IKEA comes to Winnipeg. The first thing to do is...

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Manitoba Girl
IKEA comes to Winnipeg. The first thing to do is...

Widen Kenaston!

 

City studying ways to widen Kenaston

CITY hall is already studying ways to widen the most gridlocked parts of Kenaston Boulevard, a plan in the works before IKEA announced it is coming to town.

The city has quietly commissioned an 18-month-study to look at where the road ought to be widened, how much it might cost and where the work should start.

The "functional plan," which is being done by the MMM Group, looks at a long stretch of the major artery from Ness Avenue near Polo Park to Taylor Avenue. The next step is detailed design and construction plans.

But the study doesn't include the small strip south of Taylor that Premier Gary Doer and Mayor Sam Katz pledged to widen Tuesday at a cost of $18.5 million. A functional plan has already been done on that section, and the right-of-way is already owned by the government. Adding two more lanes there is much simpler than buying up homes or expropriating land along the rest of Kenaston.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/city_studying_ways_to_widen_kenaston.html

But on the same day, city hall passed the capital budget plan that cut funds for bike paths!

City council passed the 2009 capital budget this afternoon but it did so to the disappointment of community activists who had earlier pleaded with councillors and Mayor Sam Katz to increase funding for bike paths and pedestrian walkways.

Council voted 11- 4 to approve the $476.1-million public works plan.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/breakingnews/Council_passes_capital_budget.html

Outrageous.

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture

The first thing to do after they open is expand your landfill sites, to accommodate all the pressboard crap that they sell that's going to fall apart after a year of use.

genstrike

I swear, this city has some of the stupidest city planning

Sven Sven's picture

Lard Tunderin' Jeezus wrote:
The first thing to do after they open is expand your landfill sites, to accommodate all the pressboard crap that they sell that's going to fall apart after a year of use.

A friend of mine just retired and sold out his furniture store business.  He said that people don't want quality furniture anymore.  They want cheap stuff that looks okay...until they want to toss it and get something new.  IKEA fits the bill perfectly.

Personally, I like good-quality furniture that will last for years...preferably decades.  I really appreciate hand-crafted work.

_________________________________________________

Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

It doesn't matter. Fifteen years from now it will be an empty shell.

Sven Sven's picture

Frustrated Mess wrote:

It doesn't matter. Fifteen years from now it will be an empty shell.

 

 

With "it" being...what?  Earth? 

 

______________________________________________________

Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

The Ikea. Earth will be what it is now. A stinking, rotting, landfill.

ecopinko

A coordinated campaign of domestic terror and sabotage.

 

Oh, you mean the first thing the city will do when ikea comes here.

genstrike

ecopinko wrote:

A coordinated campaign of domestic terror and sabotage.

 

Oh, you mean the first thing the city will do when ikea comes here.

Isn't Sam Katz already doing that?

Le T Le T's picture

"Earth will be what it is now. A stinking, rotting, landfill."

You should show some respect to the Earth. She is the only reason any of us live another second. When humans become too much for her to take she'll shake her back and we'll all be gone.

 

I forget who said it but I always liked the quote (which I will paraphrase as):

"Widening roads to deal with congestion is like loosening your belt to deal with obesity."

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

No Ikea crap here. People recycle old furniture - I stripped down and varnished two beautiful old oak bedroom bureaus that had heavy white (and leaded) paint originally - stuff that would cost a fortune if new. However, folks have been ordering a lot of pressboard crap from WalMart and Home Hardware in recent years, simply because the high quality stuff is out of reach for most. Old furniture handed down through families is highly sought after, but it's in limited supply.

genstrike

This just shows that perhaps Nick Ternette is right.  Winnipeg isn't a city (or at least, it won't be if we keep going this way).  It's a collection of suburbs with highways going to major retail outlets

Aristotleded24

genstrike wrote:

This just shows that perhaps Nick Ternette is right.  Winnipeg isn't a city (or at least, it won't be if we keep going this way).  It's a collection of suburbs with highways going to major retail outlets

That's not a bad assessment. The current Metropolitan arrangement came from the amalgamation of several different cities. (I believe this happened in the '70s under Schreyer.) The core, what used to be just the City of Winnipeg pre-amalgamation, is struggling. I wonder if the City would be better served under a similar arrangement that Toronto used to be under its metropolitan government. What I mean is that Winnipeg is broken up into different cities (Winnipeg, St. Boniface, Kildonan, St. James, Transcona etc) which elect their own councils, and they deal with their own local issues such as parks and recreation. There would then be a Metropolitan government that handled major city services, like transit and protective services.

Michelle

Interesting...I guess it's a bad thing that almost all the furniture in my apartment is from IKEA... :(  The only things in my whole place that aren't is my dresser (got it second-hand from someone about 10 years ago), my son's captain's bed and mattress, the mattress and box spring on my own bed (given to me 10 years ago as well), and one couch in my living room (which came with my apartment).

Why is IKEA worse than any other furniture store?  (I'm not asking that in a sarcastic manner - I am genuinely asking for information.)  I thought they were at least somewhat okay because they don't use old-growth forests for their furniture, they replace trees they use, etc. 

And I don't know about anyone else, but I am still using some IKEA furniture (a desk and hutch) that I got when I was 10 years old (that's 26 years ago for those counting at home).  Other pieces are hand-me-downs from my mother, who bought them 20 years ago when my parents separated.  So I haven't noticed that it's bad quality or falls apart.

IKEA is basically the only furniture I can afford to buy, short of going to sweatshop emporiums like Walmart and Zellers and getting stuff there.  And that stuff DOES fall apart quickly, whereas I find that IKEA stuff is decently engineered to fit well.  The only bad experience I've had with IKEA is a children's bed I bought there once for my son.

Unionist

Aristotleded24 wrote:

The current Metropolitan arrangement came from the amalgamation of several different cities. (I believe this happened in the '70s under Schreyer.)

Right, sort of. They were historically all separate municipalities (e.g. West Kildonan had its own mayor, council, etc.). In 1960, the chamber of commerce pitched a "metropolitan" concept, borrowed from some U.S. cities, and the "Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg" (I think) was created that year. It didn't eliminate the separate "townships", but teamed them together to provide transit and some other services. Sort of like the old Communauté Urbaine de Montréal, prior to the screwups of amalgamation and de-amalgamation of this decade.

"Metro" survived till 1971, when it was wound up and replaced by a single municipality, colloquially known as "Unicity". That spelled the final end of all the mayors, town halls, etc.

Should Winnipeg go back? I've been away far too long to judge. But if Nick Ternette and other activists are saying so, I'll lean with them.

Hey, while drifting here, I just heard that Nick is retiring and there's a gala for him this month! Any news about that?

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Damn. That's a gala I'd like to be at. But I'm a little too far away now. I will make some inquiries and see what I can see.

 

 

Aristotleded24

Unionist wrote:
Should Winnipeg go back? I've been away far too long to judge. But if Nick Ternette and other activists are saying so, I'll lean with them.

I brought up that idea from my own thinking. I don't know if it has come up in other activist circles.

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture

Michelle wrote:

Why is IKEA worse than any other furniture store?  (I'm not asking that in a sarcastic manner - I am genuinely asking for information.)  I thought they were at least somewhat okay because they don't use old-growth forests for their furniture, they replace trees they use, etc. 

The worst of the Ikea products I've experienced were made of particle board. They disintegrated upon moving them - a coffee table losing its legs from regular use within a year, a wardrobe unable to be used after one move.

Their 'solid wood' products fared somewhat better, but both shelves and a bed died what I consider premature deaths. It seems to me that Swedish pine is considerably softer than its Canadian counterpart. 

I still have one piece of Ikea furniture in the house, nearly 20 years old. I believe it is Malaysian in origin - so it is made of rainforest woods and by third world labour; no different from any Walmart or Pier 1 imported product in terms of environmental impact.

And what of the environmental impact of Ikea products, shipped to their Big Box warehouses from factories on the other side of the world?

I imagine the Swedish workers are better paid than their Chinese counterparts, but in terms of the environment I can see little difference. 

Unionist

Here ya go, N.Beltov:

NICK’S BIRTHDAY/
RETIREMENT BASH!
 

As a result of continuing
health problems after battling - and winning against cancer twice since
2005, Nick is finally going to publically....... 

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS?

RETIRE!!!!!

Your browser may not support display of this image.  
After 50 years of activism
and

40 years of public life,
our Nick is finally taking a much needed rest. 

Come and celebrate his

birthday and his many
life achievements! 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 2009

WESTMINISTER BOOKSTORE
AND CAFÉ

898 WESTMINISTER AVE.

7:00 - 10:00 PM 

MC: Lawrie Cherniack 

Guest Performer: Singer/Songwriter
Sara Kreindler
 

Sara’s performance
ranges from smoky jazz to quirky comedy, from haunting ballads to outrageous
satire.
 

RSVP: by e-mail as
there is limited seating -
ternette@mts.net. or by phone - 775-9327.

 

BleedingHeart

It depends what you pay for.  Cheap IKEA furniture is usually of poor quality and will end up in the landfill.  On the other hand, I still have a lot of IKEA furniture I bought when I was less wealthy that has survived several moves.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

genstrike wrote:

This just shows that perhaps Nick Ternette is right.  Winnipeg isn't a city (or at least, it won't be if we keep going this way).  It's a collection of suburbs with highways going to major retail outlets



That pretty much sums all modern urban development and what has been described as the Geography of Nowhere.


Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

Quote:
I do however with the same passionate fervour totally reject any
progressive activist that would link Israel to White Supremacists. It
wins us no friends and makes a laughing stock of real anti-racism. As
much as I deplore O'hara's characterization of Israel's position I do
agree with her that using the comparisions to white supremacy  is
pretty contemptible.

Municipalities have developed this destructive self-image of themselves that if they were teenagers we would send them to therapists. They believe they exist not for those who reside and pay taxes within them, but for foreign investors somewhere remote detached. Thus they sacrifice local, home grown businesses for the sprawl of big box retailers. As well, they fail to fully understand the value of land. Once land has been sold and developed for roads or so-called regional retail nodes, the land is gone no matter what other productive purpose it served whether agriculture, wet land, forest, habitat, whatever (all things we end up having to pay for. For example, a wet land provides the same service for free as does a $100 million storm water treatment plant).

In the next 20 years, people in cities all over the world will regret not having more undeveloped green spaces and agricultural land close to where they live. They will not regret having missed another consumer opportunity at  another Big Box store. 

Doug

Ikea has a decent cafeteria. I suppose that can be said for it.

Aristotleded24

Michelle wrote:
Why is IKEA worse than any other furniture store?
 

I have no issues with IKEA per se. The main issue here is that this particular store will be part of a new big-box development on the fringe an already sprawling city. As genstrike pointed out, planning in Winnipeg is atrotiously poorly done, and this new development will only make it worse.

The other issue is one of self-esteem. Many people in Winnipeg seem to think we are now "on the map" because the foreign-owned IKEA decided to set up shop. It's almost as if people want outsiders to noitce Winnipeg and what a "great" place it is instead of building our own community here.  No different than judging your own self-worth by whether or not the "cool" kids in school notice you.

Sky Captain Sky Captain's picture

Frustrated Mess wrote:
The Ikea. Earth will be what it is now. A stinking, rotting, landfill.


 

Since when? Most Ikea's are still around, and in actuallity, their stuff is functional, enviromentally friendly, easy to put together, and timeless (or at least won't go out of fashion.)  And it's not frakking Wal-Mart, at least.

Fidel

I like Maria Vinka's rocking chair made from banana tree leaves. Waste not want not.

And they apparently teamed up with a housing developer to build affordable housing in England. Brown's Labour put $15 billion on social housing, and some of them look pretty good as far as I can tell.

Yibpl

Manitoba Girl wrote:
...

But on the same day, city hall passed the capital budget plan that cut funds for bike paths!

City council passed the 2009 capital budget this afternoon but it did so to the disappointment of community activists who had earlier pleaded with councillors and Mayor Sam Katz to increase funding for bike paths and pedestrian walkways.

...

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/breakingnews/Council_passes_capital_budget.html Outrageous.

Winnipeg is the only place where I have been hit by a car while bicycling.  (It happened twice and I lived there 3 years).  Don't get me wrong, I love Ikea; $1 breakfasts, a good cafeteria, UTZ certified coffee, wooden toys, stylish solid furniture, etc.  But a city as beautiful and cultural as Winnipeg should be a cycling mecca.

 

jacki-mo

I bought some furniture at IKEA in Halifax many years ago, when they first opened. It was solid pine. I recently went to an IKEA and noticed particle board and really flimsy designs. It ain't what it used to be. Better to attend auctions and get some solid furniture (if you are patient ).

pragmaticidealist

Sven wrote:

Lard Tunderin' Jeezus wrote:
The first thing to do after they open is expand your landfill sites, to accommodate all the pressboard crap that they sell that's going to fall apart after a year of use.

A friend of mine just retired and sold out his furniture store business.  He said that people don't want quality furniture anymore.  They want cheap stuff that looks okay...until they want to toss it and get something new.  IKEA fits the bill perfectly.

Personally, I like good-quality furniture that will last for years...preferably decades.  I really appreciate hand-crafted work.

_________________________________________________

Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!

 

That's all fine and dandy and I tend to agree with you.  However, the low-income single parents etc. who want to provide a reasonable standard of living for themselves and their kids aren't necessarily able to afford that luxury.  I'm not trying to run to the defense of IKEA, but you have to at least understand that people face very different circumstances and thus are forced to make different choices.

Snert Snert's picture

As nice as handcrafted furniture is, I'm not as fussy about having a handcrafted desk lamp, handcrafted dish drainer, handcrafted cutlery, and so on.

jas

I have a serrated-edge kitchen knife from Ikea which is my main kitchen knife (not being picky about kitchen utensils) that I use for everything from chopping vegetables to cutting meat and even cutting hard candle wax. I've had it for at least 20 years, and it's been the favourite of many I've shared an abode with. I don't think I've ever sharpened it! I don't have a knife sharpener.

Just sayin' :)

Snert Snert's picture

I have two awesome cast iron dutch ovens from IKEA.  Both of them, together, were about a third of the price of similar pieces from Le Creuset.  Also, most of my pots and pans are from IKEA, and they've given me years of great service.

Why the hate on for IKEA?  They're not Walmart.

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

I don't hate IKEA, but I'm depressed every time I'm in one of their "stores" (circuses? Purchasing Festival Arenas? Consumerist gulags?). I'm not sure exactly what it is: the crowds, the imperative to consume, the shitty meatballs everyone lines up for anyway... It's just...discomfiting, a weariness of spirit.

I have an IKEA couch (my first ever new piece of furniture) and a few other IKEA objects that I don't hate, but I think I prefer used furniture whenever posible (fleas and bedbugs make used couches and mattresses a problem). I dislike that everyone's apartment seems to look the same nowadays, and that all IKEA furniture should come with an expiry date. Also: if you move, your IKEA dresser ain't coming with you.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

It depends on which dresser.

I looked for reasonably priced dressers that did not need a ton of work done to make them usable and not hideous for the wild girls for nearly two years before picking up a pair at the Ikea in Edmonton (trip there was for another reason).  They aren't particle board.  They're also not top quality, but median range for kids' furniture is fine.  The girls will either take them with them when they leave home or they will be donated so someone else gets some wear out of them. 

I prefer to buy used furniture - I have re-upholstered a couch and chair, bought an old, used china cabinet that needed some TLC, same with my dining room table, etc, etc.  Sadly, you can't always find just the thing you need that way - and garage sales are labour intensive.  Also, some of them should be called "garbage sales".

Ikea also has some really good kitchen wares and toys - including art supplies.  I like Ikea just fine.

al-Qa'bong

My kid's rooms are furnished with a mix of IKEA and old stuff from my grandparents.  We have a few other IKEA items, including IGGY, my shower curtain.

I've never tried the food.

We go to IKEA whenever we're in Edmonchuck; it's exactly like the one in Nantes, which is the first, and only other one, we've been to.  I suspect that Mme. Qa'bong associates IKEA with home.

The tram ride out there is interesting.  One of the stops is "Chantenay," as in the carrot variety.  On one trip a Gypsy was training her four-year old daughter to panhandle (or whatever they call it) from passengers.

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture
DaveW

al-Qa'bong wrote:

We go to IKEA whenever we're in Edmonchuck; it's exactly like the one in Nantes, which is the first, and only other one, we've been to.  .....

The one in Nantes is just off Salvador Allende boulevard .... I doubt the one in Edmonton is.

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

Ikea workers in the US have just won union certification.  This is one very nasty company.  It is interesting that America is now becoming a destination for sweat shop employers because of its lack of employment standards. Ikea markets itself as a corporation that raises labor standards all along its supply chain through its corporate ethics policy.

Quote:

Union organizing won back the weekend for Tawanda Tarpley and her co-workers at an Ikea-owned furniture plant in Danville, Virginia.

Mandatory overtime at the Swedish-owned plant meant that last year she worked for three months without a single day off. The union raised such a stink about the mandatory overtime that curious Swedish journalists turned up in Virginia.

After scathing articles about conditions in the Swedwood plant appeared overseas, union woodworkers in Europe and Asia pressured the iconic Swedish brand.

Even Jon Stewart’s satirical “Daily Show” made an appearance, picking up a line from Machinists union organizer Bill Street, who painted the situation in Danville as an example of the U.S. turning into “Europe’s Mexico.”

Management backed down, and the Machinists (IAM) won 221-69 with a 91 percent turnout in a July 27 vote.

“We were fed up with wages, safety concerns, overall communication. We want to be treated with respect,” Tarpley said, adding that once, an angry supervisor threw a board at a co-worker.

IAM says Danville’s plant is the most dangerous furniture factory in the U.S., with 1,536 days lost from work due to injury since 2007.

OSHA fined the plant $13,500 for lying about its accident rates and hiding eight serious injuries.

Last year the company dropped pay all over the Swedwood plant. In the shipping department, starting pay went from $9.75 to $8 an hour.

Until the union drive goaded managers into making changes, nearly a third of the workforce was hired through a temporary agency. That changed, Tarpley said, “by us making it an issue—we wanted to have the front office hire some of them.”

They were successful in getting most of the temps hired permanently. Some had worked in the plant for years.

The working conditions in Danville are quite a contrast with Ikea’s unionized factories in Sweden, where starting workers make $19 hour and receive five weeks’ paid vacation.

POINT SYSTEM

 

The Ikea workers loathe their humiliating discipline system. If a worker accumulates nine points, he or she is fired.

Going to the restroom without permission costs a point. When Tarpley’s son was hit by a car, she had to leave early to go to the emergency room. She earned a half point. There’s no appealing it, she said.

A man collapsed from heat exhaustion during the recent heat wave (workers said the factory reaches 102 degrees inside). He was carried out on a stretcher—and assessed a point.

“It’s the most strict place I have ever worked," 63-year-old Janis Wilborne told the Los Angeles Times. Like many workers in Danville, she left the job in disgust.

The mandatory overtime drove many away. "I need money as bad as anybody, but I also need a life," Kylette Duncan told the paper. She left for a lower-paying retail job.

Workers say there is no formal training in the plant. They are taught by other workers who may have been there only a few weeks, who in turn were taught by untrained co-workers. “Nobody really knows what they’re doing,” said Tarpley.

Workers also complain of favoritism. Managers will hire family members and then quickly promote them over long-time workers, she said.

Black workers charged they get worse shifts and are passed over for promotions. Six claims are pending against the company for racial discrimination.


http://labornotes.org/2011/08/furniture-workers-win-ikea-union-drive-hel...

 

Aristotleded24

Northern Shoveler wrote:
Ikea workers in the US have just won union certification.  This is one very nasty company.  It is interesting that America is now becoming a destination for sweat shop employers because of its lack of employment standards.

It's also good news because Virginia is a right-to-work state.

Bacchus

I fucking hate right to work states. That causes such hardship that I actually applaud my Republican Father in Laws employment standards when he had his own store

Sven Sven's picture

If people don't like IKEA (for whatever reason), I suggest that the first thing they do is: Don't shop there.

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

No the first thing to do is change the laws so that there are actual employment standards and workers rights.  Its hard for me to engage in boycotts because I buy less than most people and always look for local businesses that treat their employees well.  Ikea is not somewhere I would normally shop so my continuing to not shop there is meaningless in trying to ensure this company does not exploit its workers.

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Michelle wrote:
Why is IKEA worse than any other furniture store?
 

I have no issues with IKEA per se. The main issue here is that this particular store will be part of a new big-box development on the fringe an already sprawling city. As genstrike pointed out, planning in Winnipeg is atrotiously poorly done, and this new development will only make it worse.

The other issue is one of self-esteem. Many people in Winnipeg seem to think we are now "on the map" because the foreign-owned IKEA decided to set up shop. It's almost as if people want outsiders to noitce Winnipeg and what a "great" place it is instead of building our own community here.  No different than judging your own self-worth by whether or not the "cool" kids in school notice you.

My major issue with IKEA and the corporate consumer culture that supports it is the way it is totally divorced from the local economy and ecology.

In a more sensible world, one might imagine pine furniture in Winnipeg not shipped in from 6600 kilometres away. The fact that this goes unnoted astounds me.

voice of the damned

DaveW wrote:

al-Qa'bong wrote:

We go to IKEA whenever we're in Edmonchuck; it's exactly like the one in Nantes, which is the first, and only other one, we've been to.  .....

The one in Nantes is just off Salvador Allende boulevard .... I doubt the one in Edmonton is.

The closest thing Edmonton has to an Allende Boulevard is [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmer_Ernest_Roper]Roper Road[/url]. Not sure where that is in relation to the Ikea.

 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Ikea founder Ingvar Kamprad's Nazi ties 'went deeper'

BBC wrote:
Author Elisabeth Asbrink says Mr Kamprad was an active recruiter for a Swedish Nazi group, and stayed close to sympathisers well after World War II.

The details go beyond what Mr Kamprad has previously admitted.

 

lagatta

Yes, Mr Kamprad had more in common with Henry Ford than being a successful entrepreneur with a "system". But I don't think a boycott would be the best way to make amends for that shameful past - they should commit to funding anti-racist initiatives.

I went to the Montréal IKEA for the first time this week - I had bought their MELDAL daybed (black-painted steel, not fibreboard). http://www.ikea.com/fr/fr/catalog/products/10073977 It seems very solid. Secondhand, from someone I know (but still very new). However the mattress wasn't thick enough, since the Meldal has a metal frame in front too and it hits one's legs while sitting on it or getting out of bed with just their original mattress (which is otherwise very comfy). They had a sale on their foam mattresses this week, and they were much cheaper than anything of similar quality at a furniture or mattress store (I checked several). The mattresses come in a roll so the smaller ones can be carried on public transport or at least in a taxi. I have no car and very, very few of my friends have cars any more (we have an excellent carshare service here, CommunAuto, and several have subscriptions) so that is an important factor.

Yes, of course I arrived when the cafeteria was open before the store. The $1 breakfast was fine and the coffee was simply excellent for cafeteria coffee.They also have very clean washrooms and facilities for the parents of small children.

Of course it is obvious that IKEAs are scrupulously designed by experts in the psychology of shopping, starting out with cute tiny things for children. I did manage to buy just one thing other than the mattress, a packet of Swedish almond/ginger cookies that cost half what the same article by a different brand costs at Jean-Talon Market. Those are a nice thing to have if someone should drop by for tea or coffee, and at $1.29, I don't feel like too much a consumerist sucker.

It was raining heavily and a long walk to the nearest bus stop, which would also involve taking my slippery mattress roll down and up the stairs of an underpass of the service roads of le boulevard Métropolitain (Highway 40) so I took a taxi home, which cost me an extra $20 (I had planned for this).

IKEAs everywhere are on the outskirts of cities, and it is not really safe to cycle to the Mtl one from where I live, although Ville St-Laurent is not terribly far and I've often cycled to other parts of it. I know people in the Netherlands and Denmark who take their purchases from there home with their bicycles, but they have cargo bikes as well as normal ones. Here the need for a car runs counter to their purported green business model.

Moreover, I certainly agree that people in Manitoba should be able to buy pine furniture made from wood from their own province or at least somewhere on the Prairies - but IKEA is certainly not the only villain in that absurdity.

They have been anti-union here in Québec too, but unfortunately they are not alone in that. I see no reason they couldn't grant their workers here the same benefits and rights as their workers in Sweden - they are very profitable.