Government strike breaking? Killer cops and racial carding? Law C-51?

In other words, to truly Leap forward it will be necessary to make a social revolution. It will be necessary to build a revolutionary workers' party that is capable of avoiding the snares of reformism and opportunism, and that can bring the working class to power on the basis of work place and neighbourhood structures that will put our superficial dollar-democracy to shame.

Now that would be a Leap forward.

In the meantime, proponents of The Leap Manifesto, including delegates to the Toronto and York Region Labour Council who endorsed it on September 3, can take some practical steps.

Vote NDP, but always without illusions.

Most importantly: build a class struggle left wing that fights year-round for anti-austerity, socialist policies and actions in the unions and in the NDP. The result will be a broader base for the radical change that is so desperately needed.

Barry Weisleder

A great 'Leap' sideways

Popular discontent with establishment politics has found another voice. Sponsored by an array of Canadian left critics of the status quo, “The Leap Manifesto” is a sweeping indictment of the dominant system – without naming it. In that regard, its proponents fall short of Catholic Pope Francis who boldly calls capitalist greed “the dung of the devil.”

The Leap-ers include Bruce Cockburn, Charles Taylor, Clayton Ruby, Hassan Yussuff, David Suzuki, Judy Rebick, Leonard Cohen, Maude Barlow, Michael Ondaatje, Naomi Klein, Neil Young, Sarah Polley, Tantoo Cardinal, and Thomas King. Together with many others, they decry “deepening poverty and inequality” and denounce “Canada's record on climate change (as) a crime against humanity's future.”

They envision a society “powered entirely by truly just renewable energy”, connected by “accessible public transit”, and involving a transition designed to put an end to racial and gender inequality.

But the 'leap' they ask us to take carefully side-steps the issue of political power – who has it, and how to change it.

This approach leads to a string of disappointments.

The demand that the rights of First Nations peoples be respected concludes with a limp plea to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The appeal for a shift to green energy is tied to a vague hope that communities will “create innovative ownership structures.”

How exactly would that put a dent in the obstructive capacity of Big Oil and Gas? How would that even begin to fund the implementation of new energy technologies, build energy efficient homes or retrofit existing housing, much less pay for more high speed rail and mass urban public transit?

Where the manifesto rejects “austerity” it does offer a glimpse of a new path. It projects an end to fossil fuel subsidies, and the need to begin to steeply tax giant corporations and wealthy people. This is a good conversation starter.

However, The Leap is mum on how politically to wage that assault on concentrated wealth and power, much less how to sustain it. Ignored is the fact that a few super-rich families own the means of production, distribution and exchange. They obtained it by the dispossessiing the original peoples of the continent and by the exploiting many generations of workers.

Obscured is the fact that the modern socio-economic aristocracy controls the state – which is poised to put down any serious challenge to the corporate agenda. Remember the War Measures Act? The G20 protests in Toronto? Government strike breaking? Killer cops and racial carding? Law C-51?

In other words, to truly Leap forward it will be necessary to make a social revolution. It will be necessary to build a revolutionary workers' party that is capable of avoiding the snares of reformism and opportunism, and that can bring the working class to power on the basis of work place and neighbourhood structures that will put our superficial dollar-democracy to shame.

Now that would be a Leap forward.

In the meantime, proponents of The Leap Manifesto, including delegates to the Toronto and York Region Labour Council who endorsed it on September 3, can take some practical steps.

Vote NDP, but always without illusions.

Most importantly: build a class struggle left wing that fights year-round for anti-austerity, socialist policies and actions in the unions and in the NDP. The result will be a broader base for the radical change that is so desperately needed.

Unionist

What a stupid post. Doubly stupid, I should say.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Barry Weisleder wrote:

In other words, to truly Leap forward it will be necessary to make a social revolution. It will be necessary to build a revolutionary workers' party that is capable of avoiding the snares of reformism and opportunism, and that can bring the working class to power on the basis of work place and neighbourhood structures that will put our superficial dollar-democracy to shame.

..i rememeber using similar language back in the early 70's. calling for a revolutionary party..but that never happened and as far as far i can see today..not likely to. there are reasons for this i believe. the most important is that this plays into the politics of division. it is not inclusive.

..the struggle has changed from a time this revolutionary retoric was used. today the struggle is for a participitory democracy and is inclusive. when we look around the globe capital controls governments and for any that resisit a hell is created for the population. a different world needs to be envisioned. one where decisions are made at a grassroots level. 

..this is what the leap represents. and if you listen to the audio report from vancouver you hear at least 2 of the speakers (signatories of the leap) talk about the end of capitalism.

..as for the ndp. you need to start by making it democratic.

Unionist

epaulo13 wrote:

Barry Weisleder wrote:

In other words, to truly Leap forward it will be necessary to make a social revolution. It will be necessary to build a revolutionary workers' party that is capable of avoiding the snares of reformism and opportunism, and that can bring the working class to power on the basis of work place and neighbourhood structures that will put our superficial dollar-democracy to shame.

..i rememeber using similar language back in the early 70's. calling for a revolutionary party..but that never happened and as far as far i can see today..not likely to. there are reasons for this i believe. the most important is that this plays into the politics of division. it is not inclusive.

..the struggle has changed from a time this revolutionary retoric was used. today the struggle is for a participitory democracy and is inclusive. when we look around the globe capital controls governments and for any that resisit a hell is created for the population. a different world needs to be envisioned. one where decisions are made at a grassroots level. 

..this is what the leap represents. and if you listen to the audio report from vancouver you hear at least 2 of the speakers (signatories of the leap) talk about the end of capitalism.

..as for the ndp. you need to start by making it democratic.

What a powerful and refreshing response to stale old stuff! Thank you as always, epaulo!

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