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1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later

On June 28, 1914 The Archduke Franz Ferdinand of the Austro-Hungarian Empire was assassinated by a young Serbian and vaulted Europe into a war from which it would never recover. This blog attempts to counter the mainstream inclination to cast The Great War as grounds for heroism, patriotism and military bravado -- rather than four years of violence, trauma and irretrievable loss.

Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later April 24
The Armenian Genocide Memorial Tsitsernakaberd
Mel Watkins | Genocide haunts the 20th century. And 100 years ago, the century's first began in fearsome earnest.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later April 16
Mel Watkins | Even amidst all the carnage and murder in the First World War, every so often, in small ways, ordinary human decency broke through -- and lingers on in the collective memory.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later February 24
Mel Watkins | Karl Polanyi, one of the great intellectuals of the 20th century, argued that the First World War was a nationalist response to the enormous tensions generated by the industrial revolution.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later February 2
Mel Watkins | Stefan Zweig, born in 1881 in Vienna, in its heyday as capital of the Habsburg Empire, became one of the best known and most translated writers of his time, read throughout Europe.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later November 17
Mel Watkins | To argue that the First World War was "inevitable," a pre-determined result of some conjuncture of historical forces, is wrong from the very moment of the improbable event that triggered it all.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later October 24
Mel Watkins | What can the author of 'Capital in the Twenty-First Century' tell us about the First World War and wealth inequality?
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later September 29
Mel Watkins | The most prolific sniper of the First World War was Francis "Peggy" Pegahmagabow, an Ojibwa from the Wasauksing First Nation. His name is often forgotten in histories of the period.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later September 16
Image: Wikimedia Commons
Mel Watkins | The famous Canadian historian was deeply touched by the First World War and it affected his career and philosophy for the rest of his life.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later September 4
Jamie Swift | Apologists for wars usually claim that they've been fought for high-minded reasons. To suggest that the carnage of the First World War was about imperialism and influence does not sound very noble.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later August 26
James Keir Hardie, socialist and founder of the British Labour party
Mel Watkins | Marx and Engels famously wrote: "Workers of the world unite. You have nothing to lose but your chains." They should have added: "And if you don't pull together, a lot of you will die in bloody wars."
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later August 7
Mel Watkins | The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand may have lit the spark, but the explosion of communications and national presses may have really caused the Great War.
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later July 17
Mel Watkins | The First World War was certainly a great catastrophe with great suffering. But did it really deserve its pre-Second World War moniker?
Blog - 1914: The Great War, 100 Years Later July 7
Mel Watkins | Watching World Cup soccer on TV and reading about the First World War on the occasion of its centenary, keeps this ancient blogger on his learning curve.