Murray Dobbin

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Murray Dobbin has been a journalist, broadcaster, author and social activist for 40 years. A past board member with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, he has written five studies for the centre including examinations of charter schools, and "Ten Tax Myths." Murray has been a columnist for the Financial Post and Winnipeg Free Press and contributes guest editorials to other Canadian dailies. He writes a regular "State of the Nation" column for the online journal The Tyee which is published simultaneously on rabble.ca. Murray has written five books, including critical profiles of Preston Manning, Kim Campbell and Paul Martin. His "The Myth of the Good Corporate Citizen" has been described as a citizens' guide to globalization. He has also prepared radio documentaries for the CBC Radio's Ideas series on subjects including taxes, human rights and the right-wing transformation of New Zealand. A long-time social activist Murray has been involved in many movements from the anti-nuclear movement, to the fight against so-called free trade and public-private partnerships. He is a Senior Advisor to the Rideau Institute on International Affairs and is on the board of Canadians for Tax fairness.

Preparing for the 2012 federal budget

Photo: Kitty Canuck
Finance Minister Jim Flaherty prepares to deliver one of the most draconian budgets in recent years.

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A progressive dialogue on the future: An open conclusion to the series

This week marks the end of our weekly series "Reinventing democracy, reclaiming the commons," a project begun last spring to help mark the 10th year of rabble. The series reflected the role of rabble as a site for activists -- a place for people who want to change the world to go, where their values are reflected back to them and where the world is not put through the perverse filter of the corporate media.

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Occupy, the New Politics Initiative and reclaiming the commons

My nearly 30 years of experience as a social activist in Saskatchewan immediately attracted me to the NPI 10 years ago: I had despaired for years over the deep and irrational divide between NDP party politics and the active social movements which characterized Saskatchewan political culture. The two should have been working together -- at least informally -- yet they existed as two solitudes. The NDP establishment detested social movements (and distrusted the labour movement) as naive and uncontrollable troublemakers because when the NDP was in power they persisted in criticizing the NDP government and making things uncomfortable for the ministers. Roy Romanow once told me he thought social movements were "totally useless."

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Social engineering: The Harper method

Photo: Kitty Canuck
Harper wants tax incentives for corporate charity giving to weaken social services.

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What Libya can expect from western democracy

The shifting sands of Libya are miring NATO. The Sahara in Libya by Matteo Caprari/Flickr
The shifting sands of Libya are miring NATO.

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Harper's majority: What's Left for us

There is no point dwelling on the obvious other than to simply reiterate it. The election of a Conservative majority government will usher in wrenching change in Canada and we will have to witness the worst that Stephen Harper has to offer. It remains to be seen whether or not Harper actually wants to stay around for another election to win it (and therefore not go too far in a first term), and solidify the dominance of his party as the new "natural governing party." Or whether, as his personality disorder would suggest, he will in a spirit of vengeance against the country he detests, dismantle as much of the post-war social contract he can in four years of virtually absolute power.

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The Liberal platform: NDP ideas and lots of smiling

Launching the Liberal Party platform, April 3, 2011. Photo: Michael Ignatieff/Flickr
Ignatieff: A platform full of left-of-centre policies, reflecting the values of fairness and equality and stealing Liberally.

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Canada would lose Conservative majority game

If you find it impossible contemplating what Canada will be like under a Harper majority government, here are a few suggestions of its horrific, extremist potential.  Photo: Sophie Harrington/Flickr
If you find it impossible contemplating what Canada will be like under a Harper majority government, here are a few suggestions of its horrific, extremist potential.

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