Jim Stanford

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Jim Stanford is an Economist with Unifor, the new union formed in 2013 from the merger of the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) and the Communication Energy and Paperworkers' (CEP). Unifor represents over 300,000 members in over 20 economic sectors. Jim received his PhD in Economics in 1995 from the New School for Social Research in New York, and also holds economics degrees from Cambridge University and the University of Calgary. He is the author of Economics for Everyone (published in 2008 by Pluto Press and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives), which has been translated into six languages. He writes an economics column for the Globe and Mail, and is a member of CBC TV's regular National News economics panel, "The Bottom Line." He lives in Toronto with his partner and two daughters. Jim's column appears in rabble courtesy of the Globe and Mail.

Harper's Canada: The worst economy in post-war history

There is no other time in Canada's post-war economic history in which Canada's economy has performed worse than it did under the Harper government.

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The worst: Canada's economy under the Harper government

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Speculation is intense that the unofficial election campaign we have already been experiencing for several months is about to become official: Ottawa is awash in rumours the writ may be dropped as early as this weekend, setting the stage for months of promises, accusations and photo-ops.

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Harper is fighting the deficit battle but losing the economic war

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To fight shock doctrine, progressives need to learn critical economics

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Judging the odds for an election recession

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

Canada's first-quarter GDP report was not just "atrocious," as predicted by Stephen Poloz. It was downright negative: total real GDP shrank at an annualized rate of 0.6 per cent (fastest pace of decline since the 2008-09 recession). Nominal GDP fell faster (annualized rate of 3 per cent), as deflation took hold across the broader production economy (led, of course, by energy prices).

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A sea change is coming to the politics of corporate tax rates

Photo: Cheryl DeWolfe/flickr

The biggest change in Canada's tax policy over the last generation was the steep reduction in corporate income taxes (CIT) engineered since 2000 at both the federal and provincial levels. Advocates of CIT cuts promised they would stimulate more business investment and thus generate trickle-down benefits for all Canadians. Free-market economists built theoretical models to show that lower corporate taxes would boost investment, productivity and even wages.

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Canada's auto strategy: Grovelling for crumbs in NAFTA's grim reality

Photo: BUICK REGAL/flickr

You could hear jaws dropping onto factory floors right across Ontario's auto belt last month. Export Development Canada (EDC) announced a $525-million loan to Volkswagen. The money was not to lure the company -- the world's largest automaker -- to Canada. To the contrary, we're helping finance Volkswagen's growth 4,000 kilometers away: with expanded factories in Mexico and Tennessee, and a new plant in Mexico (producing luxury Audis).

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The five biggest outrages from the Conservative budget

Among the many galling, short-sighted, and ultimately destructive components of this federal budget, here are five that stand out.

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| April 21, 2015
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Corporate rights protections: A primer on investor-state dispute settlement

Photo: Jakob Huber/ECI Stop TTIP!/flickr

In light of the latest NAFTA Chapter 11 decision to go against Canada, I was asked to put together some background notes for our Unifor leadership on this bizarre quasi-judicial kangaroo court system. Here they are, in case they are useful for anyone else getting up to speed on the whole investor-state dispute system.

Some very good and more detailed resources on the subject include:

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