What was the best in-flight meal to you?

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angeliclight
What was the best in-flight meal to you?

 

Korean Air unveiled its new in-flight meal of dongchimi guksoo (cold noodle soup with radish water kimchi), and yeongyangbap (steamed grains and rice) The meal will be offered from next month to first and prestige class passengers on long-haul flights to the US and Europe. Korean food due to its unique ingredients and scent, can be used in a limited manner for in-flight meals. But Korean Air is making efforts to develop new menu items to spread the popularity of Korean food throughout the world.

Dongchimi receives the most attention. Korean Air has served just white kimchi (kimchi without red pepper powder) due to the sensitivity of foreign passengers to smell. Since demand is growing to increase the diversity of kimchi on the menu, Korean air chose white kimchi because it is a traditional food that is not eaten daily.

Korean air offers bibimbap, samgyetang (ginseng chicken soup), ox tail soup, steamed rice with Gondrae herb and crab marinated in soy sauce since 1997. Korean Air has received many awards for best quality in-flight meals since 1998.

If you ever get a chance to fly Korean Air, I recommend that you try some in-flight Korean meals.

 

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Michelle

Sounds good, but I don't think I could ever afford to fly first class, on any airline.  Anything similar for coach passengers?

lagatta

There are entire websites devoted to rating good ... and bad airline meals.

I doubt we will have the chance to get bumped into first class on an overbooked flight any more. It happened to me once, on an Air France flight to Paris, but that was 20 years ago. Now they pretty much auction such perks off; you have to pay a surcharge. Suppose it is still a great bargain but I'm not about to pay even a couple of hundred dollars or euros for a more comfortable flight and better food - I have a very limited budget (to put it mildly) and would far rather enjoy a good meal with friends at my destination.

So obviously that was the best in-flight meal I've ever had, but it was nothing out of the ordinary. We could have all the champagne we could drink (hmm this reminds me of another thread) but the best perk of all had nothing to do with food or drink: it was the seat that became a full-length cot (at least for me; I'm not tall). So I arrived refreshed. They also gave all the ladies a red rose upon arrival.

The rich people who usually enjoy such treatment were certainly not averse to indulging in champagne...

Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airline_meal Airlinemeals.net and airplanefood.net are among the many websites devoted to this. You will also find endless discussions on travel boards such as the Lonely Planet Thorn Tree.

Unionist

Crab marinated in soy sauce since 1997? Talk about preparation time!

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

"best in-flight meal" is another oxymoron, on the same scale as "Alberta culture".

 

(not meant to be taken as a slight to Alberta, by the way)

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Boom Boom please stop or you may start getting comments about the "nation" you live in.  You humour was barely palatable once this week but it is now once too many.

Trust me as a BC'er I have lots of nasty little jokes about Alberta but I refrain from them just as I refrain from Newfie jokes and Blue Noser jokes and Quebec jokes. 

Slumberjack

I had a memorable box lunch that had some particularly tasty items in it while aboard a 7 hour herc flight one time.  There was a cold, bbq pork chop wrapped in cellophane, coleslaw, a sandwich bag containing carrots, celery, and a packet of caesar salad dressing to use as dip, salmon salad sandwich, an apple, an orange, orange juice and milk, a package of oreos and a chocolate pudding.  The air force was known to pack solid fare into their box lunches.  It was memorable because in the month prior to that event my dining had been exclusively limited to military boil-a-bag rations (IMPs).  Our blessings were relayed through the flight crew to the food services personnel.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

No doubt that the best in flight meal was the one I ate when I got upgraded to First Class 15 years ago.  The last couple of years I eat the mixed nuts because I'll be damned if I will pay for shitty food and most cheap flights charge extra for the crap they serve.

onlinediscountanvils

There was this one time the flight attendant let me have the cookies and the Bits & Bites!

 

But of course, nothing beats Spam. Wink

lagatta

I can certainly understand why slumberjack appreciated that meal!

Well, Korean spam, of course. And very odd product placement, with an audience unlikely indeed to opt for first class, if they ever happened to use that airline.

The food on KLM transatlantic flights (in budget) is perfectly decent, which I think is about as good as one can hope for on such a carrier.

I always wonder whether it would be a better idea to opt for one of the "special meals". Though I'd probably want the halal one (as I love Middle Eastern food)and then would be thought very strange indeed as I opted to drink red wine with it.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Boom Boom please stop or you may start getting comments about the "nation" you live in.  You humour was barely palatable once this week but it is now once too many.

Trust me as a BC'er I have lots of nasty little jokes about Alberta but I refrain from them just as I refrain from Newfie jokes and Blue Noser jokes and Quebec jokes. 

I grew up hearing Quebec-bashing all the time - very, very rarely have I heard any joking about Alberta. Even from Quebecers. But I take your point.

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

I flew Porter this summer and they gave me a beer for free. And a sandwich, but like a pleb, I had already eaten. Also like a pleb, I took it anyway.

genobalto

Korean Air was the best in-flight meal I had, ever! I was on economy, but the food was first class for sure. If you guys ever plan to visit Korea, check out Korean Air. Pretty awesome service/food.

lagatta

I've reported the above comment (not as "offensive", of course, but pretty clearly spam). Funny that these were both new posters. And you are wasting your time; there is no particular market for your airline on this board.

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Spammers let me know that every day the world becomes more magical and more unexpected.

6079_Smith_W

My grandfather worked for Air Canada, as did my dad for a time when he was in university. We had cutlery and little bottles and other stuff all over our house when we were kids.

 

The thing about spamming is it can work both ways:

http://www.amazon.com/Avery-Durable-Binder-EZ-Turn-17032/product-reviews...

onlinediscountanvils

In post #11 Catchfire wrote:
I flew Porter this summer and they gave me a beer for free. And a sandwich

 

In post #12 lagatta wrote:
I've reported the above comment (not as "offensive", of course, but pretty clearly spam).

 

Good eye, lagatta. For shame, Catchfire. For shame. Tongue out

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

onlinediscountanvils

LOL!

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I used to get good sandwiches on short hauls around the south and southwest, but that was a decade ago. Air Canada is just typical airline food. I can't remember the name of the airline I flew when I came here in 1995, it went bankrupt - but it had better food than Air Canada.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Probably Canadian Airlines.  I always flew it in preference to Air Canada.  When Air Canada was privatized its main aim seemed to have been driving its competition out of business to create a monopoly.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Yes! Canadian Airlines. You have a good memory. We really miss them here.

MegB

Last flight I was on was Westjet, to a conference in Winnipeg.  Aircraft of dubious age, super cool flight crew, and edible food. Then again, if I'm hungry enough I'll eat deep-fried gopher ...

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Rebecca West wrote:
 Aircraft of dubious age, super cool flight crew, and edible food.

Our regular aircraft here are DH Twin Otters of 1967 - 1975 vintage. Loud as hell, drafty, but able to carry a substantial load and take off and land on our short runways. In the larger villages, they are serviced by Beechcraft I estimate to be 1985 - 1995 vintage.

lagatta

I've taken those too - up in Nunavik. It is another world, eh?

No food on those planes, but I've received yummy caribou from folks living up there.

MegB

First plane I was ever on was a single engine Cessna.  Normally a 4-seater, the rear seats had been removed to accommodate people with parachutes attached to a static line.  The door had also been removed because you needed to step out onto the wing strut and then jump.

Weirdly enough, I've never felt safer in a plane than the one I jumped out of.  In-flight meals were not to be had, but there was an excellent pub not far from the jump site.

bagkitty bagkitty's picture

Airline food, really, I am hard pressed to understand why anyone who is not flying between continents cares that much. I almost always used to refuse meals when they were offered to me on flights anyway (much to the consternation of the in-flight staff) -- and I never collapsed from hunger on account of having done so. If my metabolism was such that I would find a four hour flight hard to deal with without eating something, I would prefer to bring my own "snack". I guess serving food on flights serves some purpose... keeps passengers in their seats and reduces their boredom... but a good book does much the same. What comes to mind when I think of airline meals is the appallingly bad behaviour on the part of passengers regarding such meals. Makes me wish the flight attendants had the option of physically ejecting some passengers during the course of the flight - sans parachutes.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

My first flight - ever - was to Thunder Bay from Toronto in 1980, on an Air Canada jet.

Since then I've been on close to 200 airline flights, including about 70 helicopter trips here on the Lower North Shore of Quebec. I love helicopters, especially when I'm up front staring out that huge bubble.

A bush pilot friend of mine here had an old Cessna 180 floatplane in which he invested close to a million dollars in rebuilding - engine, electrical, navigation systems - everything, and we've landed and taken off on the waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence many times. In the winter, he traded the floats for skiis, and, again, we have taken off and landed all up and down the coast.  Great fun - I wish I had gone for a pilot's license in my youth.

Fidel

I was flown in and out of a few bush jobs by Viking helicopter services up around Marathon to T-Bay, Hornepayne etc. And sometimes the pilots were very sober in the morning and didn't even cowboy it very much. Those were the best flights early in the am because ambush re-breakfasts tended not to sneak up on you if you know what I mean. Good pilots, though. That was back in the 1980's when it was still sort of okay to drink and fly choppers I suppose.

ETA: Yah Porter's pretty good. First time latte for me at Toronto Island AP just a couple years ago. First rate Canadian airline.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I've never flown to Hornepayne, but I drove there from Hearst and Constance Lake First Nation quite a few times in the 1990s. Scary roads up there, what with logging trucks and all.

Fidel

Yeah scary roads for sure. That 20 kliks of winding "highway" between Thessalon and Chapleau seems longer in winter with a logging truck riding your derriere. Truckers up there are friendly that way. Glad I'm not doing that one anymore.

Hornepayne and Constance Lake? What were you doing up that way, Boom Boom? 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

It's forever a secret. I could tell you, but then I'd have to... well, you know. :spy

Fidel

Ah, those guys again. Yikes!  Sealed

Mr.Tea

When flying, it's always a good idea to order the kosher meal (whether you actually keep kosher or not). It's usually better and you also get it first. I only remember being actually impressed by one airline meal and that was on Czech Air, flying from Prague to Toronto. I do like the snacks on Jet Blue and Porter is nice in that they give you free beer on the plane and their lounge in Toronto has free coffee, snacks and wi-fi, which is appreciated.

I've actually had pretty decent meals on Via Train rides.

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

Wasn't a meal but I got free drinks one time on a flight home (way back when airlines still did that)... Nothing like getting off the airplane three sheets to the wind to be greeted by your parents. 

NDPP

...a nice fat blue grouse brought down 'in'flight' with a old Cooey .22, plucked and pan fried with  lemon, garlic, a little red wine and a drizzle of maple syrup - over an open fire of old sagebrush in the hills behind Summerland BC, years ago. With half a baguette to dip in the pan-juices,  the good local bottle-minus-drizzle, and what with an equally congenial local herbal accompaniment, it was a bush meal to remember..from what I can remember...

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

I mostly can't remember airline food.    I guess one can only remember if it was fairly good i.e. smoked fish and cavier on an Aeroflot trans Atlantic flight back in the 1980's ... or fairly bad...a disgusting little sandwich on a British Airways flight between northern Italy and London Gatwick.

I was on one airline a few years ago that had a "no booze" policy...Aerosvit...the Ukrainian national airline.

MegB

Mr.Tea wrote:

When flying, it's always a good idea to order the kosher meal (whether you actually keep kosher or not).
B

I've actually had pretty decent meals on Via Train rides.


I feel the same way about buying meat that is kosher or halal.

The only Via meal I 've eaten that was halfway decent was when I traveled Via One. The food you buy in economy is awful and over-priced. Makes more sense to pack a lunch.

lagatta

I always pack a lunch for the train. If one should not have time to pack a lunch before leaving the Montreal Central railway station, there is a good selection of takeaway shops; one does lovely pita sandwiches, salads, Middle-Eastern stuff and isn't very expensive. (Psst, if you want to feel decadent, there is even a small SAQ (=LCBO) and they sell those little 250ml screw-top bottles of Côtes-du-Rhône....). Good coffee, too.

One is very limited packing airplane food by all the restrictions, and they can always decide to throw your lovingly packed lunch away...

The best butcher near here is halal. Their chicken is all locally-reared and killed, and has a nice, deep flavour.

MegB

There isn't much by way of decent food at the London Via station (unless you really like vending machine crap), but Union Station has a place that has the best wraps I've ever tasted.

The wine to be had on Via economy is your basic house wine - not at all good, but not completely undrinkable.  

When I was 19, my Mum and I took a train to Quebec City for a one-week vacation.  We got chummy with a group of older women, and one of them carried an actual martini kit. She mixed the best martinis I've ever tasted (and I really don't like gin), and I got the feeling that these women, long-time friends, traveled often with martini kit in hand. I had such a good time. They had such energy, and such a wonderful "I'm at an age where I no longer give a shit about what anyone else thinks".  

It was good for Mum who, despite her communist upbringing was hard core bourgeois and cared far too much about appearances. For my ignorant 19 year old self, I got a view into how actually wonderful it would be to grow older.  And now I'm there.

bagkitty bagkitty's picture

VIA? I have heard tale of VIA... it is a train thing, right? We don't have it here. It seems more important that rail transport be made available to places in Central Canada than, say, Canada's fourth largest city.

 

6079_Smith_W

Too bad you don't live up in Edmonton bagkitty. Getting between here and Winnipeg in the offseason on VIA is cheaper than going by bus. It was $49 one way last winter

Funny thing is, last time I was at the station, they still had maps up from 30 years ago, before they shut down the southern line.

But do you think anyone's going to ride a train in Calgary (except some sort of drive-on train, maybe)? I don't think anyone even uses the sidewalks in that town. Oh - except the time I was stopped and ordered by the cops to get off the street and out of the way of the cars and ride my bike on the sidewalk.

</joke>

 

 

lagatta

Still, the southern route should have been kept. I hope things are changing a bit in Calgary with the new mayor.

I guess if there are really no pedestrians, the sidewalks could become cycle paths!

6079_Smith_W

@ lagatta

Absolutely. I took one of the last trains to Regina (91?) before the shutdown. It should all have been kept, especially considering there are places out here you can only get to by train.

And I was joking; I know Calgarians have feet. The bit about the cops was not a joke though.

Actually back to the food thing, part of what I find interesting about airplane food is that, like some cafeteria food, and old TV dinners, its more like toy food than real food. I certainly don't judge it like real food, and in that sense, I usually enjoy it.

 

oldgoat

Rebecca West wrote:

First plane I was ever on was a single engine Cessna.  Normally a 4-seater, the rear seats had been removed to accommodate people with parachutes attached to a static line.  The door had also been removed because you needed to step out onto the wing strut and then jump.

Weirdly enough, I've never felt safer in a plane than the one I jumped out of.  In-flight meals were not to be had, but there was an excellent pub not far from the jump site.

 

Ditto for me.  Can I ask when and where you jumped?  My first jump was from this Norseman in Orange Mass., but I was up for rides in my sisters club Cessna prior to that.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

My mum and I watched the very last train leave Ottawa's Union Station downtown opposite the Chateau Laurier. I can't remember if we actually were on the train or just watched it leave - it was so long ago, I think 1969. Union Station is now a government convention centre, and the railway station has moved to Alta Vista. From the old Union Station, you could walk a short tunnel to the Chateau Laurier. God, I miss those days. Union Station was wonderful.

lagatta

That was a particularly stupid urban planning decision. I suppose back then it seemed "green" because of the parkway. I don't think I've ever seen a railway station as dead centre as that one.

Bacchus

Union station in Toronto is dead centre too. Lets hope it doesnt share a similar fate some day

bagkitty bagkitty's picture

I think the most common feeling about CP in Calgary is that, so long as they don't provide any passenger services it would probably be better if they were to pull out all the tracks in the city core.... make the equivalent of a "ring road" to the north or south of the city. As it is, the entire south side of downtown Calgary is subject to the whims of CP schedulers... who seem to have a special interest in running extra long freights through during peak movement hours... and with the number of level crossings in the area traffic and transit often come to a complete stand still. I think Nenshi could not just guarantee reelection, but probably sainthood if he would propose expropriating the CP line that runs through downtown. Would make a great place to run the LRT system... or a bike path.

6079_Smith_W

Winnipeg made the ignorant move of putting its new bus depot way out at the airport. Try and make sense out of that one. Fortunately the last of their passenger train terminals is still in use downtown.

The thing is, given the frequency of VIA Trains there's no reason why they couldn't run them through downtown in most cities. If they had any interest in being  a user-friendly venture, that is.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Question: where's the bus terminal in Ottawa for Gray Coach, Greyhound, etc... is it still just a couple of blocks west of Bank Street downtown as it was in the 1960s?

 

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