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Student strike - lockout and repression #8

Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

Waiting for the legislation to be tabled this evening - May 17, 2012.


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Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

Charest has a one seat majority. Any chance of someone on the gov't side not showing up to vote?  Or - worse case scenario - will  Marois vote with the gov't?


Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

CAQ will vote with the government. Not possible that PQ would.

 


cco
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Joined: Apr 25 2005
Also, his 63 seats would be a majority of one if the National Assembly were full, but there are three vacancies. The opposition can't muster more than 59.

Bärlüer
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Joined: Aug 20 2007

I will be at tonight's demo in just a few minutes to un-welcome the lock-out legislation the zombies in the National Assembly will congratulate themselves on passing.

In the meantime, here's a terrific video inspired by the popular demo "slogan" (exclamation?) "Cha-rest... Woo-hoo"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMAm16YkDjQ

Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

Bärlüer wrote:

I will be at tonight's demo in just a few minutes to un-welcome the lock-out legislation the zombies in the National Assembly will congratulate themselves on passing.

Wish I could be there - take care and solidarity!

Quote:
In the meantime, here's a terrific video inspired by the popular demo "slogan" (exclamation?) "Cha-rest... Woo-hoo"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMAm16YkDjQ

Haha, brilliant - "even my mother says that you're exaggerating" - "I want you to be my Papa" - they'll drive him out with ridicule!

 


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Une majorité des Québécois pour le gel ou la baisse

(Québec) Selon un sondage Harris-Decima, une majorité des Québécois serait en faveur du gel ou de la baisse des frais de scolarité. Mais les Québécois seraient tout de même plus favorables à une hausse que les Canadiens des autres provinces, qui paient déjà davantage....

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/dossiers/conflit-etudiant/201205/17/01...

google translate:

A majority of Quebecers to freeze or lower

(Quebec) According to a Harris-Decima survey, a majority of Quebecers would support the freeze or lower tuition. But Quebecers would still be more favorable to higher than Canadians in other provinces, who are already paying more.

The telephone survey was conducted from May 10 to 14 with 1,014 Canadians. For the whole country, the margin of error is + / - 3.1% 19 times out of 20. The margin of error increases for Quebec. It is + / - 6.2%, due to the small sample of 248 respondents.

The survey was commissioned by the Canadian Federation of Students.

The question asked was: "Do you think it would have tuition fees of colleges and universities in your province be reduced, frozen at current levels or increased?"

In Quebec, 40% of respondents favored an increase. This is the highest proportion in the country. They were also 40% for the gel, and 15% for lower charges.

Across the country, only 16% of respondents wanted an increase in fees. They were 45% for the gel, and 33% for lower charges.


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009

Manifestation familiale | Contre la hausse des frais de scolarité

https://www.facebook.com/events/233059570140740/

google translate:

Family event | Counter rising tuition

     Sunday, June 3, 2012
     2:00 pm in UTC-04

We invite the entire population of Quebec to take to the streets of Montreal Sunday, June 3 at 14h.

Let us not impress no special laws!

June 3, demonstrating for the right to education!


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Nathan "Si j'étais Jean Charest"

video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=W8yN0wCgpbw

google translate:

Nathan, 10 years, offers advice to Jean Charest on the student strike.

Follow us on Facebook (The World According to Nathan) and Twitter (@ nathan depending)!

Thank you to Pierre Foglia, who introduced us to Nathan in his column of April 12, 2012: http://www.lapresse.ca/debats/chroniques/pierre-foglia/201204/11/01-4514466-d ...

And a big thank you to Nathan and his family.

This video was shot May 12, 2012, in the 13th week of the student strike against rising tuition fees, before the resignation of Beauchamp and the announcement of a special law.


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009

Ultime appel des carrés rouges, verts et blancs pour reprendre le dialogue

Les représentants étudiants Martine Desjardins et Léo Bureau-Blouin ont lancé un « ultime » appel à la négociation avec le gouvernement, à quelques heures du dépôt du projet de loi spéciale. Ils étaient appuyés dans leur démarche par des élus, ainsi que par des représentants des carrés verts, pour la hausse, et des carrés blancs, qui réclament une trêve....

google translate:

Ultimate appeal red squares, green and white to resume dialogue

Student representatives Martine Desjardins Bureau-Blouin and Leo made ​​a "final" call for negotiations with the government, a few hours of the filing of special legislation. They were supported in their efforts by elected representatives as well as green squares, for hiking, and white squares that are calling a truce.

"We want to directly challenge Mr. Charest and the cabinet, saying that a negotiated solution is still possible," said Leo Bureau-Blouin, president of the Quebec Federation of College Students (FECQ). "Special Act, no special law, this does not preclude having a crisis that is honorable, negotiated a crisis," he added.

The President also called for FECQ ignore the feelings of "revenge" and "aggressiveness" of both sides.

Martine Desjardins, president of the Federation of University Students (FEUQ), asked the Prime Minister - who is also minister responsible for youth - to waive the special law and thereby demonstrate that he was "a head of state and not just the leader of a party. "....


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Jean Charest n'a pas l'intention de rencontrer les leaders étudiants

(Québec) Le premier ministre Jean Charest n'a manifesté aucune intention de rencontrer les leaders étudiants qui se sont déplacés à l'Assemblée nationale, jeudi, alors que la loi spéciale sera déposée sous peu.....

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/dossiers/conflit-etudiant/201205/17/01...

google translate:

Jean Charest has no plans to meet with student leaders

Quebec) Premier Jean Charest has shown no intention to meet with student leaders who traveled to the National Assembly on Thursday as the special act will be filed shortly.

He spent much of question period to suffer the wrath of the opposition. "What a waste, what a terrible mess!" Thundered the Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois. "We are discussing a special law against our children, against our youth, all because of the stubbornness of the Prime Minister because he must save the face of Prime Minister." She said Mr. Charest was "locked into a logic of siege", showing "contempt" and "is dead set against the young."....


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
..here's another take on the above poll.
Un nouveau sondage indique que la majorité des Canadiennes et Canadiens croient que les frais de scolarité devraient être réduits ou gelés

http://www.newswire.ca/fr/story/976833/un-nouveau-sondage-indique-que-la-majorite-des-canadiennes-et-canadiens-croient-que-les-frais-de-scolarite-devraient-etre-reduits-ou-geles

google translate:

A new poll indicates that most Canadians believe that tuition fees should be reduced or frozen

OTTAWA, May 17, 2012 / PRNewswire / - Nearly 80% of Canadians believe that tuition fees should be reduced or frozen, according to a new poll by Harris-Decima for the Canadian Federation of Students.

"The cost of a postsecondary education is out of control," says Roxanne Dubois, National President of the Canadian Federation of Students. "This poll indicates that Canadians believe in a system of education affordable and accessible to all. "

The survey revealed that, even in Quebec, where government attempts to increase tuition by 75% in five and led a student strike fierce, almost 60% of respondents believe they should not increase tuition.

"The Quebec government should recognize the negative consequences that would have increased fees for accessible education system that has been built in recent decades in this province," says Roxanne Dubois. "The government should cancel the increase in tuition and abandon his plan to impose a" special law "that would undermine democracy on campus. "

The survey was conducted from May 10 to 14, 2012 by teleVox, Harris-Decima. National survey results are considered accurate to within 3.1%, 19 times out of 20.

The Canadian Federation of Students is the largest student organization in Canada, bringing together over half a million members in all ten provinces. The Federation and its predecessors represent the student population in Canada since 1927.


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Students smooch during the student protest in Montreal, Thursday, May 17, 2012. Students smooch during the student protest in Montreal, Thursday, May 17, 2012.

epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009

Anna Kruzynski Concordia Prof Arrested: L’État est violent, pas nous!

http://www.lapointelibertaire.org/node/1924

google translate:

The state is violent, not us!

I'm against tuition fee increases.
I am for protecting the common good.
I am against all operating systems.
I'm all for direct democracy.

I was among the thousands who attended the demonstration against the law this special night.
After some time, the event is declared illegal. Lines of riot on foot and by bicycle charged the crowd on all sides, on all sides. "It moves! It moves! ". The crowd can not be dispersed. Tensions arise. The fear also. This is the dispersion.

I was preparing to go home, I débarrais my bike when I was surrounded by twenty officers riot with my spouse and five others who were unknown to me.
Suddenly the McGill College was invaded by 20 police cars, a bus full of riot helmets and more officers on foot, staff in hand.
My heart is pounding. I feel faint. My mouth is dry. My throat tightened. I'm afraid.
An hour later I put under arrest for unlawful assembly. I searched members apart, like a movie.
I'm crammed into a cage of a van without air steel with another woman, also arrested. I start to sweat. I feel dizzy. I feel claustrophobic. I ask that we open the door for air. I do not know.

I feel the fear rise when I see the van that takes the highway to the east. I understand that brings us to the neighborhood police station on 48 Langelier.
A person at a time is escorted by one of two buses packed. My girlfriend gets mad cage. The handcuffs are too tight. She can not feel his hands. We ask for help. We are told to keep quiet.

The panic rises. Why are we locked up like animals?

All those arrested are identified and released. I can not stand. The police take a break. They eat. They smoke.
I have more air. I want. I cry. We cry together. We are told to stop us excited.

After 2 hours of waiting it's my turn. I was photographed. I get a ticket under the law whose description is: "participating or being present at a meeting, procession or gathering endangering peace, security or order on public ".

I arrive home at 5:30. I'm exhausted. I am outraged.

Apparently, in the Democratic Quebec Jean Charest, my ideas and justify acts of intimidation and violence.

I can not be complicit in a state that represses my dissent. That thousands of students and students on strike. That of workers.
I'm afraid. But the cause is just. I am not to be intimidated by their violence. The fight continues.

Anna Kruzynski
On May 17, 2012


Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

*


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
Une loi spéciale dérogatoire à l’esprit de la Charte des droits et libertés de la personne ?
40. Toute personne a droit, dans la mesure et suivant les normes prévues par la loi, à l’instruction publique gratuite.

http://www.vigile.net/Une-loi-speciale-derogatoire-a-l

google translate:
A special act derogatory to the spirit of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Like many Quebecers, I listened to the speech of our Prime Minister on the conflict with the students. There is unfortunately nothing new in the special bill proposed by the government.

Jean Charest did not intend to move or on tuition or on university management. Instead he decreed a break by suspending classes until August, thereby pulling the rug out from under students.

In fact, the bill will end the effects of the student strike. All who will go to their classes in schools that have agreed with their students to a resumption of classes before August can not be prevented from doing so by striking students.

According to Jean Charest, the right to education is a fundamental right that allows all students to access their classrooms but could not be prevented from doing so, while, in fact, the Charter of Rights and freedoms rather recognizes the right to free public education.

     40. Everyone has the right, to the extent and the standards provided by law, to free public education.....

Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

You can find the text of the law here.

I seriously doubt that there has been any legislation which approaches the fascistic nature of this bill in recent history. Its aim is not just to crush the strike - it is to crush the student associations. It targets not just the freedom of peaceful assembly - it actually attacks freedom of association. It's far worse than any predictions I personally had seen in the media.

And the repression of demonstrations, unless I'm reading it wrong, isn't restricted to students. For example, under section 16, anyone who organizes a demonstration of 10 or more people in a place "accessible to the public" must notify the police 8 hours in advance of the time, place, duration, itinerary, and means of transport. The police can then require a change of place or itinerary. Violations of any part of this by an individual (whether through action or omission) attracts a fine of $1000 to $5000 for a day or part of a day that the violation takes place. If it's a leader of a student union, or the organizations itself, the fines can go much higher - up to $125,000, and that's double for recidivism.

There are also clauses allowing the educational institution, if it thinks a student association has violated something or other, to deprive it of all usual privileges (collection of dues, offices, etc.). The length of time is one semester for every day of violation. There's a reverse onus in several of these clauses.

I really can't continue. This is the face of fascism.

 


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009

..they have made social peace imposible

 


Sven
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Joined: Jul 22 2005

Unionist wrote:

You can find the text of the law here.

I seriously doubt that there has been any legislation which approaches the fascistic nature of this bill in recent history. Its aim is not just to crush the strike - it is to crush the student associations. It targets not just the freedom of peaceful assembly - it actually attacks freedom of association. It's far worse than any predictions I personally had seen in the media.

And the repression of demonstrations, unless I'm reading it wrong, isn't restricted to students. For example, under section 16, anyone who organizes a demonstration of 10 or more people in a place "accessible to the public" must notify the police 8 hours in advance of the time, place, duration, itinerary, and means of transport. The police can then require a change of place or itinerary. Violations of any part of this by an individual (whether through action or omission) attracts a fine of $1000 to $5000 for a day or part of a day that the violation takes place. If it's a leader of a student union, or the organizations itself, the fines can go much higher - up to $125,000, and that's double for recidivism.

There are also clauses allowing the educational institution, if it thinks a student association has violated something or other, to deprive it of all usual privileges (collection of dues, offices, etc.). The length of time is one semester for every day of violation. There's a reverse onus in several of these clauses.

I really can't continue. This is the face of fascism.

 

That really is a stunning piece of legislation. Wow. 


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

yes it has all turned out rather badly it would appear. Here's the English CBC on it with lots of awful comments as well...

 

Quebec Education Law to Impose Fines in Tuition Crisis (and vid)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2012/05/17/quebec-student-p...


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009
..here is the headline from the wall street journal. to read any more of the article you need to subscribe.
Class Warfare Is Weighing on Quebec

MONTREAL—Quebec's government is trying to restore calm as sometimes-violent student demonstrations stretch into their fourth month—disrupting daily commutes and drawing a rare travel advisory from the U.S. consulate.

Students, protesting planned tuition increases by the government of the French-speaking Canadian province, have been staging night marches and boisterous demonstrations since February, but protests have turned more violent. Dozens of students and police have been injured in near-daily melees in and around Montreal, in several cases as striking students try to bar students who want to finish their studies from classrooms.

Late Wednesday, police arrested 122 after students rampaged through downtown ...

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142405270230344840457741001257666938...


Catchfire
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Joined: Apr 16 2003

Stunning. Up to a $250 000 fine for a student association launching an impromptu demonstration. What arrogance by Charest.

Can those in Quebec gauge whether this obscene bill will have traction with the public? Some reports I've read seem (rightly) aghast at it, and speculate that it will backfire.

Where is Canada's party of the left?


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

Catchfire wrote:

Where is Canada's party of the left?

Good question. It will be interesting to see if "the French Defamer" believes in equal opportunity when it comes to wading into provincial affairs, and passing judgment on premiers.

 


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

But I loved it when he called Brad Wall "Harper's Messenger". That was priceless!!! The ultimate putdown. I think Mulcair has some Pierre Trudeau in him. Laughing


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

*smirk*

Better go back to the other thread, Boom Boom.


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

Mulcair livens up QP in a way we haven't seen since PET - that can't be denied. Smile

 

ETA: Like everyone else, I'm waiting to hear what Mulcair has to say about this draconian legislation that tramples on rights.


Sven
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Joined: Jul 22 2005

epaulo13 wrote:

Late Wednesday, police arrested 122 after students rampaged through downtown ...

WSJ wrote:

Late Wednesday, police arrested 122 after students rampaged through downtown streets, smashing bank windows, police said. The rioting followed an all-day emergency cabinet meeting of the Quebec government.

After the meeting, officials proposed legislation that would suspend classes until August to allow for a cooling-off period. The provincial parliament was slated to meet Thursday evening to debate other measures to better protect students who wanted to continue their studies.

Meanwhile, four protesters have been charged with "inciting fear of terrorism" after allegedly detonating smoke bombs this month inside Montreal's subway system. After a last-ditch effort at negotiations this week, the province's education minister, who also served as deputy premier, stepped down.

Increasingly, some protesters have described their fight as not just over tuition increases, but also against what they say is a corrupt capitalist system—a shift that has frustrated the government as it tries to negotiate the tuition-fees dispute.

At a protest march on Tuesday, Matthieu Deutté used a loudspeaker to address a group of around 200 students.

"What began here three months ago as a student strike has gone on to be a protest against a whole system," said Mr. Deutté, a 25-year-old student of administration.

That has officials and businesses here worried that the violence could drag on, deterring visitors at the start of Montreal's summer tourism season. Last month, the U.S. consulate in Montreal issued a travel advisory for Americans in Canada—rare for Canadian cities—warning them to stay away from protests.

At Boutique Legends, a souvenir shop in historic Old Town, manager Amita Verma said protests have at times left the area "dead," adding, "That's worrisome."

Sympathy among other Montreal residents for the students has waned as the protests have dragged on.

Marie-Josée Le Blanc supported the protesters early on. But on April 20, hundreds of them poured into the mall where she works, smashing windows. For days, security guards restricted access to the mall, forcing clients of her optician shop to cancel appointments. Ms. Le Blanc said her student daughter also now wants to get back to classes.

"It's gone on too long," Ms. Le Blanc said.

The provincial government, and many Quebecers and Canadians outside the province, point out that even with the planned tuition increases, students there pay far lower fees than almost anywhere else in North America.

Over the next seven years, the Liberal government has proposed raising fees by 75%, to around 3,800 Canadian dollars (US$3,765) in a bid to trim a C$3.3 billion deficit. The average student in Canada pays C$5,366. Last year, U.S. students paid average tuition of $8,244 at a state public college, according to the College Board, a not-for-profit organization.

Still, student leaders say the increases are an affront to Quebec's long-enshrined efforts to make higher education accessible to all. In the 1960s, the so-called Quiet Revolution brought sweeping change to the previously conservative Catholic society and created a system aimed at boosting access to higher education.

"Schools should be free," said mechanical-engineering student Julien Lavigne. But some critics say the protest chants are more the cry of the privileged than the oppressed. Mr. Lavigne, who recently returned from teaching snowboarding in Japan, still attends a part-time mechanical-engineering course that remains unaffected by the strikes.

"I am not doing this fight for myself," but for others who can't afford education, he said.

The protests have split students into three groups. Those wearing red squares of cloth—denoting support for the strike—have mostly stayed away from classes and participated in the rallies. Those sporting green squares want to get back to school. More-neutral students wear white.

Many "greens" have gone to court to win injunctions, forcing classes to reopen. But in recent skirmishes at several campuses, hordes of students wearing red squares have organized to block access to building entrances, or disrupt classes.

Sporting a green patch early Tuesday morning, Genevieve Maheu arrived at College de Rosemont in the hope of entering an institution whose doors had been forced open by an injunction. Blocking her and several other greens were around 70 red-square-wearing students.

After police cleared away protesters with batons and pepper spray, the college called off classes, citing safety concerns.

"All I want to do is get into my class and finish the course I paid for," said Ms. Maheu, a 25-year-old medical student.


cco
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Joined: Apr 25 2005
Amir Khadir is tearing into the Liberals on the mafia issue, despite the Speaker slapping him down for it. I'm prouder than ever to be with QS.

Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

People are saying that the next time a minister has a fundraising breakfast with crime bosses, she'll have to keep it to fewer than ten , if she doesn't want to notify the police.

Yeah, Khadir is good. But there are very few staunch defenders of just plain democracy around today. 

 


Bärlüer
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Joined: Aug 20 2007

Catchfire wrote:

Stunning. Up to a $250 000 fine for a student association launching an impromptu demonstration. What arrogance by Charest.

Can those in Quebec gauge whether this obscene bill will have traction with the public? Some reports I've read seem (rightly) aghast at it, and speculate that it will backfire.

I think the government has overplayed its hand. Even some "carrés verts" people in my Facebook feed (ugh) have expressed their profound discomfort with the legislation.

The resistance has already begun.

The Quebec bar has put out a press release criticizing the bill.

Charest: Décrisse! Scramme!


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

I don't see how the bill can stand. It so clearly attacks Charter rights to assembly, association, freedom of speech -  some unions or lawyers need to go to court and take it down asap.


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