Linda McQuaig

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Journalist and best-selling author Linda McQuaig has developed a reputation for challenging the establishment. As a reporter for The Globe and Mail, she won a National Newspaper Award in 1989 for a series of articles which sparked a public inquiry into the activities of Ontario political lobbyist Patti Starr, and eventually led to Starr's imprisonment. As a Senior Writer for Maclean's magazine, McQuaig (along with business writer Ian Austen) probed the early business dealings of Conrad Black, uncovering how Black used political connections to avoid prosecution. An irate Black suggested on CBC radio that McQuaig should be horsewhipped. In 1991, she was awarded an Atkinson Fellowship for Journalism in Public Policy to study the social welfare systems in Europe and North America. McQuaig has been a rare voice in the mainstream media challenging the prevailing economic and political dogma — as a columnist in the financial pages of the National Post in the late 1990s, and since 2002, as an op-ed columnist in the Toronto Star. She has also taken on the status quo in a series of controversial books — including seven national best-sellers — such as Shooting the Hippo (short-listed for the Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction), The Cult of Impotence and It's the Crude, Dude: War, Big Oil and the Fight for the Planet. Her most recent book is Holding the Bully's Coat: Canada and the U.S. Empire.
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Bernie Sanders' insurgent populism has shaken the Democratic Party and it's not going away

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Besides providing some powerful lines for Melania Trump's next speech, Michelle Obama reminded us this week how inspiring the Democrats can be at their best.

Indeed, while Donald Trump has grabbed political centre stage due to his sheer loutishness and the fierceness with which he's disemboweled the party of Abraham Lincoln, it may be the Democratic Party that is undergoing the more intriguing and far-reaching transformation.

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Let's not mix xenophobia with legitimate resistance to corporate trade deals

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The decision of British voters to leave Europe has been treated as evidence that they're intolerant xenophobes keen to seal themselves off from the world. That Donald Trump is on their side only helps make the case that they represent a boorish throwback, a desire to make the English-speaking world great again by turning it into a giant gated community surrounded by sky-high walls.

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Despite tough talk, Trudeau shies away from tackling Bay Street's chronic tax avoidance

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Brian Mulroney will surely be best remembered for the suitcase full of thousand dollar bills he received in a New York hotel room.

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In Canada's concentrated banking industry, what we need is a public bank

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For those with a yacht or a Porsche, banks are warm, welcoming places. But banks are considerably less hospitable to those needing financial services that don't include "wealth management."

Indeed, for hundreds of thousands of Canadians who have no wealth to manage and really aren't richer than they think, banks are increasingly inaccessible places.

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Rather than fearing the Leap Manifesto, let's bring on the debate

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That silly Leap Manifesto -- giving itself away right in the subtitle, which calls for "a Canada based on caring for the Earth and one another." No wonder it provoked fury and outrage.

As my colleague Thomas Walkom pointed out earlier this week, reports of the manifesto's scariness have been greatly exaggerated; its call for a transition from fossil fuels to green energy is solidly based in science and widely accepted.

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Treating voters as citizens -- and other lessons from my time in politics

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The most memorable moment of the 2015 federal election may be the release of a surveillance video capturing a candidate urinating into a stranger's coffee cup.

That episode comes to mind, oddly, as I think of what I learned during my recent two-year foray into electoral politics.

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Kevin O'Leary's extremism logical addition to Canada's Conservative Party

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Rather than some strange deviation, Kevin O'Leary seems like a logical addition to the recent pack of extremists leading Canada's political right.

What perhaps distinguishes O'Leary from Rob Ford, Stephen Harper and Tim Hudak is the sheer openness with which he advocates greed and making Canada safe for billionaires.

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Conrad Black to Bay Street: Justin can be trusted

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"Trudeau seems to be regaining enough of the old Liberal dexterity of being just far enough to the left of the Conservatives as not to seem like tweedle-dee and tweedle-dum to voters of the centre-left, and adequately to the right of the NDP not to frighten the cautious Canadian bourgeoisie." [italics added]

-- Conrad Black

National Post, October 2, 2015

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Harper's voter suppression plan: Coming soon to a polling station near you

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Stephen Harper's re-election strategy depends on a lot of you not voting. And if you mess with his plan by showing up at the polling station on Election Day, he's prepared for that, too: he's made it a lot harder for you to vote.

The prime minister has made it so much harder that "many tens of thousands" of Canadians may be denied their constitutional right to cast a ballot in the upcoming federal election, according to Harry Neufeld, former chief electoral officer for British Columbia.

In fact, the number of disenfranchised Canadians could actually be much higher, based on the evidence from a pilot project run by Canada's chief electoral officer, Marc Mayrand.

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