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Keep Karl on Parl

Are you a coach, athlete or sports fan? Then this week's edition of reconciliation resolution is for you.

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Christina Gray: Why I wore regalia to my call to the bar

Photo: Christina Gray

The last few days were a whirlwind. Never did I expect that I would be an ambassador for my culture, but I am quite humbled that I was able to share my culture with Canada when I was called to the bar at Roy Thompson Hall in Toronto on June 23, 2015.

It was proudest moment of my life. I got to sit amongst my peers, cross the stage and receive the right to practice law in Ontario. I am equally proud that I won the right to wear my Tsimshian button blanket and cedar bark hat, and from the Law Society of Upper Canada.

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Reflecting on reconciliation

Photo: Christina Gray
Christina Gray reflects on her time at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission final events and what it meants for her, her family and Canada.

Related rabble.ca story:

Time for reconcili(action)

Photo: Christina Gray

This past weekend and the first weekend in June concluded the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). This was the last of all of the TRC events in Canada. There have been seven national TRC events since 2010 and the eighth event was the closing in which the findings of the TRC commissioners were presented.

The week prior to the closing, I thought to myself: 'This is the last one, there's not going to be another one of these again.'

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Report finds Kinder Morgan proposal violates First Nation legal principles

Photo: Flickr/Brent Granby

On May 26, the Sacred Trust, acting on behalf of the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation, released an 89-page Independent Assessment Report, about the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline. The comprehensive report, which incorporated the findings of six expert reports, conclusively opposes the pipeline proposal.

The proposal includes two pipelines and an expansion of the Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby. Kinder Morgan seeks to transport 890,000 barrels a day, in the two proposed pipelines between Edmonton and Burnaby. The terminal expansion would include an increase of traffic from 60 to 408 tankers per year.

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Across Canada ceremonies remembered stolen sisters

Photo: Elizabeth Littejohn

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This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Women's Memorial Day March in Vancouver. This event exists to commemorate the lives of women who have gone missing or were murdered in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (DTES). In recent years the issue of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women has begun to gain more attention from the Canadian public, international community and authorities. Yet the problem persists.

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Timeline: Burnaby Mountain pipeline protests

Photo: flickr/Mark Klotz

Kinder Morgan's as-yet-unapproved Trans Mountain pipeline has hit the heart of Metro Vancouver residents, academics, and First Nations.

In the past week, over 60 protesters have been charged with civil disobedience pursuant to a court ordered injunction given by the B.C. Supreme Court. The protests on Burnaby Mountain did not come out of nowhere. Here is timeline of the NEB and legal decisions that have precipitated the current protests:

December 16, 2013:  Facilities application made for Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain Pipeline to the National Energy Board consisting of 1,150 km oil (193 km of existing pipeline and 987 km of new) pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby.

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Is the grass greener for Grassy Narrows?

Photo: flickr/Howl Arts Collective

On Friday July 11, the Supreme Court of Canada released a unanimous decision on Grassy Narrows First Nation v Ontario (Natural Resources). The decision, concerning First Nations treaty rights, was written by Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin. The Court held that only the Province of Ontario has the right to "take up" lands in the Keewatin area under Treaty 3 in Northwestern Ontario.

Taking up lands

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Looking to the future: Tsilhqot'in vs. British Columbia

Photo: Flickr/Colin J. McMechan

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For the first time in 147 years, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) made a declaration of Aboriginal title. The Xeni Gwet'in, one of six Tsilhqot'in Bands, were successful in bringing their claim for for a 1,750 square kilometre tract of land representing just 5 per cent of the traditional Tsilhqot'in territory. The highest court also confirmed that the issuance of provincial forestry licenses on this land unjustifiably infringed Aboriginal rights.

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