Steve Anderson

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Steve Anderson is the founder and executive director of OpenMedia.ca. OpenMedia.ca is an award-winning Canadian nonprofit organization working to advance and support an open and innovative communications system in Canada. Steve is also an open Internet advocate, writer and social media consultant. His writing has appeared in numerous local and national publications such as The Tyee, the Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen, The National Post, rabble.ca, Epoch Times, Common Ground and Vue Weekly.
Columnists

How the Digital Privacy Act S-4 could bring copyright trolls to Canada

Canada's system of copyright enforcement is internationally recognized as a next-generation approach -- striking a balance between the rights of artists and creators and those of Internet users. Our system is designed to protect people from false claims of infringement and needless takedowns of legitimate online speech.

We have cause to be proud of this made-in-Canada solution that was won after a lengthy consultation and only came fully into force this past January. The system is known as "notice and notice" and obliges an Internet Service Provider (ISP) to deliver notices alleging copyright infringement to its customers.  

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Columnists

Hope springs municipal: How small towns are driving Canada's digital future

"If you want it done right, you have to do it yourself." Communities across Canada are doing just that when it comes to Internet access, through municipal broadband networks operated by local governments, public utilities, co-operatives, non-profits, or public-private partnerships. These towns are galvanizing Canada's otherwise lacklustre digital policy, as compared to the United States.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Columnists

What will it take to address Canada's privacy deficit?

Six months ago, we argued that Canadians face a stark privacy deficit.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
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Columnists

The CRTC, open access, and the future of high-speed Internet

Last December, telecom policy-makers at the CRTC began a year-long consultation on the future of Canada's Internet services. The Review of Wholesale Services consultation is examining how Canadians are served by the current structure of our telecommunications system, and the policies that govern it.

What's at stake is whether Canadians will be able to access affordable, independent, and reliable Internet services that support their everyday well-being.

Given the public interest mandate of the CRTC, it is important that these services enable everyday Internet users across the country to maximize their innovative and productive potential, and exercise their democratic rights in a free and open society.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
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Columnists

Global movement of Internet users create a crowdsourced agenda for free expression

Internet users around the world have come together to shape a new agenda for how we share and collaborate online. This week, OpenMedia is launching a study called Our Digital Future: A Crowdsourced Agenda for Free Expression that draws on input from over 300,000 people in 155 countries around the globe. Together with a broad network of civil society organizations and experts, these concerned citizens have weighed in on how we can create sensible copyright rules that support free expression in our digitally connected era.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
| September 5, 2014
| July 7, 2014
| April 10, 2014
| March 4, 2014
| March 4, 2014
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