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Nima Maleki is a policy analyst and consultant. His writings focus on international relations and the impact of philosophy on politics and art. Nima is also studying communication, philosophy and politics at the European Graduate School.

Israel threatens China, Iran barred from the SCO and Israeli document calls Gaza blockade 'economic warfare'

| June 10, 2010

Israeli officials have said they threatened war against Iran in order to try and convince China to vote in support of economic sanctions at the UN Security Council.

The New York Times broke this story: "In February, a high-level Israeli delegation traveled to Beijing to present alleged evidence of Iran’s atomic ambitions. Then they unveiled the ostensible purpose of their visit: to explain in sobering detail the economic impact to China from an Israeli strike on Iran."

One Israeli official they interviewed said that "the Chinese didn’t seem too surprised by the evidence we showed them, but they really sat up in their chairs when we described what a pre-emptive attack would do to the region and on oil supplies they have come to depend on."

Essentially Israeli officials boast that they tried to threaten China by showing how they could undermine its energy security and damage its economy.

China imports some 15% of its oil from Iran and is reported to have more than US$80 billion invested in that country's energy sector.

Iranian president Mahmud Ahmadinejad will be traveling to China this week, this very day in fact, officially to take part in the Expo 2010 in Shanghai. It is expected that he will meet with Chinese officials to discuss the newly minted sanctions against it.

Meanwhile, no surprises for the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) meeting , it is will not be giving Iran permanent membership just yet.

The SCO, which has become one of Asia's most prestigious multilateral organizations, has Russia, China, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan as members. Iran, Pakistan, India and Mongolia are observers, and it will have Afghanistan as an honoured guest this time around.

Iran, Pakistan, and India have been interested in becoming full members. There is jostling for whether Pakistan or India, or both could become full members. But Iran is essentially barred for now. The SCO is to adopt a new document outlining admission rules. The secretary general of the SCO, Muratbek Imanaliyev, has said that "the document contains a very important thesis that states under UN sanctions cannot become SCO members yet." So, there, Iran can only watch for now.

Apparently Tajikistan lobbied in Iran's favour, asking that the restriction based on UN sanctions not be included. Interestingly, president Ahmadinejad was just in Tajikistan, this very Wednesday. He was there for a UN-sponsored water security conference but was supposed to have met with the Tajik president to discuss regional security, and I suppose also push for support on SCO membership.

Meanwhile, back in Israel, there's more fallout from the commando attack on the Gaza flotilla that saw nine people die. An Israeli human rights organization, Gisha, has legally forced the government to explain its motives for a blockade of Gaza. Apparently the blockade is not for security reasons after all, though that is what is publicly stated to garner international support. The Israeli government document attained by Gisha says that the blockade is in fact economic warfare.

"A country has the right to decide that it chooses not to engage in economic relations or to give economic assistance to the other party to the conflict, or that it wishes to operate using 'economic warfare'." says the government document.

And in the U.S., some of the spoils of war from Iraq and Afghanistan will be on display. The Conflict Research Center will allow researchers to view archived digital copies of documents captured from Saddam Hussein's government as well as some that were captured from al Qaeda and its affiliates. The facility boasts that it has a database of "1.5 million captured records."

These records "consist of a wide range of files, including everything from al Qaeda “pocket litter” to financial records, theological and ideological documents, strategic plans, operational guidebooks, and histories of individual operations from the Afghan war in the 1980s through the early 2000s."

The original Iraqi documents are supposed to be returned to Iraq after digital copies are made.

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Comments

thanks for your reports.

a CBC article earlier said that UN Security Council sanctions included those that targetted finance.

on the one hand, limits to Iranian borrowing from privateers might not be a bad thing in the long run, on the other hand, if the sanctions are meant-and are successful-in forcing Iran to open its economy (further) to private US finance, that would not be good.

somewhere in recent reading it became clear that the US dollar's global rule is a fundamental problem.  particularly as the US dollar is completely controlled by private bankers.

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