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NorthReport

China’s Relentless Campaign to Pave the Coast

'They’re completely industrializing the coastal ecosystem.’

While the development isn’t expected to have a direct environmental effect outside of China, the massive reclamation work could be of global significance within the coming century, Fletcher adds. While low-lying reclaimed lands might initially absorb some of China’s population growth, rising sea levels could mean that they ultimately contribute to a worldwide flood of climate refugees.

“These are lands,” Fletcher says, “that are going to have to be abandoned.”  [Tyee]


http://thetyee.ca/News/2016/07/28/China-Pave-Coast/

NorthReport
Sean in Ottawa

ikosmos wrote:

Mop and Pail wrote:
Then there is the Arctic Ocean, where China has – so far – respected the fishing and continental shelf rights of the five coastal states. But if China rejects the application of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea in Asia, can any country rely on it respecting those same promises in the Arctic?

bwa ha ha ha. What an example! Russia, for example, supports Canada in protecting what it views as an inland waterway, through Arctic waters. For Canada, it's the NorthWest Passage, for Russia it's the NorthEast Passage, although they call it something else.

Guess what stinking Empire opposes both? BZZZZ! Wrong! Not China. The USA. oh yeah.

Actually this is wrong. China and the US both agree on this.

For China it is hypocritical given how impossible it is to line up the principles between their nine-dash claim and their view that the Arctic is international.

I know that there are a lot of defenders of China here. I have at times been one of them.

However, increasingly China is taking an aggressive imperial view of the world. In  many respects the Chinese are following a US blueprint (which is the reason US complaints about China so often smell of hypocrisy). Both countries had an inward period, a sanctimonious vision and pursuit of their raw interests.

There is nothing right or left about this and the fact that China does this under a socialist banner is meaningless.

The approach to the world from China and the US are full of distinctions without differences.

I recognize that the US remains the more powerful in terms of military and so in this particular cold-war vision China is the underdog. But rather than deliver all sympathy to that underdog, perhaps it is worth considering all the small nations bullied by any empire in history as more deserving.

It is important to see the conflict between the China and its neighbours in the context of US imperialism, but it is not necessary to view China as innocent in terms of its behaviour towards its neighbours. This is one of those many international issues where binary responses are most unhelpful. It is after all not that unusual that one bully bullies another and that both bully everyone else.

NorthReport

China appears to be setting itself up for trouble of its own making

The Chinese just showed up one day off the Philippine Coast and told the Filipinos that they could not fish in their own coastal waters and they have physically enforced that edict The Philippines have just won a court ruling that the Chinese were wrong but the Chinese are now thumbing their nose at that decision
Many other countries in the area are feeling bullied by China as well

Also you have the North Korean situation so it's no wonder Japan wants to have a military

The USA is moving 60% of their Navy into the Pacific and rebuilding bases in Asia, but realistically what alternative does the USA have?

Sean in Ottawa

NorthReport wrote:
China appears to be setting itself up for trouble of its own making The Chinese just showed up one day off the Philippine Coast and told the Filipinos that they could not fish in their own coastal waters and they have physically enforced that edict The Philippines have just won a court ruling that the Chinese were wrong but the Chinese are now thumbing their nose at that decision Many other countries in the area are feeling bullied by China as well Also you have the North Korean situation so it's no wonder Japan wants to have a military The USA is moving 60% of their Navy into the Pacific and rebuilding bases in Asia, but realistically what alternative does the USA have?

Of course the question is in the present. The US certainly had other alternatives before getting to the point that became the world's self-appointed ruler.

An argument can be made that the US has no business in the area even though the Chinese are wrong. It is not a contradiction to say both empires are wrong and one's reaction to the other is not helpful in the long term.

If I say that the US should not be controlling the area or sailing through it aggressively with armed vessels, that does not mean that I endorse or agree with China's position.

In fact, the US not being there in the way it is certainly removes some of the justification for China's aggression. This is an armed posturing between two big powers after all.

We have a loaded situation and I agree the US cannot just vanish without creating instability. This aggressive posture has to be taken back bit by bit over time with pressure that the otherside do the same. China is a player in the world economy and is not immune to pressure -- there are things it wants. It is not at all clear to me that one kind of force must be presented with the identical kind. The idea that China is overstepping is contradicted in many respects when a country as far as the US is competing in the area.

Again, I see no need to take sides between imperial forces.

NorthReport

Chinese little green men just like the Russians in Eastern Ukraine, eh!

So how many countries is it now?

Japan
Philippines
Taiwan
Vietnam

Who else?

https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2016-08-31/china-s-little-green-...

NDPP

The Coming War on China...(and vid)

https://www.rt.com/shows/going-underground/369108-john-pilger-china-film/

"We speak to award winning journalist and film-maker John Pilger about his newest film, The Coming War on China."

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Pilger's film is going to be shown on RT and their documentary channel, RTD, on Dec 9, 10, and 11.

Wow.

NDPP

Can Russia Stand By As Trump Goes After China?   -   by Rostislav Ishchenko

http://www.fortruss.com/2017/01/can-russia-stand-by-and-trump-goes-after...

"As long as China is on the list of the American administration's military priorities, even if Washington demonstrates friendliness towards Russia, there can be no talk of the US refraining from aggressive policies of global hegemony.

Instead, we are dealing with a transfer of the main blow from the Russian to the Chinese flank. This means we can feel temporary relief only deceptively. This does not reduce the common threat.

Moscow can in no way stand by and watch as Trump tries to destroy its strategic partner in Asia."

NDPP

The Coming War With China: John Pilger Q&A

https://youtu.be/k1Yx8-qynnY

"We don't have a new enemy. Maybe the enemy's within...? This is a completely artificial situation."

NDPP

Prominent Chinese Economist Warns Country's Debt Becoming Problem

https://on.rt.com/8kqx

"Everyone knows there's a credit problem in China, but I find that people often forget about the scale. It's important in global terms,' Chu said in an interview with the Financial Times.

Chu, who made her name warning of the risks from China's credit binge, has predicted that by the end of the year, the country will accumulate $7.6 trillion worth of so-called 'bad' debt.

The comments came the day after the IMF warned that Chinese debt could be the reason for the next financial crisis as borrowing becomes more unsustainable."

Sean in Ottawa

The Chinese system is different in that the government can take unilateral action in a way most countries cannot. Nobody can be sure what an economic crisis might look like. Nobody can be sure what this economic and political system can take on in terms of debt. The limits other countries have are not the same.

This could lead to miscalculation. However, it may be that what they have done will work.

By creating a middle class in a short time they have created a domestic economy in a generation that could be used to manage an international financial crisis over their debt. The government is less reliant on the outside than it has been and it has a massive scale in terms of positives as well as negatives.

It takes a third of GDP to service the debt but the Chinese have bet on growth and have time even if it stalls for a time. Government debt is largely to corporations but many of those are state-owned. Another chunk is to households who can be prevented from calling on that debt for a time

Another point is that the debt to GDP of China is growing quickly but is well below most other large countries such as the US, Germany and Japan. The Chinese state owned companies are worth a tremendous amount of money and in theory could be sold if needed.

So: While Chinas debt is growing it has had significant boosts in GDP and assets behind it. It has a system that leaves a lot of power in the government to make changes.

Now if you compare the political stability of China in the long term you can raise questions but in the short term it looks better off than most coutries including the US. China's economic approach are not likely to be changed by a short term political change as could happen in the US which even has a debt ceiling to contend with. The Chinese people may have lower expectations in terms of wealth, even as their elites take what they can, most people may remain modest in expectation.

I doubt that it is fair to suggest that China is the weak link in the global economy.

I think there are two global forces: technology which can continue to displace people. Countries with less flexibility and governmetn control may be less able to deal with this. The second is environmental.. It is possible that as we continue to get into an environmental crisis a centrally planned economy might be better positioned to address this.

We cannot be sure of its bottom line situation as there is nothing to compare to, but there are arguments that China's economic position is better than many others that we worry much less about.

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