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What does #BlackLivesMatter mean for climate change? Everything.

Photo: niXerKG/flickr

The annual United Nations climate summit wrapped up in Lima, Peru, and on its penultimate day, something historic happened. No, not the empty promises from powerful governments to finally get serious about climate action -- starting in 2020 or 2030 or any time other than right now. The historic event was the decision of the climate-justice movement to symbolically join the increasingly global #BlackLivesMatter uprising, staging a "die-in" outside the convention centre much like the ones that have brought shopping malls and busy intersections to a standstill, from the U.S. to the U.K.

"For us it is either death or climate justice," said Gerry Arances, national coordinator for the Philippine Movement for Climate Justice.

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#FergusonSyllabus: Talking and Teaching About Police Violence

The blog Prison Culture has curated this amazing resource, #FergusonSyllabus, a post that brings together all the best teaching materials about the shooting of Mike Brown and the injustices that are faced by peaceful protesters in Ferguson. The post also includes resources to facilitate popular education around police violence and the prison industrial complex from Project NIA (No Youth in Prison), Buzzfeed, Chain Reaction and many more.

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Columnists

'White Skin, Black Masks': Rewriting Frantz Fanon's anti-colonial theory

Frantz Fanon. Image: mauldinart/Flickr

Last week, a friend of mine, Stefan Bird-Pollan, an Assistant Professor from the University of Kentucky, presented an insightful paper on Frantz Fanon at the University of Toronto's Jackman Humanities Institute. Fanon was one the 20th century's most influential anti-colonial theorists.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
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Disability, Racism, and Work in Canada: Black and Filipina women's experiences of exploitation and resistance

Wednesday, July 25, 2012 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm

Location

Vari Hall, Room 1156, York University Toronto, ON
Canada
Phone: 416-978-8201
43° 39' 11.6136" N, 79° 22' 59.4624" W

 

 

Transnational Narratives of Disability Speaker Series presents:

 

Disability, Racism, and Work in Canada: 

Black and Filipina women’s experiences of exploitation and resistance

 

Wednesday, July 25, 5-7 pm

Vari Hall, Room 1156

York University

 

Featuring

 

Joy Sioson, Chairperson, Philippine Women’s Centre of Ontario

Roberta Timothy, Postdoctoral Fellow, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

Rachel Gorman, Assistant Professor, York U. Critical Disability Studies

 

Please join us for a panel presentation and discussion of:

Anti-Black racism and disability

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