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Rosa Luxemburg: A revolutionary for our times

Photo: JeanneMenjoulet&Cie/flickr

On the second Sunday in January, activists and admirers visit the gravesite of Rosa Luxemburg in Berlin, a tradition begun after the Nazi era in the former East Germany.

Jailed for her opposition to the First World War, Luxemburg had been released after the signing of the armistice.

A Social Democratic (SPD) government had taken charge in postwar Germany, and it was busy quelling a Spartacus League workers' uprising in Berlin. Luxemburg (formerly with Spartacus League) supported the uprising after it took place, but did not favour it beforehand.

Rosa Luxemburg was by now a founder of the German Communist Party; she called for a postwar revolution to rid Germany of capitalist imperialism.

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Gary Burrill
| January 16, 2016
Migrant Matters

Michael Parenti: Profit Pathology and Other Indecencies

November 13, 2015
| Progressive author and scholar Michael Parenti discusses his most recent book, "Profit Pathology and Other Indecencies" and the ongoing global struggle against austerity.
Length: 33:32 minutes (76.78 MB)
Columnists

'Land is a Relationship': In conversation with Glen Coulthard on Indigenous nationhood

Photo courtesy of Glen Coulthard

"Your good words make my ears tingle," says Elaine Durocher as she overhears Glen Coulthard at a diner in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, unceded xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaʔ (Tsleil-Waututh) territories.

In December I had the opportunity to sit down with Coulthard, and in our discussion, he is describing how the granting of certain rights by the state works perfectly within colonialism by effectively masking the ongoing dispossession of Indigenous peoples. Durocher, a Metis grandmother and activist who I know within the Downtown Eastside community, joins our conversation and is nodding along.

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| September 17, 2014

The Debt Resisters' Operations Mannual

Debt, like many things in our capitalist system, is something that people generally believe is an individual problem. But in our current economic state, debt just another part integrated into a system designed to fail. It is a systemic issue that activists need to collectively resist and reject. The Debt Resisters' Operational Mannual was created by the writers, activists and academics at Strike Debt. It aims to give folks plain language tools to resist debt and offers up creative alternatives.

Find the Debt Resisters’ Operational Manual here!

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| December 3, 2013

Check your heads: Living theatre examines relationships to corporate culture

Photo: Tim Matheson

This autumn, The Theatre for Living (Headlines Theatre) presents Corporations in our Heads, an audience-led play that is completely absent of scripts or designated actors. Its main mission: to provide insight into the various relationships we have with corporate culture and control in our daily lives.

Though impossible to clearly articulate, as the content is improvisational and ranges night to night, Artistic and Managing Director David Diamond explains "theatre is a language that belongs to everyone."

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Capitalism needs to be disassembled, but first we need to know what it is

Photo: flickr/Nigel Hanlon
'Disassembly Required' is an excellent primer for anyone who knows they don't like capitalism, but don't know the history, how it works or how to critique it.

Related rabble.ca story:

'Disassembly Required' dismantles capitalism and builds new ideas about resistance

Disassembly Required: A Field Guide to Actually Existing Capitalism

by Geoff Mann
(AK Press,
2013;
$14.95)

Geoff Mann is the author of Disassembly Required: A Field Guide to Actually Existing Capitalism, which acts as a primer on economics 101 and speaks to those people who are not comfortable with the status quo, confused about the state of things and trying to imagine a different system.

Aaron Leonard recently corresponded with Professor Mann via email to examine the book and dig deeper into some of the popular explanations it offers. This is an edited version of their original conversation.

 

Who are you hoping to reach with this book?

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