Monia Mazigh

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Monia Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. Mazigh was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband, Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge for over a year. She campaigned tirelessly for his release. Mazigh holds a PhD in finance from McGill University. In 2008, she published a memoir, Hope and Despair, about her pursuit of justice, and recently, a novel about Muslim women, Mirrors and Mirages. You can follow her on Twitter @MoniaMazigh or on her blog www.moniamazigh.com
Columnists

Are you on the terrorism blacklist? Maybe, but you can't do anything about it.

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Last week, a Vice News investigation revealed that a terrorism blacklist database, known as World-Check and founded in 1999, contains 2.7 million entries, many of them Muslim individuals and organizations.

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Will the Canadian government shed light on the no-fly list?

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It is a shame that a number of Canadian toddlers and young children are being humiliated at the airport in the name of extra security checks and delayed in boarding their plane with their parents. How as a society have we reached this level of complacency, accepting that such actions are "normal" under the pretext of living in security?

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Why is France emulating the U.S.?

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Everybody seems to speak French this week, love France and sympathize with the French. "Empathy" is now a French word. Even the British, long-time enemies of the French people, forgot about their jealousy, their rivalry in colonizing the world, their British superiority complex, and they did the undoable: on Monday The Guardian ran a long editorial en français!

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From Marois to Harper, niqab debate plays with xenophobic fire

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The election is coming to an end. All the way, I resisted the urge to write about the niqab. Why? I didn't want to create more controversy and stir the already ugly pot simmering in many people's minds. But then, it became stronger than me. My brain isn't as disciplined as my fingers so I found myself typing out thoughts about the niqab.

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History of migration has lessons for present-day refugee crisis

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Of course, my plan this week was to write a column about the meanings of the announcement made by the RCMP to lay criminal charges against George Salloum, one of the torturers of my husband, Maher Arar.

Beyond the symbolism of this unprecedented action taken by the RCMP -- to charge someone overseas who tortured and participated in the harming of a Canadian citizen -- there is always something deeply personal about this.

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Harper's recycled anti-terror rhetoric is getting tired

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Rendition: Canada, Sweden and Denmark share the same barbaric practice

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What factor is common to Canada, Sweden and Denmark? The snow, perhaps? The cold weather? The social programs? Or maybe smoked salmon?

How about rendition to torture? And how about cooperation with the intelligence authorities of countries which practice torture with total impunity? These may be some of the darkest common factors shared by the three countries, ones that not everyone is aware of.

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Wages of Rebellion: Calling for a peaceful revolution

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Chris Hedges' recent book is a passionate call for the "oppressed" of the Empire to revolt against the tyranny of surveillance, financial greed and propagandist journalism.

Oppression, tyranny, greed, propaganda -- these are words that seem to come straight from a communist manifesto or anarchist pamphlet. But Hedges is neither the former nor the latter. Actually, in some of his previous writing, he referred to himself as a socialist.

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The legal vengeance case of Omar Khadr

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A few years ago when some Canadian Muslim men, accused of terrorism, challenged the Canadian government through the courts to ask for their legal rights, voices within the intelligence community rose up and insinuated that these men were waging "judicial jihad."

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