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Canadians are demanding a bold new future for our public postal system

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Delivering Community Power has been helping Canadians who want to see a better future for our postal service get their voices heard. A nationwide letter-writing campaign has been flooding local and national papers with demands for an innovative, bold Canada Post that is the hub of the next Canadian economy. Postal banking, charging stations for electric cars, a farm-to-table food network and more.

Below, we've published only a few of the letters DCP has received. If you want to join the campaign you can sign the petition or write your own letter.

 

Bold new postal plan a "no-brainer"

Dear Editor,

As the Trudeau government conducts its public review of Canada Post, the answer to the question of whether to leap forward with a bold new plan or simply apply more service cuts to the existing model, seems a no-brainer to me. Among other ideas, the Delivering Community Power proposal calls for postal banking, services for seniors, and coast-to-coast charging stations for electric cars. Talk about exciting new employment opportunities! Canada Post is profitable, despite some claims to the contrary. To "green up" and expand services as the DCP proposal suggests, would not only provide environmental benefits, but also strengthen urban and rural communities -- many of whom have no bank branches.

Dozens of countries around the world have profitable and successful postal banking services. It would be foolish for Canada not to join their ranks. Perhaps we might even serve as inspiration for the United States.

A golden opportunity to reform Canada Post is within our grasp. Let's not waste it.

Tanya Coad, Nelson B.C.

 

After years of cuts, it's time to try something different

Dear Editor,

The government is currently conducting a public review of Canada Post.  This is the moment for people to speak up about what we want from our postal service.

We've had years of service cuts and increased prices.  It's time to try something different.

The post office can deliver more than mail.  The government should adopt the Delivering Community Power proposal, which calls for postal banking, services for seniors, and coast-to-coast charging stations for electric cars, among other ideas.

I strongly support adopting postal banking in Canada.  Canada's big banks took in $35 billion in profits last year -- while cutting jobs and raising service fees at the same time. I feel Canada Post could provide a much needed alternative to the Big Banks. Many communities across Canada have post offices, but no bank branches. A postal bank is an affordable, local solution that can also invest in the community.  Dozens of countries around the world, including New Zealand, France and Italy, have profitable and successful postal banking services. There's no reason why we can't too.

Canada Post is the country's largest retail and logistics network -- and as a Crown Corporation, all of us own it. Contrary to popular belief, our postal service is profitable, and has been for most of the past two decades. It's a great service that could become even better.

Mark Grieveson, Toronto ON

 

Canada Post can deliver government promises of renewable, sustainable future

Dear Editor,

Our federal government was elected on promises of leading us into the renewable future. We were proud when Canada led the COP 21 Paris climate talks to agree on a 1.5 C target. We are waiting to see how pipelines, dams, etc., will be handled.

Now comes an innovative opportunity to address the need for infrastructure and concrete action: through our postal service. This profitable, nationally owned organization can also be an affordable local bank that invests in its community. It can serve as an electric charging station, provide services for seniors, deliver food farm-to-table and more. A new proposal to use innovative postal services to help build the equitable sustainable economy we were promised is being reviewed by the government now.

Check out www.deliveringcommunitypower.ca for details. Our post office can deliver the sustainable infrastructure of the next economy!

Anne-Marie Reimer, Mitchell B.C.

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Image: Delivering Community Power

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