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Harper and Merkel: Partners in austerity

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Chancellor Angela Merkel.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel visits Canada this week as champion of an austerity policy stance that is failing Europe.

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France and Greece celebrate electoral push back against austerity

Socialist Party supporters in Bastille Square cheered the end of the Sarkozy era in France. (Photo: democraticunderground.com)
France celebrated the defeat of Sarkozy over the weekend. Similar scenes took place in Greece, as the left rode a wave of anti-austerity sentiment.

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Ottawa protest serves notice: Austerity will meet resistance

In Ottawa yesterday, thousands protested Harper's austerity agenda. (Photo: Ariel Troster)
It's been a year since Harper got his majority. In Ottawa yesterday, thousands protested his austerity agenda.

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Preparing for the 2012 federal budget

Photo: Kitty Canuck
Finance Minister Jim Flaherty prepares to deliver one of the most draconian budgets in recent years.

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Images from anti-austerity rally in Toronto

Photo: Krystalline Kraus
Friday's rally in Toronto was organized as a pre-budget showdown in response to the Drummond report.

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International Women's Day march in Toronto

Photo: Jesse McLaren
On March 3, women from across Toronto took to the streets for International Women's Day.

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The commodification of children's play

Photo: Fiona L Cooper/Flickr
What are the implications for children and their caregivers when access to play spaces is limited?

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Columnists

The Right pushes more austerity, despite surplus

Photo: Jeremy Schultz/flickr

Last week, Germany completed its plan to provide free university tuition to all its students. It's an idea that no doubt would excite the hopes and dreams of young people in Canada -- which explains the need to snuff it out before it catches on.

Certainly, it's the kind of big idea that powerful interests here are keen to keep off the radar as Ottawa finds itself flush with surplus cash -- $6 billion next year, with bigger surpluses expected in future years.

Photo: 401(K) 2012/flickr
| October 2, 2014
Image: Flickr/Neil Winton
| September 19, 2014
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