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We need to keep Hydro One in public hands

Photo: flickr/ BriYYZ

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Undeniably, climate change is one of the greatest threats facing humanity. And nobody can dispute that Canada, once a leader in the fight to protect our environment, has become a global laughing stock to the ever-growing numbers of people around the world who understand action is needed.

We also know from poll after poll, that solving the climate crisis is a high priority for Canadians. So, why this rift between public will and political action?

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Columnists

Who profits from austerity?

Photo: RonF/The Weekly Bull/flickr

On Saturday, London rocked to the sounds of 250,000 marchers protesting austerity in the U.K. Organized by The People's Assembly Against Austerity, the day's events (marches were also held in Liverpool and Glasgow) announce the beginning of a campaign against the cutbacks to services by the Conservative government headed by David Cameron.

Recently returned to power with an unexpected majority, the Conservatives wants to resume the tight spending policies -- temporarily suspended in the run-up to the election -- that have worsened unemployment all over Europe.

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Photo: IMF headquarters. Credit: @mjb/flickr
| June 9, 2015
Columnists

Judging the odds for an election recession

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

Canada's first-quarter GDP report was not just "atrocious," as predicted by Stephen Poloz. It was downright negative: total real GDP shrank at an annualized rate of 0.6 per cent (fastest pace of decline since the 2008-09 recession). Nominal GDP fell faster (annualized rate of 3 per cent), as deflation took hold across the broader production economy (led, of course, by energy prices).

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Columnists

A sea change is coming to the politics of corporate tax rates

Photo: Cheryl DeWolfe/flickr

The biggest change in Canada's tax policy over the last generation was the steep reduction in corporate income taxes (CIT) engineered since 2000 at both the federal and provincial levels. Advocates of CIT cuts promised they would stimulate more business investment and thus generate trickle-down benefits for all Canadians. Free-market economists built theoretical models to show that lower corporate taxes would boost investment, productivity and even wages.

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Image: Chris Potter/flickr
| June 1, 2015

Syriza is facing down resistance

Photo: Flickr/Daniella Hartmann

The Syriza government faces great adversity of a European and Greek economic, political and technocratic machinery that is firmly in the hands of a powerful establishment.

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| May 18, 2015

Islanders want change: P.E.I. election 'a huge protest vote'

Photo: flickr/Robert Linsdell

The P.E.I. election is "a huge protest vote" with the NDP and the Greens taking 22 per cent of the popular vote, notes Charlottetown-based social justice activist Marian White.

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