ONT NDP Leader Andrea Horwath will become Premier of Ontario 2

826 posts / 0 new
Last post
MegB

It's a matter of political priorities. I didn't have a license when I lived in Toronto because I didn't need a car, couldn't afford one and, to be honest, was afraid of the responsibility.  I cycled everywhere, except during the coldest and snowiest days of winter, and took transit. After moving to London, having used their PTS for a couple years, i needed to cut out the 2+ hours a day on transit so got a license and bought a car. 

I love driving, and I'm pretty good at it. I really enjoy walking. I also love cycling, and am pretty good at that too (just need to get my knees fixed and I'll be back on the bike!), but I'm too busy to spend hours on transit in London for a trip that would take 20 min by car.  I've met with the Chair of London's transit committee and there's neither the funding or the will to improve public transit. He said, "there isn't the ridership to warrant more routes". I said, "you'd get the ridership if you improved and increased the routes."  I doubt whether anyone on the transit committee has taken a bus in their adult lives.

Geoff

Now that Kathleen Wynne has said she can live with some sort of cut to auto insurance rates, the NDP will have to come up with something else, which hopefully will be something more substantial and more central to NDP values.  Whatever one thinks of cheaper auto insurance, it's not an issue that will capture the imagination of the electorate, particularly those who consider themselves progressive (whatever that means). 

The party needs an issue that will define who we are and how we differ from Wynne's Liberals. Otherwise, it's back to the political wilderness for the ONDP, and that would be bad news for Ontario.  Perhaps poverty or the growth in the number of those employed in "precarious" labour would be good issues.  What say the other babblers?

Unionist

Geoff wrote:

Now that Kathleen Wynne has said she can live with some sort of cut to auto insurance rates, the NDP will have to come up with something else,  [...]

The party needs an issue that will define who we are and how we differ from Wynne's Liberals.

Time for a merger, perhaps? If it's getting that hard for political junkies to tell them apart, imagine the plight of the poor voters.

Quote:
Perhaps poverty or the growth in the number of those employed in "precarious" labour would be good issues.  What say the other babblers?

The cynical babblers (not me) might say: "Nah, not enough swing votes in poverty."

Others might be more positive and start coining slogans, like: "We really care about poverty, and they say they do too, but they don't!!" [NOTE: This could actually be used as a template for many issues.]

I'm a foreigner, so tell me if I'm out of line. How about listing the issues that define how the NDP differs from Hudak's Conservatives - and offer to unite with anyone and everyone that shares those values?

Just a thought.

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

It depends on whether the party wants to commit to focusing on people who have not voted in the past. The young and many marginalized people vote in far less numbers than the middle and upper classes. Running on programs that appeal to that demographic is risky since there is no guarantee that they will come out and vote. That is why the NDP in most provinces focus on citizens who are already voters.  That precludes emphasizing programs for the marginalized and leads to things like supporting auto insurance cuts. I have always thought it should be a winning strategy for the NDP but so far they haven't adopted it anywhere presumably because the party strategists think that it is safer to try and appeal to the middle class.

Stockholm

The voter turn out in Toronto went way up in the 2010 municipal election - evidently people turned out to vote for Rob Ford Cry Things like pushing for car insurance cuts are actually the kinds of things that DO get marginal voters to the polls. 80% of the population drives...that is a lot higher than the % of the population that votes. Believe it or not there are a lot of young, lower income, "marginalized" people who also drive and are hot by usurious insurance rates. Its as a good a policy plank as nay to get them to vote.

All that being said, generally speaking its a total waste of time to build a campaign strategy around getting "non-voters" to vote. It never works. Even in 2008 when Obama had a great campaign and ONE BILLION dollar budget - it only got the turn out to inch up from 55% to 57%

mark_alfred

Hmm.  Passionate debate here.  Regarding auto insurance, I'm a cyclist, so I don't drive much, but I know people who do drive, and I like all of them (especially when they give me a lift to places I need to go). So, I support getting the government to lower the high insurance rates people pay in Ontario. So, I signed the petition linked below.

http://www.cutautorates.ca/

The petition states:

Quote:
Petition to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.  Whereas Ontario has the highest average premiums in Canada, but has one of the lowest rates of accident deaths and injuries in the country,  Whereas it is unfair that drivers are not benefiting from safe driving and that our premiums keep going up, I call on the Liberal government to cut auto insurance premiums by 15%, saving the average Ontario driver $226 per year.

To me the petition seems fair, reasonable, and left-leaning in spirit.  Hopefully the NDP will be elected in the future and we can finally get public auto insurance.  In the meantime, I'm glad to see a move toward greater regulation of the private insurance companies from government (in the same vein that I'm looking to see even further regulation of the private banking industry in Canada).

My feeling is that Horwath has the same folksy charm and spirit that the late Peter Kormos had (Peter, coincidentally, supported Andrea during the ONDP leadership race that she won).  His advocacy of the underdog, his posing for the Sun as a Sunshine Boy, his relentless energy, all remind me of Andrea.  Her pushing for and actually getting an increase in taxes on the very wealthy (an almost unheard of political achievement!), her pushing for and getting an increase in social assistance rates with a Liberal government hell-bent on austerity and freezing these rates, her decrying the transfer of wealth that the simultaneous lowering of corporate taxes with the raising of flat taxes (aka consumption taxes) on essentials represented, her stance against user fees and flat taxes as a means to fund public transit and instead advocating proper progressive taxes and proper support from higher levels of gov't for better public transit, her protesting the massive subsidies of the nuclear industry that result in higher utility charges to the population as a whole and simultaneously advocating conservation and renewable energy as a better solution than nuclear, her standing with the teachers and unions in general regardless of public sentiment, her awesome shoes advertisement during the last election cheekily showing that she is the different choice from the other two, her serving pints to people in pubs during the last campaign while stopping to openly speak with anyone...  Yes, she has the same folksy charm and fully left-leaning commitment as either Kormos or Layton.  Layton, coincidentally, also decried flat taxes such as the carbon tax, preferring a polluter pay system like cap and trade.

Unionist

Stockholm wrote:

80% of the population drives...that is a lot higher than the % of the population that votes.

Hang on a sec. 100% of the electorate pays taxes! So how about: "Vote for us and we will cut all taxes!" Even the poor pay sales tax, so they'll be on board.

Don't thank me. Just let me know where and when the victory party is happening.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

   This is a tram in Montpelier, France.   It's a city of about 250,000 or so give or take.    I was there in 2008.   They now have FOUR tramlines.

Toronto is begging for money to do all the lines that are on the books.   Some of them will actually get built.

Mississauga has about three times the population as Montpelier, France and has one tramline planned but absolutely no way to finance it.

There should be plans in the works plus financing for systems like this in Halton, Peel, York and Durham Regions, Ottawa, Hamilton, London, Windsor and in the Niagara Region.

France is serious about public transit.   No political party in Ontario or the rest of Canada for that matter is serious at all.

It's time for that to change and a 15% cut in auto insurance rates is hardly a transportation policy.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

mark_alfred wrote:

Hopefully the NDP will be elected in the future and we can finally get public auto insurance.  In the meantime, I'm glad to see a move toward greater regulation of the private insurance companies from government (in the same vein that I'm looking to see even further regulation of the private banking industry in Canada).

It would be great if they ran on installing public auto insurance. How much do you think a NAFTA arbitration panel would award the private companies as compensation?

onlinediscountanvils

Geoff wrote:
The party needs an issue that will define who we are and how we differ from Wynne's Liberals. Otherwise, it's back to the political wilderness for the ONDP, and that would be bad news for Ontario.  Perhaps poverty or the growth in the number of those employed in "precarious" labour would be good issues.  What say the other babblers?

 

The demands of the Raise the Rates Campaign would be my starting point:

- No cut to the Special Diet.

- Restore the Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit

- No downloading of ODSP or forcing people with disabilities into poverty jobs

- Restore OW and ODSP rates to where they were in 1995 - A 56% increase is needed now

- End the freeze on the minimum wage. Set it at $14 and index it to inflation.

mark_alfred

radiorahim wrote:

   This is a tram in Montpelier, France.   It's a city of about 250,000 or so give or take.    I was there in 2008.   They now have FOUR tramlines.

[snipped]

France is serious about public transit.   No political party in Ontario or the rest of Canada for that matter is serious at all.

It's time for that to change and a 15% cut in auto insurance rates is hardly a transportation policy.

How do auto insurance rates in France compare with auto insurance rates here in Ontario?  If France has better regulation of the auto insurance providers thus giving a fairer more affordable deal than here, then that hardly supports your argument.

Stockholm

What does one thing have to do with another? People don't pay insurance premiums to the provincial government which then uses the money to pay for transit...they pay premiums to private for profit companies which pocket the money. It would be wonderful to have a dense network of door to door LRTs and BRTs etc.. connecting everyone to everything but its not an either or issue. People are being gouged by insurance companies TODAY. They get exorbitant bills TODAY. Government action can lower insuarnce rates TODAY (or if not today in the next couple of months). In contrast even with all the money and political will in the world, it would take at least 20 years before a European style dense network of public transit coudl be built...20 long years where people would have the worst of both worlds - exorbitant car insuarnce AND no useful public transit alternatives.

This debate reminds me of arguments about health care funding when some people say - why do we keep spending more momoney on doctors and hospitals when we should instead eliminate poverty so that everyone is healthier - fine in theory, but people are on six month waiting lists for certain kinds of surgery right now and a massively ambitious program to eliminate poverty AND to wait for everyone's health to imporve as a result of no longer being poor would take about 50 years!

mersh

I agree it's not an either-or issue, except that perhaps some are interpreting insurance breaks as an actual NDP transportation platform -- given the absence of an actual NDP transportation platform. Metrolinx and the Board of Trade have tried to shape the argument around a sort of pay today for a better tomorrow approach, not making it clear that it's us who pay today and tomorrow. The plan for the region is highly utopian and pro-growth (to stabilize investment in the overall GTHA), but it will likely carry through. We've seen how the Metrolinx board can fold any local tranportation plan into its Big Move.

However, it's pretty divisive in its individualization and regionalization of fees. And that neoliberal tactic is somewhat contradictory -- some suburban GTA mayors are opposed to "paying for Toronto's transit". (Heck, folks in outer Mississauga are opposed to higher municipal taxes to help build infrastructure in that city's downtown.) It really is just an extension of the pay-per strategy that favours private-sector development over public ownership -- even if it runs against its own logic of cost and organizational efficiency. That's its risk, and dare I say, brilliance, in distracting us from a much broader debate over development.

And Lagatta, I will definitely look up your links!

mark_alfred

Stockholm wrote:

What does one thing have to do with another? People don't pay insurance premiums to the provincial government which then uses the money to pay for transit...they pay premiums to private for profit companies which pocket the money.

I agree.  However, radiorahim seems to feel differently, so I thought I'd honour his argument with a question pertaining to it.  My guess is that in France auto insurance providers are not allowed to run roughshod over the populace.  According to radiorahim's argument, which surreally connects regulating insurance providers to provide fair rates with having a poor transportation policy, this (proper regulation of insurance providers to provide fair rates) in radiorahim's argument would lead to a poor transportation policy.  My guess is that looking into insurance rates in France would not lead to the conclusion that radiorahim is suggesting.  In fact, I'd say that governments who neglect regulation in any area generally would be more likely to also have poorer neglectful transportation policy.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Hard to compare rates across geographic areas let alone countries.  I have heard right wingers from "Bald Headed Prairie" who have moved to Vancouver and complained that the state run insurance is way more expensive than where they came from.  Of course the insurance is more expensive in big cities because you are far more likely to have an accident if you drive in a big city than if you drive mostly on country roads.

Here is an article that doesn't totally answer the question above but seems to suggest that France is not a low insurance country. Notice that they add a 35% tax on their premiums. Maybe that is why they can afford public transit.

Quote:

Premiums

Insurance premiums are high in France – a reflection of the high accident rate, the large number of stolen and vandalised cars, and the high taxes (around 35 per cent) levied on car insurance. Premiums vary considerably according to numerous factors, including the type of insurance and car, your age and accident record and where you live. For example, premiums are highest in Paris and other cities and lowest in rural areas; they’re lower for cars over three years old; drivers with less than three years’ experience usually pay a ‘penalty’ and drivers under 25 pay higher premiums.

However, the maximum penalty for young drivers is 100 per cent or double the normal premium. A surcharge is usually made when a car isn’t garaged overnight. Some premiums are based on the number of kilometres ( kilomètrage) driven each year. Always shop around and obtain a number of quotations but beware of companies making ‘special offers’ of low premiums, as your policy may be cancelled if you make a claim!

http://www.justlanded.com/english/France/Articles/Travel-Leisure/Car-ins...

mark_alfred

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Quote:

Premiums

Insurance premiums are high in France – a reflection of the high accident rate, the large number of stolen and vandalised cars, and the high taxes (around 35 per cent) levied on car insurance.

http://www.justlanded.com/english/France/Articles/Travel-Leisure/Car-ins...

The issue in Ontario is that the rates are higher than other jurisdictions in Canada that have higher accident rates than Ontario.  Taxation of them is an interesting issue, though.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

You raised the comparison to France's rates and when it doesn't fit with your thesis you slide sideways and claim they are not even part of the issue. WTF

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

I did not raise the issue of France's auto insurance rates at all.

What I did raise is that in France governments of whatever political stripe have expanded public transit.  They see it as something that's important to do...such that a small city of 250,000 has four tram lines.

I am totally in favour of raising corporate taxes to pay for public transit.   It's one of "the revenue tools" that's at the government's disposal.

But I see no petition on the ONDP website calling for a raise in corporate taxes to pay for public transit...or anything else for that matter.   The only conclustion I can draw from that is that public transit and raising corporate taxes isn't a "priority".

Cutting auto insurance rates by 15% is the only aspect of transportation policy that is important to the ONDP...even though the ONDP had the "keys to the car" and could have implemented public auto insurance two decades ago. 

There have been two major reports released recently on precarious work in the province.   The most recent from the Law Commission of Ontario that calls for a major overhaul of the Employment Standards Act.    The other a study by McMaster University and the United Way released in February.

Where is the "going to the wall" over Ontario's abysmal employment standards legislation?    Where's the online petition?  

Anti-poverty and labour organizations launched a campaign a couple of weeks ago to "unfreeze" Ontario's $10.25 per hour minimum wage.   Where's the "holding the Liberals feet to the fire" on that one?     I did a quick news search on the ONDP and the minimum wage issue and do you know how many hits I found?  Zero.

The Horwath ONDP is a very different one than we had back in 2007.    The pre-Horwath ONDP thought that raising the minimum wage was important.

Michelle

mark_alfred wrote:

How do auto insurance rates in France compare with auto insurance rates here in Ontario?  If France has better regulation of the auto insurance providers thus giving a fairer more affordable deal than here, then that hardly supports your argument.

I fail to see what that has to do with anything at all.  But if you're really interested maybe Google it.  I did, and it looks like France has a system pretty much like ours, and people are saying it's way more expensive than the UK

Gee, too bad they don't have public auto like we do.  Oh wait, that's some other province that has that, not Ontario.  We could have had it, but the ONDP was too busy breaking public sector collective agreements to keep their public auto promise.

Brachina

Andrea wasn't an MPP when Rae was boss and as such should not be blamed for that.

Stockholm

Actually the ONDP has had quite a bit to say about transit. The pledged in the last election to restore consistent long term funding of the TTC and other transit systems and have the province subsidize 50% of transit capital costs and also to contribute to operating costs. For the past 20 years there has been no stable funding of transit in Ontario.

The NDP has also said that expansion of transit needs to funded through revenue tools and that businesses and people at the top should be made to pay a large share of the costs of the Big Move otherwise the public will never buy into the need for all of us to contribute. I agree the Board of Trade is very good at coming up with revenue generating ideas that ding the public and cost business nothing.

I think we are going to soon hear a lot more from Horwath about transit, especially now that Adam Giambrone's seems to be part of her entourage.

mark_alfred

radiorahim wrote:

Cutting auto insurance rates by 15% is the only aspect of transportation policy that is important to the ONDP

I fail to see the connection between policy on public transportation and policy on ensuring fairness from private insurance brokers.  And as Stockholm mentioned the ONDP have plenty to say on public transportation.  I don't know why people get bent out of shape because the provincial NDP is advocating better regulation of insurance brokers or because the federal NDP advocates better regulation of banks (IE, controlling user fees).  Some people deride this as "populist".  I don't get it.  These seem like good things to advocate.

felixr

I agree with those that think the car insurance rate cuts is a weak joke of a policy. Where are the ONDP's policymakers these days?

jerrym

In an Angus Reid poll of 7,091 voters on the popularity of premiers, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne had a 36% approval rating while NDP leader Andrea Horwath had 49%, outranking Progressive Conservative Party leader Tim Hudak at 33%.

Among opposition leaders Dix tied for third place with Ontario's Andrea Horvath behind Lorraine Michael (NDP - Newfoundland) with 61% and Danielle Smith (Alberta -Wildrose) at 53%. 

http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/48733/saskatchewans-wall-keeps-place-as-...

Obviously, many of the NDP leaders across the country are doing well, including Horvath. She is still substantially ahead of Wynne, despite Wynne being in her honeymoon period. 

 

edmundoconnor

Rosario Marchese bangs the drum for a long-overdue condo tribunal:

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2013/04/16/ontario_government_...

janfromthebruce

excellent article Edmund - thanks for posting it.

janfromthebruce

Another nail in the ON Lib coffin - another gas attack!

Brad Duguid advised Liberals in 2011 that scrapping power plant was a bad idea

I advised them . . . I’m not in favour of doing that,” Duguid said, surprising MPPs about his advice on the Mississauga plant cancellation amid community opposition less than two weeks before the vote on Oct. 6, 2011.

“The energy file had been going well during the election. It wasn’t a good time to bring it up.”

Duguid thought he had short-circuited the cancellation plan when the Liberal re-election team called him for input earlier in the campaign. But then came a final call from Sean Mullin, who had been an energy policy adviser campaign in McGuinty’s office, informing Duguid of the top-level decision.

The admission from Duguid — minister of Training, Colleges and Universities under Wynne, who will appear before the committee next week — took opposition MPPs by surprise.

Who gets 1st oppostion critic line - NDP

“This was news to me. The Liberal campaign team was pretty clear: ministers of energy are nice things to have around but not things you use,” said New Democrat MPP Peter Tabuns (Toronto—Danforth).

SNIP

Bentley said he revealed a $265 million figure last July in a press release detailing a deal reached with the plant’s builder.

“We did have the numbers in the window,” insisted Bentley.

Tabuns took exception to that, noting the Liberals repeatedly used the $180 million figure before boosting it to $190 million after lumping in related costs.

NorthReport
NorthReport

Ontario

Date / Event / LI / L-Cg / PC / PC-Cg / ND / ND-Cg

2011 / GE / 42% / -- / 32% / -- / 17% / --

My '13 / IR / 34% / Down 8% / 34% / Up 2%  / 26% / Up 7%

 

 

 

jerrym

Quote:

Andrea Horwath's Ontario NDP Weren't In Position To Force Election, Poll Suggests

With Ontario New Democrats now pledging to pass the minority Liberal government’s budget, voters in the province have been spared an election — at least for the next few months.

A new poll by Ipsos-Reid for CTV and CP24 suggests the New Democrats were not in a strong position to force the province into a snap vote. The online survey of 1,772 Ontarians found Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals and Tim Hudak’s Progressive Conservatives tied at 34 per cent apiece, with Andrea Horwath’s NDP trailing at 26 per cent. 

More worrying for Horwath is the trend: since Ipsos-Reid was last in the field in mid-April, the NDP has slipped three points, as have the Tories. The Liberals are up six.

While the tie might have given Hudak pause in his push to replace the Liberal government, a deeper look at the numbers suggests the PCs could have an intrinsic advantage. Liberals were ahead among voters between the ages of 18 and 54, but the Progressive Conservatives had a 16-point lead among Ontarians 55 or older. As the election results in British Columbia have recently demonstrated, gauging the intentions of actual voters is the real challenge for pollsters — and older people tend to vote in greater numbers.

On the other hand, the Ipsos-Reid poll found that 36 per cent agreed that the “Wynne Government has done a good job and deserves re-election.” In a close three-way race, that may be enough to win.

Nevertheless, the NDP’s budget support is certainly a reprieve for Wynne as the numbers are close enough to put every party’s electoral chances in doubt. ...

The two by-elections should be competitive, with London West potentially a three-way race and Windsor-Tecumseh a close NDP-Liberal battle. Grits will have a tough fight on their hands, as in addition to losing their incumbency advantage the party has taken a hit in the region. Ipsos-Reid pegs Liberal support at only 25 per cent in southwestern Ontario, compared to 34 per cent for the NDP and 35 per cent for the Tories. That represents a swing of roughly 10 points between the Liberals and the NDP since the 2011 election, which alone has the potential to move Windsor-Tecumseh into the NDP’s column and the Liberals behind the PCs in London West.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/05/29/andrea-horwath-ontario-poll_n_33...

The MSM always spins in favour of the Liberals and Cons. The facts are that Andrea has put the NDP back in the ballgame after spinning its wheels since the Rae defeat and part of Wynne's popularity is based on her implementing Andrea's proposals. The governing party typically gets credit for implementing other parties' proposals during a minority government. The NDP has to find a way to motivate young voters so that election results reflect their proportion of the population. I know its not an easy task but it's possible. Jack did motivate a lot of young people to vote and run for office, especially in Quebec. 

The southwestern Ontario poll also shows the NDP highly competitive in the two byelections, where victories could further help the party elsewhere. 

 

toaster

Things aren't looking good for the ONDP in Northern Ontario:

http://www.baytoday.ca/content/news/details.asp?c=52220

"Also in the documents is a memo outlining Liberal strategy, including potential concessions, heading into April 2012 negotiations with the NDP on last year’s budget which put the ONTC for sale.

“The Liberals and NDP need to answer serious questions here – did the Liberals indeed make the offer to Gilles Bisson outlined in the memo? And if so, why did the NDP sell out the ONTC for another of their other southern Ontario priorities?” Fedeli asked.

“For the second year in a row, Andrea Horwath agrees to support the Liberal budget without getting ONE concession on Ontario Northland, while the Ontario PCs stood up for the North to vote against it,” Fedeli added. 

“For her and the NDP to suggest they deserve any credit for slowing the ONTC fire sale is proven by these documents to be absolute nonsense, and couldn’t be further from the truth.”

 

Also, Fedeli has a pres conference schedule tomorrow morning.  Not good for the Northern Ontario caucus, a region the NDP needs to hold (and make gains in) next time around.

jerrym

The latest Forum poll shows Andrea is the most popular leader.

Quote:

In terms of personal popularity, the New Democrat leads with 43 per cent approval, 37 per cent disapproval, and 20 per cent unsure.

By comparison, Wynne has 41 per cent approval, 42 per cent disapproval, and 17 per cent uncertain.

Hudak continues to trail with 26 per cent approval, 57 per cent disapproval, and 17 per cent undecided.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/05/30/poll_ford_problems_help_on...

 

The results of the Ipsos-Reid poll below show why Andrea has helped the NDP improve its poll numbers compared to the previous 20 years.

Quote:

One issue that has received much attention lately in the news media is that of accountability, especially given the gas-plant closure review stemming from the last election. Focusing on these issues and leadership, the data reveal that:

  • Andrea Horwath and the NDP have a slight edge (32%) when it comes to being the most likely party and leader to provide the most transparent, open and accountable government to Ontarians, although Premier Wynne and the Liberals (29%) and Tim Hudak and the PCs (28%) are not far behind. Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner trails (10%).
  • Four in ten (39%) believe that the Liberals would be most likely to waste taxpayer’s money, although the Progressive Conservatives (35%) are not far behind. Fewer believe that the NDP (16%) or Green Party (10%) would be most likely to waste taxpayer’s money.
  • The Tories (34%) have a slight advantage when it comes to being the most likely to protect citizen’s pocketbooks and the taxes they pay, although the gap over the Liberals (30%) and NDP (30%) is small. The Green Party (7%) lags.
  • When it comes to doing the best job of providing social services at reasonable levels of taxation, the NDP (34%) and Liberals (33%) are virtually tied, while the Tories (27%) are slightly behind, with the Green Party (6%) far back.
  • Looking at which of the current opposition parties is most likely to provide the most effective opposition, holding the government to account, the NDP (56%) handily outflanks the Tories (35%) in that category, with the Green Party (9%) behind                      

http://www.ipsos-na.com/news-polls/pressrelease.aspx?id=6127

janfromthebruce

jerrym, Andrea is the only leader with a "positive momentum" score.

NorthReport

 

If they haven't, why didn't these poor people go to Andrea who would have spoken up and lobbied on their behalf?

Don't they realize that the only reason the Liberals changed party leader was to save their political skin, so what you get is the same ole Liberal talk the talk, but NOT walk the talk. And of course all done with a little, or more accurately  with a large amount of help from the Liberal CBC and the Liberal Toronto Star. Games Liberals play, eh!

 

http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/1175643/did-premier-kathleen-wynne-break...

 

 

janfromthebruce

Andrea Horwath wants to study ending corporate, union donations to parties

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath says it’s time to consider doing away with corporate and union donations to provincial political parties.

“It is something that has happened federally . . . it certainly is worth looking at,” she told reporters at Queen’s Park Friday.

Horwath was reacting to a Star story revealing that a Progressive Conservative MPP said he and his colleagues were told by senior party officials that pushing legislation to help a construction company would boost donations to the Tories.

snip

“I am genuinely concerned that we are walking on thin ice” ethically, the member for Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington wrote in his email in May.

There has been no suggestion that EllisDon acted inappropriately and both the company and the Progressive Conservatives strongly deny any wrongdoing.

Tory MPP Monte McNaughton’s private member’s bill received second reading with support from MPPs from the Liberal Party, which has historic ties with EllisDon. The bill is to be referred to a legislative committee for debate.

“I think people raise their eyebrows when they see that political parties — in this case both Liberals and Conservatives are willing to change legislation particularly for one company that has been a generous donor,” Horwath said.

“It’s something that turns people off politics and gives them a sense of distrust about the motivation of policy-makers,” she said.

snip

The federal government, Quebec, Manitoba and the City of Toronto have all banned corporate and union donations. The Ontario Liberal government once entertained the idea but decided against it.

FYI - the NLP campaigned on getting rid of corporate and union donations when first elected in 2003 - 10 years ago - and then did nothing about it. It was a vote getter but since they had big donors like EllisDon they let it drop.

snip

“I am actually extremely proud of this legislation . . . it fits with our modernizing of labour laws. This company entered into an agreement in 1958 with unions in Sarnia and a Labour Relations Board ruling … is forcing EllisDon to hire only unionized employees now right across the province. It’s unfair,” he said.

Make no mistake this is just again about getting rid of unions and good paying wages and moving to a low wage province for both the libs and cons. And I hope it looks at a ceiling on donations. 

Geoff

Before we get on board with this idea, let's make sure that the restrictions on donations have at least an equal impact on corporate donations as they have on union donations.  I always worry that we tie our own hands, leaving too many loopholes for business. 

That Andrea references the ban implemented by the federal Liberals is a bit disconcerting.  I never thought of Chretien and company as a good role model for the NDP on any issue.

Unionist

How very revolutionary.

René Lévesque's government, in its first term, banned political donations by companies, unions, and interest groups, while putting a ceiling on individual donations, and providing public financing of political parties. That was in 1977.

Of course, corruption is still rampant - with companies infamously using "prêt-noms" (don't know how to say it in English) whereby they pressure employees to make individual contributions, and then reimburse them. But at least it's unlawful - and with the Charbonneau Commission, a whole bunch of evildoers are in trouble now.

I'm surprised that such a fundamental democratic principle would still be controversial in 2013. I naively thought that corporate and union donations were only still legal in the U.S.

 

janfromthebruce

Geoff wrote:

Before we get on board with this idea, let's make sure that the restrictions on donations have at least an equal impact on corporate donations as they have on union donations.  I always worry that we tie our own hands, leaving too many loopholes for business. 

That Andrea references the ban implemented by the federal Liberals is a bit disconcerting.  I never thought of Chretien and company as a good role model for the NDP on any issue.

I agree Geoff and is why she said to study it. And it's better late than never (for the revolution).

janfromthebruce

It's obvious the Ontario Liberals are on board with the Conservatives to turn Ontario into a Right to work province. Now that's Bullshit!

jerrym

Quote:
 

Of the three leaders, the NDP’s Andrea Horwath shows the most promise with strong popularity numbers.

The glow around newly-minted Premier Kathleen Wynne has faded after seven months in office.

More people now have a negative impression of her, with 36% viewing her less favourably compared to 31% who have a more positive view of the premier.

The opposite was true in previous polling.

“The longer Premier Wynne has been in power, the less Ontarians seem to like her,” the pollster observed. ...

PC Leader Tim Hudak’s popularity numbers remain weak — 42% of Ontarians polled view him negatively, while only 20% have a positive impression. 

http://www.torontosun.com/2013/09/12/poll-reveals-dead-heat-in-ontario

 

Quote:
 Meanwhile, Andrea Horwath’s positive numbers jumped by five percentage points over the same period to 38%, making her the only leader tested with a net positive score.

http://abacusinsider.com/politics-public-affairs/ontario-politics-tories...

With the new paint job having worn off the Liberals, they have been revealed as the same old gang with the same old problems. Hudak has become a deadweight anchor for his party. While things can rapidly change in politics as new issues grab the publlic's attention, Andrea's large advantage as party leader could be an enormous advantage in an election campaign where, in the modern technologicially driven age, there is so much focus on the leader (one only has to look at the 2011 federal election to see that). 

 

janfromthebruce

Also of note is that Abacus was also commissioned by sun media to do this polling so it was not an NDP friendly pollster.

theleftyinvestor

janfromthebruce wrote:

Also of note is that Abacus was also commissioned by sun media to do this polling so it was not an NDP friendly pollster.

 

Maybe the angle is to force Conservatives to panic about Hudak and force him out.

mark_alfred

Sue Ann Levy, right-wing attack dog of the Toronto Sun, is in full rabid fang-bearing mode against Andrea Horwath (link).  Hilarious.  It's interesting how when the NDP are low in the polls, that the Sun will be relatively friendly in its coverage, while attacking Liberals.  But, as soon as the NDP is close to both the Liberals and Conservatives, the Sun shows its true colours.  While Levy favours the Conservatives, clearly to her the Liberals are right-wing enough to be acceptable, but not the NDP.  They're too progressive, which sends Levy into fits of rage like this article.  It will be good to watch her head explode when Andrea becomes premier.

janfromthebruce

theleftyinvestor wrote:

janfromthebruce wrote:

Also of note is that Abacus was also commissioned by sun media to do this polling so it was not an NDP friendly pollster.

 

Maybe the angle is to force Conservatives to panic about Hudak and force him out.

Not sure but I think that strategically it may not be a good move - if Hudak stepped down the Libs could well pull the plug sooner rather than the spring. Either way there isn't enough time for Cons to do this. And I don't think that is what is going on.

mark_alfred

Good article in the Star today (2013/09/16) from Rosario Marchese about the Ontario Municipal Board.  He claims it has both judiciary powers and policy/law setting powers, which he feels is a conflict.  From my read of it, he says the current Liberal government removed the last legal power of elected representatives at Queen's Park over this unelected body.

janfromthebruce

OMB: Unelected and unaccountable fourth branch of government

excerpt:

This is why I have introduced a private member’s bill at Queen’s Park to set Toronto free from the OMB and put local land use and planning policy back into the hands of a locally elected government. Planning appeals would still be heard, either by the courts or by a new municipal appeals body, should the city choose to establish one.

I hope that such changes will build momentum for further OMB reforms that will benefit all municipalities.

Totally agree with Rosario

The biggest myth about the OMB is that it is an appeals body, defending the rule of law from meddling politicians or NIMBY residents. If this were the whole story, the OMB would not be as controversial as it is.

Here’s what makes the OMB so unique: while the OMB does have adjudicative powers, like a court of appeal, it also has policy-making powers, like a government ministry. This is profoundly undemocratic.

snip

his may explain why the government has still not joined the Waterloo Region appeal, five months after it pledged to do so. A defeat would offer embarrassing proof that the government has bungled the OMB file.

This madness must end. The government must take immediate action to restore democratic accountability to planning policy in Ontario, and rein in once and for all the unelected and unaccountable OMB.

Rosario Marchese is the MPP for Trinity-Spadina riding in Toronto.

In rural areas, we couldn't control factory pig farms where the "run off" into the rivers, lakes and streams is polluting the water and making some areas near shore "unswimable".  Next, municipalities wanted to create wider set backs for industrial wind turbines but overruled by OMB. It's no surprise here that one sees an unelected body make decisions that effect the local populations and not a darn thing that can be done except change the law.

NorthReport

It's time for an election in Ontario - please pull the plug Andrea. After all, who is running things, you or the Liberal Toronto Star. 

Fall election in Ontario unlikely despite Hudak’s pleas for a vote over $1.1B gas plant fiascoOntario voters will not be going to the polls this year over the Liberals’ $1.1 billion gas plant debacle.

http://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2013/10/09/hudak_urges_ndp_to_hel...

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture
Aristotleded24

Horwath is trying very hard to send this back into Wynne's court, and for Wynne to be seen as being responsible for the election call, rather than people see the Opposition as toppling the government.

janfromthebruce

NorthReport wrote:

It's time for an election in Ontario - please pull the plug Andrea. After all, who is running things, you or the Liberal Toronto Star. 

Fall election in Ontario unlikely despite Hudak’s pleas for a vote over $1.1B gas plant fiascoOntario voters will not be going to the polls this year over the Liberals’ $1.1 billion gas plant debacle.

http://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2013/10/09/hudak_urges_ndp_to_hel...

Understanding the goverance system in Ontario would be a good start NR: FYI, a non goverance motion can only come to fruitation until all 3 parties in the legislature agree. http://parliamentum.org/2013/05/23/the-confidence-convention-in-ontario-how-the-standing-orders-kept-the-wynne-government-in-power/

I'd much rather make sure that the Liberals wear this for a long long time. Oh, I much rather be ready to call a snap election.

Pages

Topic locked