Monia Mazigh

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Monia Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. Mazigh was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband, Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge for over a year. She campaigned tirelessly for his release. Mazigh holds a PhD in finance from McGill University. In 2008, she published a memoir, Hope and Despair, about her pursuit of justice, and recently, a novel about Muslim women, Mirrors and Mirages. You can follow her on Twitter @MoniaMazigh or on her blog www.moniamazigh.com
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Do Muslim women need saving?

"Do Muslim women need saving?" book jacket

Do Muslim women need saving? This is the question author Lila Abu-Lughod tries to answer in her book published by Harvard University Press in 2013.

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Once again the bodies of Muslim women are used to justify wars

Photo: Kamyar Adl/flickr

Lord Cromer, the British consul general of Egypt, who was the de facto ruler of that country between 1883 to 1907, wrote in his book, Modern Egypt:

"The position of women in Egypt, and Mohammedan countries generally, is ... a fatal obstacle to the attainment of that elevation of thought and character which should accompany the Western civilisation … The obvious remedy would appear to be to educate women."

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Harper's new anti-terror legislation triumphs over rationality

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr
What makes Stephen Harper think that we are in dire need of new legislation to fight terrorism? Maybe the increase in police power and surveillance in Bill C-51 is not intended for terrorists.

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When fear triumphs over rationality: Harper's new anti-terror legislation

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

In the Oxford English Dictionary the definition of the word "fear" reads as follows: "an unpleasant emotion caused by the threat of danger, pain or harm."

Stephen Harper must have learned this definition by heart. The way he uses fear on the Canadian population to pass his proposed new anti-terror legislation is working to perfection, as least so far.

In a speech he recently delivered in Richmond Hill, Ontario, the prime minister stirred the spoon of fear in the cauldron of politics with a misleading dose of confusion, the whole wrapped in irrational reasoning to give birth to the following explosive statement:

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The false debate between freedom of expression and religious extremism

Image: ActuaLitté/flickr

Reading news coverage about the recent attacks on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo left me with many unanswered and uncomfortable questions. A very complex French, European and international event was summarized with simplistic headlines such us: "How remarkable that a humour magazine has led the fight against fanaticism" or "Paris attack illustrates the power of mockery."

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Hiding torture from us

Image: Lance Page / t r u t h o u t; Adapted: takomabibelot, Poe Tatum

In my October rabble column, I spoke about the horrible treatment of Abu Wa'el Dhiab, one of the Guantanamo detainees who was abusively force-fed by his American guards to dissuade him from continuing his two-year-long hunger strike. In that article, I wrote that Abu Wa'el Dhiab was another example of the collateral damage of the War on Terror, and indeed he was, as U.S. officials proved recently.

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Ten years after the Arar Inquiry, what has changed?

Photo: Jamie McCaffrey/flickr

This column is adapted from a speech delivered by Monia Mazigh at the conference "Arar+10: National Security and Human Rights a Decade Later" on October 29, 2014.

Let me start with a quote from George Bernard Shaw. The Irish playwright once said:

"Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time."

The Arar+10 conference is important for three main reasons.

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The ongoing War on Terror: What's it really about?

Image: Jared Rodriguez / t r u t h o u t/flickr
The War on Terror is never-ending. But is it really about a war on ISIL or their barbaric methods or a recapture of what is left of the Middle East after two disastrous wars?

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From 2001 to today: The never-ending War on Terror

Image: Jared Rodriguez / t r u t h o u t/flickr

On October 6, 2014, a U.S. judge decided to make information public about the horrific force-feeding of Abu Wa'el Dhiab, a Guantanamo detainee.

The news didn't make the headlines on CNN or Fox news. The treatment was not denounced over and over by every big or small Muslim organization, as they have done when it comes to the treatment of minorities and journalists by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). In some media outlets, the news was portrayed as a victory for transparency and government accountability.

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A world of fear: Tracking 'terror' in Tunisia

Photo: Chasing Donguri/flickr

While I was visiting my family and friends in Tunisia this summer, I came across a new feeling, or maybe it is an impression -- a feeling or impression that I never encountered before in the country that is proud today to be called the sparkle of the "Arab Spring."  

I grew up there in the '80s. I remember seeing in people's eyes the fear of authority, humiliation, loss of dignity, the sorrow of poverty, suspicion, but I didn't see the "fear of terrorism." Even in the darkest hours of the country, during the '80s, when there were violent incidents attributed to Islamist militants, I didn't hear from people around me that they were afraid.

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