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Activist Communique: Strong hearts, Native lands

The Deets:

Wednesday November 13, 2012

7:00pm in UTC-06

Where: Rm 2B22, Oral History Centre, University of Winnipeg (515 Portage Avenue)

Cost: FREE

The Call Out:

A Roundtable On Grassy Narrows First Nation Featuring Judy Da Silva, Susanne McCrea & Thor Aikenhead.

Where: Rm 2B22, Oral History Centre, University of Winnipeg (515 Portage Avenue)
Cost: FREE
 
In December 2002 members of the Grassy Narrows First Nation blocked a logging road to impede the movement of timber industry trucks and equipment within their traditional territory. The Grassy Narrows blockade went on to become the longest-standing protest of its type in Canadian history.

The University of Manitoba Press would like to invite you to an event marking the 10th anniversary of the blockade and celebrating the Canadian edition of Anna Willow’s Strong Hearts, Native Lands: Anti-Clearcutting Activism at Grassy Narrows First Nation.

This roundtable will feature presentations by Judy Da Silva of GNFN (and other speakers to-be-confirmed), which will be followed by a Q&A.

* * *

Judy Da Silva is a resident of Grassy Narrows First Nation and a member of the Grassy Narrows Women's Drum Group.

About Strong Hearts, Native Lands

In December 2002 members of the Grassy Narrows First Nation blocked a logging road to impede the movement of timber industry trucks and equipment within their traditional territory. The Grassy Narrows blockade went on to become the longest-standing protest of its type in Canadian history. The story of the blockade is a story of convergences. It takes place where cultural, political, and environmental dimensions of Indigenous activism intersect; where history combines with current challenges and future aspirations to inspire direct action.

In Strong Hearts, Native Lands, Anna J. Willow demonstrates that Indigenous people’s decisions to take environmentally protective action cannot be understood apart from political or cultural concerns. By recounting how and why one Anishinaabe community was able to take a stand against the industrial logging that threatens their land-based subsistence and way of life, Willow offers a more complex “and more constructive” understanding of human-environment relationships.

Grassy Narrows activists have long been part of a network composed of supporters that extends across North America and beyond. This book shows how the blockade realized those connections, making this community’s efforts a model and inspiration for other Indigenous groups, environmentalists, and social justice advocates.

 

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