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Water for Flint, not for Nestlé

Bottled water. Image: Flickr

Flint is still dealing with the lead poisoning of residents' drinking water. Residents of Detroit are once again experiencing water shutoffs. Ontario has the highest number of Drinking Water Advisories in First Nations out of all the provinces in Canada. All the while Nestlé is allowed to pump millions of litres of water from Ontario and Michigan every day to bottle and sell for profit. 

I went to Detroit this past weekend to meet with the Water Is Life coalition to talk about these and other water justice issues around the Great Lakes. Nearly 20 organizations gathered over two days to develop strategies to prevent the privatization and commodification of water, ensure affordable access to drinking water and sanitation, uphold Indigenous rights to water, protect the Great Lakes and implement the UN-recognized human rights to water and sanitation. 

The groups included the Council of Canadians including the Guelph chapter, Detroit People's Water Board, Flint Democracy Defense League, Flint Rising, Chiefs of Ontario, Michigan Citizens for Water Conservation, Michigan Welfare Rights Organization, Story of Stuff, Wellington Water Watchers, Corporate Accountability International, Great Lakes Commons and more. The coalition has continued meeting since the Water Is Life: Strengthening A Great Lakes Commons summit in Flint last fall to coordinate work and develop collective strategies to advance the human right to water around the Great Lakes Basin. 

Nestlé's bottled water operations in the Great Lakes Basin

In Ontario, Nestlé continues to pump up to 4.7 million litres (1.2 million gallons) of water every day on expired permits from its two wells in Wellington County, Ontario. Nestle has purchased a third well in Elora and could be given the green light to pump once Ontario's moratorium on new and expanded bottled water permits ends in January 2019. The City of Guelph has raised concerns about the impacts of Nestle's water takings on the municipality's future drinking water. 

Progressive Conservative leader Doug Ford becoming Ontario's new premier raises serious concerns about the protection of water from Nestlé and other bottled water companies.

Council of Canadians' Political Director Brent Patterson has noted, "Ontario PC leader Doug Ford does not appear to have issued a policy statement on the issue of bottled-water takings, but the Toronto Star has previously reported that clients of the Ford family firm, Deco Labels & Tags, includes Nestlé Canada Inc., Coca-Cola, Cara Operations and Porter Airlines." 

Wellington Water Watchers and the Council of Canadians have been calling for a phase out of bottled water takings in Ontario. Recent surveys by both organizations have shown that the majority of people in Ontario want bottled water takings to be phased out and for water to be protected for communities. 

Michigan Citizens for Water Conservation and the Grand Traverse Band (GTB) of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) both recently filed legal challenges against the Michigan government for giving Nestlé the green light to increase its pumping from 250 gallons (946 litres) to 400 gallons (1514 litres) of water every minute. (Make a donation to MCWC to help with their legal defense fund to fight Nestlé.) GTB have consistently raised concerns that Nestle's permit approvals fail to consider the GTB's treaty rights.

Drinking water advisories in First Nations

Six Nations of the Grand River, downstream from Nestlé's water takings in Ontario, and the Chiefs of Ontario have stated that First Nations have not given consent to Nestlé's permits in Ontario.

CBC recently reported that only 9 per cent of residents of Six Nations have clean water

In May, there were a total of 174 drinking water advisories (DWAs) in First Nations across Canada, with 91 DWAs in Ontario alone. Some of these First Nations have been under DWAs for 5, 10 and some even nearly 20 years and rely on bottled water as a band-aid solution. The Mohawks of Tyendinaga on Lake Ontario have had DWAs since 2003 and 2008. Despite Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's promises to end DWAs, the total number of DWAs has remained largely the same. 

Different levels of government are responsible for different areas on water. The provincial government issues Permits to Take Water to companies like Nestle while the federal government is responsible for water on First Nations reserves. But both levels of government have continued to approve projects without free, prior and informed consent as required by the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and governments must coordinate to espect treaty rights and implement the human right to water.

Detroit water shutoffs is a violation of the human right to water

In Detroit, the fifth round of water shutoffs began this spring. 17,000 homes were earmarked for their water to be shut off this year. Roughly 80 per cent of Detroit residents are black. Poverty rates are also at roughly 35 per cent. Water rates have risen in Detroit by 119 per cent in the last decade and many residents are unable to pay the high water bills. 

UN experts have made clear: "Disconnection of water services because of failure to pay due to lack of means constitutes a violation of the human right to water and other international human rights."

On June 9, Council of Canadians Guelph chapter members Lin Grist and Ron East, myself and other groups joined the Solidarity Saturday's rally outside the Detroit Water Department to protest the water shutoffs. Participants at the rally connected the dots between water justice issues like Nestlé's water takings, Flint's water crisis, Indigenous water rights and the Detroit water shutoffs. Residents and supporters chanted "Water for Flint, not for Nestlé" and "Water is a human right!" 

The Detroit Water Department now shares an office with the Great Lakes Water Authority. Food and Water Watch and other groups raised concerns about the potential for privatization with the the regional water authority early on.

Flint's water crisis is not over

The lead poisoning of the water in Flint over the last four years has led to urgent water and public health crises. The lead poisoning has resulted in an increase in fetal deaths and miscarriages, development impacts on children and a host of serious medical conditions. Last fall at the Water Is Life Summit in Flint, Bishop Bernadel Jefferson talked about the corrosion of her grandson's and how he'd gone from being an A student to becoming a D-E-F student. Her grandson is one of the thousands of children affected by the lead poisoning of Flint's drinking water. 

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder ordered for the last water pods to be closed in April stating that they have restored water quality and the need for bottled water has ended.

But Flint Mayor Karen Weaver, state representatives and thousands of residents have highlighted a lack of trust and a lack of proof that the water is now safe.

Water is a human right

The corporate takeover of water by big water corporations like Nestle around the Great Lakes and the violations of the human right to water and Indigenous rights shows that access to water often falls along racial, class and other lines.

Economic globalization and unregulated market capitalism have divided the world – and the Great Lakes Basin – into rich and poor as at no time in living history and endangered the ability of the planet to sustain life. Tragically, most governments support an economic system that puts unlimited growth above the vital needs of people and the planet. 

I am heartened and energized by groups and communities around the Great Lakes as we continue to build a world that protects the human right to water and protects water for people and the planet. 

Emma Lui is a Water Campaigner for the Council of Canadians. 

This article originally appeared on the Council of Canadians blog

Image: Flickr

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