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Weekly Pulse: South Dakota's legislative attack on abortion providers

| February 17, 2011

The South Dakota House of Representatives will soon vote on a bill that would expand the definition of justifiable homicide to include killing to protect the life of a fetus. The plain language of the bill would appear to legalize the murder of abortion providers for performing legal abortions on women who request them.

Kate Sheppard explains in Mother Jones:

The bill, sponsored by state Rep. Phil Jensen, a committed foe of abortion rights, alters the state's legal definition of justifiable homicide by adding language stating that a homicide is permissible if committed by a person "while resisting an attempt to harm" that person's unborn child or the unborn child of that person's spouse, partner, parent, or child. If the bill passes, it could in theory allow a woman’s father, mother, son, daughter, or husband to kill anyone who tried to provide that woman an abortion -- even if she wanted one.

"The bill in South Dakota is an invitation to murder abortion providers," Vicki Saporta, the president of the National Abortion Foundation told Mother Jones.

The bill's sponsor, Rep. Phil Jensen, vehemently denies that his bill would legalize the murder of abortion doctors, Sheppard reports in a follow-up post. Jensen did not return Mother Jones's calls for comment before the original story ran, but he now claims that he simply wants to update the state's fetal homicide legislation.

Jensen's stated intent is irrelevant, however. The plain language of his bill expands the category of "justifiable homicide" to protect certain people who kill to save a fetus.

There is no question that many radical anti-choicers will interpret this legislation as a licence to kill. If this bill becomes law, it is only a matter of time before one of these terrorists travels to South Dakota to test that interpretation.

As Jodi Jacobson of RH Reality Check notes, the bill codifies the same legal argument that anti-choice terrorist Scott Roeder deployed unsuccessfully at his trial for the assassination of the prominent late-term abortion provider and pro-choice activist Dr. George Tiller. Technically, the bill would only protect people who killed to "protect" a fetus being carried by their partner or family member, not strangers like Roeder who killed to "protect" fetuses in general, but the veiled threat to abortion providers is clear.

The bill cleared the legislature's judiciary committee by a party-line vote of 9-3. The legislation is co-sponsored by 22 state legislators and 4 state senators. The full state house is scheduled to vote on the bill on Wednesday.

Steve Benen of the Washington Monthly sees the legislation as a sign of a "radical turn" in the culture war.

"Birth or die Act" advances

Meanwhile, at the federal level, the anti-choice bill H.R. 358 passed the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Miriam Perez reports for Feministing. H.R. 358 is controversial on two fronts. First, it appears to create an opening for hospitals to refuse abortion care and abortion referrals, even when a woman's life is at risk. Second, the bill would effectively end private insurance coverage for abortion as we know it.

Fruitwashing

You've heard of "greenwashing," the marketing trend where companies repackage their old polluting inventory as planet-healthy products? The latest corporate marketing gambit is to convince consumers that sugar, starch, and red food dye are good for us, a process dubbed "fruitwashing," by Brie Cadman of change.org.

Cadman takes food giant Kellogg's to task for touting the "real fruit" in its frosted mini Pop Tarts, now available in 100-calorie packs. Of course, these rosy toaster pastries contain only a minuscule amount of fruit.

Kellogg's is a repeat offender when it comes to fruitwashing. The box of the company's Frosted Mini Wheats Blueberry Muffin cereal features photos of real blueberries, but the actual "blueberry crunchlets" in the box are made of sugar, soybean oil, red dye #40 and blue dye #2.

Play with your food

In an article called Why Playing With Your Food is Serious Business, Carol Deppe of Grist argues that processed fare is driving us to overeat by cheating us out of our instinctive drive to interact with our foods before we eat them:

I also tend to overeat the delicious bean soup on that day I effortlessly thawed a portion from the freezer, compared with the day that I made the soup from scratch myself. The act of preparing food seems to actually be one of my satiety mechanisms. That is, to avoid overeating, to feel satisfied with normal, healthful amounts of food, I have to play with my food.

A highly processed diet enables us to practically inhale our calories, leaving us unsatisfied.

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