Uber needs to be run out of town

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Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Very well.  Sounds more like an argument that propective Ubers drivers should think twice, though, rather than an argument that they need to be run out of town.  And it's surely not why the taxi industry is so opposed to Uber.

Rev Pesky

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Very well.  Sounds more like an argument that propective Ubers drivers should think twice, though, rather than an argument that they need to be run out of town.  And it's surely not why the taxi industry is so opposed to Uber.

But that's the problem, many Uber drivers are vehicle owners with not many choices left. Using their vehicle for Uber may be the only way to keep it for themselves. I don't know what it's like elsewhere, but in BC, cabs have to have an inspection every six months, and in Vancouver cannot be older than 6 model years (the oldest car in the fleet now would be 2010). Who is inspecting Uber's cars? Who is making sure they're properly insured? 

How about having Uber turn over to the relevant authorities all the information on their drivers, so they can be monitored for compliance? I don't know why, but I think the Uber thing would disappear pretty quickly if Uber cabs had to comply with the same rules and regulations that govern the rest of the cab industry.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
But that's the problem, many Uber drivers are vehicle owners with not many choices left.

Well, they have one more option than they would have had prior to 2009.

Quote:
I don't know why, but I think the Uber thing would disappear pretty quickly if Uber cabs had to comply with the same rules and regulations that govern the rest of the cab industry.

They'd face all the same rules and regulations as existing cab companies -- including the irrelevant one about six model years -- but  enjoy none of the monopoly that cab companies do.

Why is there a fixed number of taxicab plates available each year in a city like Toronto?  Is it to the benefit of consumers who can't find a cab when they need one, or is it to the benefit of taxicab companies and their drivers?  To again return to sub shops, the government doesn't place an arbitrary limit on the number of sub shops permitted to open -- they let the market decide how many is too many.

voice of the damned

Magoo wrote:

Why is there a fixed number of taxicab plates available each year in a city like Toronto? Is it to the benefit of consumers who can't find a cab when they need one, or is it to the benefit of taxicab companies and their drivers?

An argument I've heard is that too many cabs on the road means too much competition among drivers, and hence drivers working longer hours, which means more exhausted drivers behind the wheel, which means more accidents.

Now, of course, with a regular business, the government can regulate and monitor the number of hours an employee can work. Just speculating here, but it might be more difficult to do that with cabs.

 

abnormal

voice of the damned wrote:
... with a regular business, the government can regulate and monitor the number of hours an employee can work. Just speculating here, but it might be more difficult to do that with cabs.

Pretty much impossible, at least for owner operated cabs.  If the taxi company owns the cab and rents it to drivers they can police how many hours the driver has the cab but an owner can work whatever hours, time of day, whatever, he/she wants.

voice of the damned

abnormal wrote:

voice of the damned wrote:
... with a regular business, the government can regulate and monitor the number of hours an employee can work. Just speculating here, but it might be more difficult to do that with cabs.

Pretty much impossible, at least for owner operated cabs.  If the taxi company owns the cab and rents it to drivers they can police how many hours the driver has the cab but an owner can work whatever hours, time of day, whatever, he/she wants.

If that's the case, then, yeah, I guess you could make an argument for limiting the number of cabs in order to curtail dangerously excessive working hours.

 

Rev Pesky

Mr. Magoo wrote:
...They'd face all the same rules and regulations as existing cab companies -- including the irrelevant one about six model years -- but  enjoy none of the monopoly that cab companies do...

But they don't face the same set of regulations, that's what this is all about. No one is monitoring Uber cabs. And if you think for a little bit, you might stumble on why the 'irreleant' six year old rule is in place. To help out, I'll tell you that speedomoters can be manipulated, model years can't.

Mr. Magoo wrote:
To again return to sub shops, the government doesn't place an arbitrary limit on the number of sub shops permitted to open...

The minute submarine sandwiches become a safety issue on public streets, and an essential part of transportation in the city, the government may take more of an interest.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

So there's a fixed number of taxi plates available "because safety"?

Quote:
Pretty much impossible, at least for owner operated cabs.  If the taxi company owns the cab and rents it to drivers they can police how many hours the driver has the cab but an owner can work whatever hours, time of day, whatever, he/she wants.

Long haul truckers have very rigid rules governing how many hours per day, and total hours per week they can drive, as well as how long they have to rest between shifts.

 

voice of the damned

Rev Pesky wrote:

Mr. Magoo wrote:
...They'd face all the same rules and regulations as existing cab companies -- including the irrelevant one about six model years -- but  enjoy none of the monopoly that cab companies do...

But they don't face the same set of regulations, that's what this is all about. No one is monitoring Uber cabs. And if you think for a little bit, you might stumble on why the 'irreleant' six year old rule is in place. To help out, I'll tell you that speedomoters can be manipulated, model years can't.

Mr. Magoo wrote:
To again return to sub shops, the government doesn't place an arbitrary limit on the number of sub shops permitted to open...

The minute submarine sandwiches become a safety issue on public streets, and an essential part of transportation in the city, the government may take more of an interest.

 

I'm not sure about that "essential service" bit. If taxis are an essential service, than we REALLY need to do something about lowering the fares. As it is now, regular use of taxi cabs in Canada is cost-prohibitive to anyone earning less than an upper middle-class income.

 

voice of the damned

Mr. Magoo wrote:

So there's a fixed number of taxi plates available "because safety"?

Quote:
Pretty much impossible, at least for owner operated cabs.  If the taxi company owns the cab and rents it to drivers they can police how many hours the driver has the cab but an owner can work whatever hours, time of day, whatever, he/she wants.

Long haul truckers have very rigid rules governing how many hours per day, and total hours per week they can drive, as well as how long they have to rest between shifts.

 

Well, agaoin, I'm not an expert on these things, but I'd speculate that it's easier to monitor a fleet of centrally-owned long-haul trucks with pre-set travel routes, than it is to monitor hundreds of privately owned cars that can be driven around at the owners convenience, and each of which is in direct competition with the other.  

 

abnormal

voice of the damned wrote:

Mr. Magoo wrote:

So there's a fixed number of taxi plates available "because safety"?

Quote:
Pretty much impossible, at least for owner operated cabs.  If the taxi company owns the cab and rents it to drivers they can police how many hours the driver has the cab but an owner can work whatever hours, time of day, whatever, he/she wants.

Long haul truckers have very rigid rules governing how many hours per day, and total hours per week they can drive, as well as how long they have to rest between shifts.

Well, agaoin, I'm not an expert on these things, but I'd speculate that it's easier to monitor a fleet of centrally-owned long-haul trucks with pre-set travel routes, than it is to monitor hundreds of privately owned cars that can be driven around at the owners convenience, and each of which is in direct competition with the other.  

On the subject of long haul trucks, not all of them are centrally owned (even those painted with the name of a single company).

And despite the rules some of the drivers do some pretty extreme things - during the summers when I worked in a warehouse it wasn't uncommon to see drivers pull in completely wired on speeders of one sort or another just so they could keep going.

And compensation packages don't necessarily help - many companies pay their drivers by the trip as opposed to by the hour or whatever.  Paying by the trip encourages them to squeeze in that one extra trip or to keep driving when they know they are too tired to keep going (if you spend any time dealing with risk managers and insurance for long haul truckers you'd see that one).

Having said that, it still has to be far easier to monitor the driving habits of a relatively small fleet of trucks as opposed to hundreds (thousands?) of privately owned cabs and drivers.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
I'd speculate that it's easier to monitor a fleet of centrally-owned long-haul trucks with pre-set travel routes, than it is to monitor hundreds of privately owned cars that can be driven around at the owners convenience, and each of which is in direct competition with the other. 

To whatever degree it's easier to monitor those trucks because you know where they're heading, it's probably a wee bit more difficult when they're driving through Arizona, or Saskatchewan.

But really, it's just not that clear to me how having a fixed number of taxi plates prevents a taxi driver from pulling a 12 hour shift.

I'm not convinced that "safety" is the real reason for the limit, and I'm entirely UNconvinced that "safety" is why taxi companies are OK with that limit.  I'm kind of thinking that maybe they like the lack of competition, too.  Until Uber, of course.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

An interesting piece in the Star, about Kristine Hubbard of Beck Taxi, and Uber.

voice of the damned

But really, it's just not that clear to me how having a fixed number of taxi plates prevents a taxi driver from pulling a 12 hour shift.

Well, the main argument that I always heard was not that it PREVENTS drivers from pulling overlong shifts, but that it makes them less likely to do so. Because with fewer drivers on the road, it'll be easier for them to pick up a financially viable number of fares in shorter time.

I'm not convinced that "safety" is the real reason for the limit, and I'm entirely UNconvinced that "safety" is why taxi companies are OK with that limit.

Well, yeah, but in any situation like this, you've got multiple motivations on the part of the various actors.

Right now, for a foreigner to teach English in Korea, they need to have a university degree, and be from one of seven designated countries, all of them current or former British territory. Now, if it were proposed to extend this privilege to Albanian high-school dropouts, I could probably make a fairly convincing case as to why that wouldn't be a good idea for the students. And that case is not undermined by the fact that my main personal concern is mimimizing competition in the ESL job-market.

 

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Well, the main argument that I always heard was not that it PREVENTS drivers from pulling overlong shifts, but that it makes them less likely to do so. Because with fewer drivers on the road, it'll be easier for them to pick up a financially viable number of fares in shorter time.

Fascinatingly, the cost of a single taxi plate in Toronto averages about $120,000, with a one-time highest price of $360,000.

If the goal is to ensure that taxi drivers can be financially viable without having to drive 16 hour shifts, perhaps there are other ways to promote that, rather than fixing supply of licences to the point that they can cost as much as a small condo.

wage zombie

I think there's a lot to criticize about Uber.

But I also think Magoo's point about taxi companies feeling entitled and not innovating is also technically true.  While taxi companies should do what they can to lobby against Uber,  they are foolish to not be innovating as well.

Here in Vancouver, I have noticed some taxis advertising "Download our App", but I have yet to do so.  I very rarely take taxis myself.  Uber has not yet been allowed in Vancouver.

I can also understand why people don't have much sympathy for taxi companies.  Many people I have talked to have had bad experiences with taxi drivers.

All of this is missing the forest for the trees though.  Running Uber out of town will do nothing to combat the fact that 10 years from now, all taxis and Uber cars will be driven by robots, not humans.  All these arguments about Uber exploiting labour will be moot.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Here's an interesting take on the issue, from an industry insider.

One thing I didn't know prior to all of this is that Beck (as an example) isn't exactly a "cab company" -- they don't own, lease or maintain a fleet -- they're a "cab brokerage".  They provide dispatch services to drivers, and in a sense actually work for the drivers, rather than the other way around.  Given that, Uber is probably a bigger threat to them than it is to individual drivers.

wage zombie

That's a good link.

I'd criticize this though:

Quote:

What a great business concept, no overhead, no investment, just a computer programme and a bunch of slick talkers who somehow convince local politicians, the media and their “partners” that they are the greatest thing that ever came down the pike.

That's quite the mischaracterization and I think it leads to misunderstanding of technology.

There is a massive, MASSIVE amount of overhead and investment in Uber.  Calling it "Just a computer programme" (sic) is ridiculous.

It would definitely not be profitable to build something like Uber to serve just one city.  It would not be profitable to build it for 5 cities.  I wouldn't be surprised if it weren't profitable to build it for 20 cities.

But given the number of cities, something like Uber can still be obscenely profitable when rolled out on a mass scale.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Evidently, Beck also has "a computer programme" and has had for a while.  I haven't ever used it myself, and so I wonder whether it actually represents any kind of innovation, or whether it's just the mobile version of ordering your pizza via a web form rather than by telephone.  If it just pops up a message on a screen, that some dispatcher then sends out to cabs via radio, then I'd say it falls short of being an industry game-changer.

As an aside, have you ever sat in a cab and tried to make sense of the dispatch radio chatter?  I've never been able to figure out how radio dispatch works -- not even a little. 

I would expect "Cab 1411, please go to 1512 Landsdowne and ask for Susan", but it's more like "1411, I've got seventeen on the four-two.  I've got five on the one-one... 855??"  Is this some kind of Windtalking?

abnormal

voice of the damned wrote:
But really, it's just not that clear to me how having a fixed number of taxi plates prevents a taxi driver from pulling a 12 hour shift.

Well, the main argument that I always heard was not that it PREVENTS drivers from pulling overlong shifts, but that it makes them less likely to do so. Because with fewer drivers on the road, it'll be easier for them to pick up a financially viable number of fares in shorter time.

While it may make it easier for a driver to pick up a financially viable number of plates in a shorter time that's still no guarantee that drivers will limit their hours.

But it's not hard to argue that limiting the number of taxi plates will simply drive the price up which could more than offset any benefits to the drivers in terms of the number of fares they pick up.

voice of the damned

abnormal wrote:

voice of the damned wrote:
But really, it's just not that clear to me how having a fixed number of taxi plates prevents a taxi driver from pulling a 12 hour shift.

Well, the main argument that I always heard was not that it PREVENTS drivers from pulling overlong shifts, but that it makes them less likely to do so. Because with fewer drivers on the road, it'll be easier for them to pick up a financially viable number of fares in shorter time.

While it may make it easier for a driver to pick up a financially viable number of plates in a shorter time that's still no guarantee that drivers will limit their hours.

 

Well, it might not be a guarantee that any one individual driver is going to limit his hours, I think common sense would dictate that, overall, there would be fewer hours worked, if drivers were able to earn more in less time.

That is, all else being equal, which gets us to Magoo's point about the cost of taxi licenses in a regulated market. It does seem we're caught up in a vicious circle with some of these issues.

 

 

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

One thing the City could do, theoretically anyway, would be to make plates non-transferrable.

As I understand it, the City only charges about $5k for a plate, along with a yearly renewal fee that's under $2k.  The rest of the high cost of a plate is "what the market will bear".  If plates couldn't be sold then no cabbie would have to pay off a huge debt from buying one on Craigslist (but also couldn't sell theirs on Craigslist if they retire or change careers). 

If a cabbie retires, their plate could just go back into circulation to be re-sold by the City using whatever system they use -- I guess I would assume some kind of lottery or whatever.

Cabbies who bought theirs for $200k at some point would be not unreasonably miffed, but really, it wouldn't be all that different from someone who makes their last student loan payment the day the government announces free tuition.

voice of the damned

Mr. Magoo wrote:

As I understand it, the City only charges about $5k for a plate, along with a yearly renewal fee that's under $2k.  The rest of the high cost of a plate is "what the market will bear".  If plates couldn't be sold then no cabbie would have to pay off a huge debt from buying one on Craigslist (but also couldn't sell theirs on Craigslist if they retire or change careers). 

If a cabbie retires, their plate could just go back into circulation to be re-sold by the City using whatever system they use -- I guess I would assume some kind of lottery or whatever.

Wow, some people must be pretty desperate to drive a cab, if they're willing to pay over a hundred grand(as per your figures) for a second-hand plate, when buying s new one straight from the City would only be about five grand.

I guess maybe the availability of first-use plates is fairly scant? Or is there something else about the economics of it that I'm missing here?

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
I guess maybe the availability of first-use plates is fairly scant? Or is there something else about the economics of it that I'm missing here?

I think that's basically it.  Just a plain supply/demand thing.

Paladin1

I think if people had more positive experiences taking cabs the cab drivers would find more support from people. I'm seeing a lot of people across SM talking about horrible experiendes from cab rides. I would rate the last 5 out of 7 cab rides I've had as pretty negative. I can't see myself taking a cab again unless I'm very desperate.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Could be, though to be fair:

I think some people are just going to like anything that's less expensive.

I think some people are just going to prefer a white person to a brown person.

I think some people are just going to love anything new they can do with their iPhone.

And ya, some people might have had shitty experiences with taxis.

But I can honestly say that other than maybe once or twice having to wait a bit longer than estimated for a dispatched cab, I don't think I've ever had any experience with taxis that was so bad as to be memorable.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I've rarely had a bad experience with cab drivers (except for a few horrible tourist experiences in NYC, Chengdu and Delhi - once in each city). Everywhere else it's been satisfying if not excellent.

These days I take cabs for work reasons at least twice a week and I am so happy with the service. And the service has been top rate (often arriving before I even get out to the sidewalk). The cab company I use has apps options but also has phone/cell recognition so that they know exactly where to pick me up. These improvements could be easily made by most cab companies and I hope that becomes the standard so that people don't think they are inferior to Uber.

I really hate the 'sharing economy' misnomer used by Uber and SkyBB and others. It makes it sound like a barter system when in fact, the owners of the paradigm are making money hand over fist by not having to pay for regulatory compliance or employees.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
It makes it sound like a barter system when in fact, the owners of the paradigm are making money hand over fist by not having to pay for regulatory compliance or employees.

As noted above, Beck Taxi (just as a familiar example) also doesn't have to pay anything for regulatory compliance or employees.  Their job is also just to dispatch a cab to someone who wants one.

How would you say they differ from Uber, other than being mostly telephone-based?

Unionist

[url=http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/alberta/calgary-judge-issues-tempora... judge issues temporary injunction against drivers offering rides using Uber[/url]

Quote:

A court has issued a temporary injunction stopping drivers from offering rides for a fee using the Uber app in Calgary.

Justice G. H. Poelman of Court of Queen’s Bench issued the injunction Friday and it will be in place until a hearing on Dec. 17.

The city of Calgary will argue at that time to have the injunction permanently in place to stop drivers from offering or providing rides for a fee using a vehicle hired through the Uber smartphone-based app until safety, insurance and regulatory requirements are met.

abnormal

Mr. Magoo wrote:
How would you say they differ from Uber, other than being mostly telephone-based?

Just saw a post on Facebook for an app that lets you book a cab directly via your phone - think you've still got to pay cash as opposed to paying thru the app but other than that it looks like the biggest difference between that and Uber is that fact that it only connects you to taxis.  

abnormal

Unionist wrote:

[url=http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/alberta/calgary-judge-issues-tempora... judge issues temporary injunction against drivers offering rides using Uber[/url]

Quote:

A court has issued a temporary injunction stopping drivers from offering rides for a fee using the Uber app in Calgary.

Justice G. H. Poelman of Court of Queen’s Bench issued the injunction Friday and it will be in place until a hearing on Dec. 17.

The city of Calgary will argue at that time to have the injunction permanently in place to stop drivers from offering or providing rides for a fee using a vehicle hired through the Uber smartphone-based app until safety, insurance and regulatory requirements are met.

Somewhat of a losing battle - the fastest growing ride service is not Uber.

Regardless, now that the genie is out of the bottle it ain't going back in.

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

UBER is going to fail. I hate to sound like Kevin O'bnoxious but it is going to zero.

abnormal

If it fails it will simply be supplanted by someone or something else.

josh

Quote:
Toronto Mayor John Tory asked taxi drivers taking part in a city-wide protest against ride-hailing service Uber to "stand down" and halt a demonstration that earlier in the day led to a dangerous confrontation between two cab drivers and caused a police officer to be hurt.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/taxi-uber-protest-1.3356611

NorthReport

Seattle becomes first U.S. city to let Uber drivers unionize

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/12/14/seattle-decide-if-uber-lyf...

Unionist

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/uber-price-surge-new-years-eve-1....'s New Year's Eve price surge meant painful bills for revellers[/url]

Quote:

The morning after New Year's Eve celebrations, some Montrealers woke up to an expensive surprise: their Uber receipts.

During busy times, like New Year's Eve, the ride-hailing service hikes fares to draw more drivers to areas where demand is high.

For Rob Berger, a ride that normally costs $11 turned out to be $60.

"I wasn't in the best of conditions so I didn't really do the math," Berger said.

Several users took to social media to vent about the pricey fares. One woman said she paid more than $500 to get from downtown to Laval when prices surged to 7.5 times the normal rate.

I feel so sorry for these gullible idiots. You have no idea.

 

Maysie Maysie's picture

Uber drivers don't get extra money on those $60 and $100 rides on New Year's Eve either.

Uber sucks. Don't Uber.

Paladin1

Unionist wrote:

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/uber-price-surge-new-years-eve-1....'s New Year's Eve price surge meant painful bills for revellers[/url]

Quote:

The morning after New Year's Eve celebrations, some Montrealers woke up to an expensive surprise: their Uber receipts.

During busy times, like New Year's Eve, the ride-hailing service hikes fares to draw more drivers to areas where demand is high.

For Rob Berger, a ride that normally costs $11 turned out to be $60.

"I wasn't in the best of conditions so I didn't really do the math," Berger said.

Several users took to social media to vent about the pricey fares. One woman said she paid more than $500 to get from downtown to Laval when prices surged to 7.5 times the normal rate.

I feel so sorry for these gullible idiots. You have no idea.

 

I'm with you on that one.

 

Unionist

Taxis über Uber!

 

lagatta

I heard that story on Radio-Canada this morning, and someone pointed out that this was a serious public safety issue. Let's face it; when someone is a bit drunk + stoned plus who knows else (perhaps just tired) they are not going to have the best of judgement, and some will definitely opt to drive under the influence rather than taking a ridiculously priced ride. And doing so, they can kill or maim OTHER PEOPLE, not just themselves. The consensus seemed to be very much anti-Uber.

$500 from Montreal to Laval????

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Let's face it; when someone is a bit drunk + stoned plus who knows else (perhaps just tired) they are not going to have the best of judgement, and some will definitely opt to drive under the influence rather than taking a ridiculously priced ride.

If Uber is overpriced on NYE, aren't regular cabs an option the same as always?

wage zombie

Maysie wrote:

Uber drivers don't get extra money on those $60 and $100 rides on New Year's Eve either.

I've never used Uber in any capacity nor am I any kind of advocate for them, but I am pretty sure the drivers do see extra income when the surge prices are in effect.

Unionist

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
Let's face it; when someone is a bit drunk + stoned plus who knows else (perhaps just tired) they are not going to have the best of judgement, and some will definitely opt to drive under the influence rather than taking a ridiculously priced ride.

If Uber is overpriced on NYE, aren't regular cabs an option the same as always?

Drunken idiots are idiotic when drunk. They don't do well with "options". That's one reason why regulated fixed pricing (as in taxis) is better for society than a "market-based" variable gouging scam.

Some of us prefer a nanny state, where we all look after each other.

 

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Drunken idiots are idiotic when drunk. They don't do well with "options". That's one reason why regulated fixed pricing (as in taxis) is better for society than a "market-based" variable gouging scam.

I'm not defending Uber's opportunistic price hike.  I think it's kind of gross.

So I get how it's a price-gouging issue, and even a regulatory issue.  I just don't get how it's a public safety issue.

Unionist

Mr. Magoo wrote:

So I get how it's a price-gouging issue, and even a regulatory issue.  I just don't get how it's a public safety issue.

I haven't seen a convincing argument either on the public safety aspect. And as VOTD said somewhere above: "Well, yeah, but in any situation like this, you've got multiple motivations on the part of the various actors."

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
And as VOTD said somewhere above: "Well, yeah, but in any situation like this, you've got multiple motivations on the part of the various actors."

He's just a hidebound Game Theorist.

Paladin1

THis guy is funny.

http://globalnews.ca/news/2430713/alberta-man-furious-over-1000-uber-cha...

He racked up an Uber bill of over $1100 for a few stops in Edmonton.  I'm reading that Uber is currently illegal in edmonton.  Oops

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Uber is all about the forces of global finance capital swallowing up and eating one of the last locally owned and regulated industries on the planet.

You just have to look at who is investing in Uber...it's folks like Goldman Sachs, Microsoft, Google, Baidu and all sorts of other tech and venture capitalist outfits.

Uber has made it plain that they don't give a rat's ass about any kind of local regulations anywhere in the world.   They don't want any rules.   They just want their profits.

It's very easy to get caught up in "this cab driver done me wrong".    Uber destroying the taxi industry isn't going to "fix" any of that.

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
But it’s still not a reasonable cost to charge someone. It’s like with any other product – if the value isn’t there, you shouldn’t be paying that price.”

Or, as the article notes, actually re-typing that price and clicking "I Agree".

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Back in September, Al Jazeera America and the Houston Chronicle did a four part investigation of Uber's operations in that city.

Part One  The taxi wars: Uber takes Houston

Part Two  Full time with Uber, but running on fumes

Part Three  Uber is destroying the taxi industry

Part Four Trying to find a ride - with Uber

 

 

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