babble-intro-img
babble is rabble.ca's discussion board but it's much more than that: it's an online community for folks who just won't shut up. It's a place to tell each other — and the world — what's up with our work and campaigns.

I planted a new gardening thread

Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

I know, I know. Get off my back, will you? I should be planting beans or brassicas or something. My garlic is poking through, isn't that enough?

To be honest, it's the potatoes I'm worried about. Get them in the ground already!


Comments

Slumberjack
Offline
Joined: Aug 8 2005

I so look forward to outdoor plantings after a winter of hydro.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

I'm two months away from planting here.


Michelle
Offline
Joined: May 10 2001

I have little perennials poking up in the front postage stamp.  Still pretty threadbare looking, but it was kind of neat to see the stuff I planted last year coming up again.


MegB
Offline
Joined: Nov 28 2001

It's been so freakishly warm here in London I could've planted stuff last week, but who knows what kind of weather is coming down the pipe.  Will this April still be the cruellest month?  I'm pleased, confused and mortified.


MegB
Offline
Joined: Nov 28 2001

Garlic can be really invasive.  Not as much as thyme, but still needs to be cultivated.


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Garlic you plant in October. Each clove you plant (point end up) will (should) yield a whole bulb come early summer. You also get scapes in spring to eat. I haven't had a problem with it being invasive, but I always harvest the entire crop which will usually last the whole season if you don't eat it. Then you can plant what you have left for next year.


Michelle
Offline
Joined: May 10 2001

Hey, if it's invasive, I should plant some cloves of it in the city portion of the front lawn (in the grass between the sidewalk and street).  That could be fun!


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Seeds straight from your fridge

Re-growing celery (also works for romaine and bok choy, apparently!)

Re-growing green onions (or leeks or any cooking onion!)


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

The sun is up - finally! - but the ground is still too frozen to work here. Still snow on the ground, and puddles of water everywhere. We need a month of warm weather before we can garden here.


6079_Smith_W
Online
Joined: Jun 10 2010

Yup. 

Don't try it with biennials like carrots or parsnips though, unless you just want a bunch of seed . 

And really, who wants to grow parsnips anyway, for any reason other than that mentioned in the first chapter of Margaret Craven's book?

I'm tossing the end of a 50 pound onion bag into the ground this week.

Even better, ginger and turmeric can be stored just as easily in a pot of soil  as in the fridge. 

(edit)

I am surprised that despite our non-winter, the garden is not quite ready for planting anything other than roots, tubers  and legumes. Four years ago I had tomatoes in the ground a few weeks before this. A few late snows and freezes is the difference. I don't mind though, because it all means a bit more water in the ground, and we didn't get much snow this year.

 


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

Question: what would be great ground cover for land beside the road? Every spring folks drive on the land border to avoid potholes and deep water.


6079_Smith_W
Online
Joined: Jun 10 2010

You mean to help cars get around? I have always thought cobblestones or whatever those roadways made out of blocks of wood is called to be best.

 


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

Ha! No, I would like a natural ground cover to protect the land from the occasional tires in the spring. Hardy grasses, weeds, whatever. The regular grass I planted there has now disappeared and is mostly sand - looks terrible. I want something green that can stand some punishment such as vehicles driving over it once in a while. There's very little topsoil - it's mostly sand.

 


macktheknife
Offline
Joined: Jun 7 2012

I planted a ...Boom Boom! I'm sorry but my humour runs to the juvenile.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

I have very bad osteo/arthritis in both hands, but still managed to plant my tiny greenhouse today. I should have over 200 carrots and about 50 cucumbers if all goes well.

My main veggie garden - it's huge - went kaput last year because of weeds. Tomorrow I'm going to try to clear a small portion of it, and plant radishes, lettuce, and beets (not all will grow, though). About 50 of each. But, first, I have a hell of a lot of weeds to pull - and that's the tough part for me.


janfromthebruce
Offline
Joined: Apr 24 2007

Boom Boom when you plant your garden this year, why don't you make raised beds and put straw down so you keep the weeds down. And once the plants get big enough put straw around them too to keep the weeds down. That will be easier on your osteo/arthritis and also keep the moisture in. Just a thought.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

Yes, that's a great idea, and one I've considered for a while. Someone here builds big gardening boxes for senior citizens, and I'm waiting my turn. Can't get straw here, though. When I start the housing renovations soon, there's a big wooden box that the new door came in, and I'll use that - next year - unless it gets here really soon.


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

I've always wanted to grab straw for mulching my garden but I find it hard to come by. I should talk to my neighbour because he puts some down in the spring, but he caught me stealing one of his snap peas last summer (they looked so nice, I just wanted to see what they were like! He's such a good gardner) so I've been reluctant to approach him since. (*blush*)

Right now I have no idea what my garden looks like. I'm on the road out east and I have an amateur looking after it for me. It's mostly peas and potatoes, so I'm hoping he won't have much to do. The raspberry trellis was about to explode when I left, as where the strawberry bushes. Hopefully there will be some berries left for me when I get home!


Ghislaine
Offline
Joined: Feb 15 2008

Our garden is looking great due to an amazing early spring. 

Potatoes, peas, beets, beans, onions, cilantro, carrots, turnips, romaine....all are up and looking huge!

I think we should have potatoes any day now :)

It is so exciting! 


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Awesome, Ghislaine -- well, except for the turnips ;) Garden potatoes are one of my favourite things. Add peas and purple sprouting broccoli and you have my perfect garden.


Ghislaine
Offline
Joined: Feb 15 2008

Catchfire, turnips are good! 

Have you ever cut them in cubes and roasted them with a little brown sugar? You cannot harvest until after a few frosts. 

I forgot I have parsnips too :) We love those in the ground until next spring. 


Michelle
Offline
Joined: May 10 2001

We finally tackled the jungle in the backyard this year.  radiorahim made an attempt last year, but this is the year we really did something about it.  Due to benign neglect over the past few years, the entire backyard lawn was given over to more weeds than grass, and the weeds grow as tall as us in just a few short weeks, even after cutting them back!

So, this year, we decided to do sheet mulching in most of the backyard, except for the sides where we've let the more or less wanted stuff keep growing. For those who aren't familiar with sheet mulching, here's what we did.

radiorahim cut the weeds/grass with the lawnmower everywhere.  Then we laid down landscaping fabric over the lawn and pegged it down.  Then we got 20 bags of that cedar chip mulch stuff, and put a 2 inch layer over the landscape fabric.  What this does is makes it really hard for the grass and weeds to grow because the landscape fabric (which is black and a bit rubbery, but also breathes and lets water through it) doesn't allow any light, so the weeds just die and compost under it.  At least, that's the theory, although I understand that some hardy weeds do sometimes manage to poke through.

So, what I described above is what you do if you don't necessarily want to plant anything in the space you're trying to sheet mulch, and we don't, for now. We may decide to at some later time, in which case, we can always just clear away some of the mulch and create a raised bed on top of it.

If you do want to plant in the area you're mulching, here's a good way of sheet mulching that apparently works great (I haven't tried it but my mom has): Mow down the weedy or grassy area where you want to make your gardening bed, and leave the clippings in place.  Cover the area and clippings with really good compost, concentrated if you can.  Then cover it completely with cardboard, not leaving any gaps - make sure you overlap well where two pieces of cardboard meet.  Then put a good, thick layer of seed-free compost and soil down on the cardboard.  Then put a top layer of mulch, which could be dead leaves, twigs, or the wood chips I mentioned above.  And then you can start planting right away in it!

The cardboard will ensure that the weeds beneath it don't get any light to grow, and the compost under the cardboard will help the weed clippings and roots decompose quickly.  The cardboard itself will eventually decompose, after the weeds are dead, and then eventually you have a nice rich composted soil layer under your new soil and mulch.  Again, weeds will come back eventually since the seeds are always blowing in the wind here and there but it's a good way to start from scratch if you have a completely uncontrolled weed problem, and the top layer of mulch will be more discouraging to weeds than open soil.


Michelle
Offline
Joined: May 10 2001

Boom Boom, one of the things my mom puts down for ground cover in well-walked areas (e.g. between the cracks of patio stones) is creeping thyme.  Not sure if it's hardy enough for vehicle tires, but you never know.  It's pretty darn hardy, though, from what I've seen, and it's also pretty and smells nice.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

Thanks Michelle, I'll look into that.  I'm also trying to get a local contractor bring a load of topsoil so I can raise the edge of the property a bit to discourage folks from driving on it in the spring when the snow melts. Every spring it's an awful mess here - no sewer grates, so the water from  melting snow just accumulates and eventually flows into my yard.


Michelle
Offline
Joined: May 10 2001

Might want to ensure they're good for your zone.  I forget which zone you're in - I looked up Sept Isles and it was Zone 3, but I'm not sure how far away from that you are. Ideal zone for creeping thyme is 4-8, but who knows, maybe there's a good hardy variety out there that can withstand zone 3.

Also, have you considered maybe doing some sort of rock garden feature there, with large rocks and hardy stuff growing in them?  Could be pretty, and no one's going to drive through a pile of rocks!

P.S. Interesting bit of trivia: Iceland's hardiness zones are 7 on the coastlines and 6 inland. Weird for such a northerly country, huh?  But their trees take decades to grow and mature.  We saw trees there that looked like 10 year-old trees here, and we were told they took 30 or 40 years to get to that stage.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

Yeah, I've already put a few rocks there, will add more soon. My zone is 3A... will have to look for a different ground cover, but there's lots at the link you provided.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004
There are folks here with really spectacular gardens - mine is smaller, but I'm happy with it. :garden

Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

Sure is taking the lilies - and other flowers here - a long time to bloom, but there's a lot of them, the stems are long, and with another week or two of warm sunny weather, this place is going to be spectacular. The bushes (hostas) are in full bloom with shiny leaves and have spread throughout the garden. Not bad for a very difficult gardening area.


Michelle
Offline
Joined: May 10 2001

Hostas are amazing.  No work, they like the shade, they're perennials, and they're pretty.


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

Yeah, I'm going to have a whole bunch more next year. Veseys sells a new breed of hostas that actually flowers.


Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or register to post comments