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The great Canadian debate: Should we reform the Senate?

A People’s Senate for Canada: Not A Pipe Dream!

by Helen Forsey
(Fernwood Publishing,
2015;
$19.95)

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Should we get rid of the Senate? Reform it? Keep it the way it is? Every party has a different suggestion this election for what works best for the battered institution of "sober second thought." According to writer-activist Helen Forsey and her new book, A People's Senate for Canada: Not a Pipe Dream!, some options are far better than others.

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Write Along Radio

Reading Lolita in Tehran, Azar Nafisi, and the power of reading

July 2, 2015
| Have you heard of Reading Lolita in Tehran? Listen in as New York best-selling author, the passionate Azar Nafisi, shares on the magic of reading and how stories tell a nation’s true culture.
Length: 33:35 minutes (30.76 MB)

Searching for salvation: 'Binary Star's' journey across addiction, disease and abuse

Binary Star

by Sarah Gerard
(Two Dollar Radio,
2015;
$16.00)

"Sickness is reciprocal," says the unnamed narrator of Binary Star, Sarah Gerard's feverish debut novel. The narrator is anorexic and involved in a long-distance relationship with an abusive alcoholic who has latched onto a blurred vision of anarchist veganism.

"It's a symbiotic relationship of sickness," says Gerard. "It's something that the narrator shares with her culture, also shares with her boyfriend. She's battling within herself this desire to stay sick and this desire to live."

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128 km later: How to hold on after your life doesn't make sense

The Walking Man

by Paul Dore
(Iguana Books,
2015;
$19.99)

"Lemme just get this out of the goddam way; I'm nervous as all hell. Nervous because you may or may not relate to the mess that follows."

This is how Paul Dore's debut novel, The Walking Man, opens: an intimate conversation with the narrator, our unnamed protagonist. A bundle of nerves, the character spills out his anxieties, struggles with depression, fears of opening up to people, of never finding love.

This book is that over-sharing friend we all have, and yet readers should not be intimidated or scared off by its candidness.

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In conversation with author Doretta Lau

Photo: flickr/Florin Gorgan
Yutaka Dirks interviews author Doretta Lau and reviews her debut collection of short stories 'How Does A Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?'

Related rabble.ca story:

Doretta Lau sets a new standard in Canadian literature

How Does A Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?

by Doretta Lau
(Nightwood Editions,
2014;
$19.95)

Please support our coverage of democratic movements and become a monthly supporter of rabble.ca.

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Indigenous resistance in the face of Canadian colonialsim

Photo: flickr/Razer1953
Author James Daschuk discusses Canada's history of disease, deliberate starvation, ethnic cleansing, tar sands expansion, neglect of treaties and a legacy of colonialism of First Nations.

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'Clearing the Plains' confronts Canada's colonialism

Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life

by James Daschuk
(University of Regina Press,
2013;
$39.95)

Official bicentennial celebrations of the "affable drunk" who founded Canada will likely mask John A. Macdonald's history of racism and deliberate starvation of First Nations, and similar policies continue today with the tar sands and fracking expansion.

James Daschuk, author of Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life, addresses Canada's history of disease, deliberate starvation, ethnic cleansing, tar sands expansion, neglect of treaties and a legacy of colonialism that continues today.

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'Profiting Without Producing' stands to restrain finance and fight for socialism

Profiting Without Producing: How Finance Exploits Us All

by Costas Lapavitsas
(Verso Books,
2014;
$34.95)

Economics professor Costas Lapavitsas' new book Profiting Without Producing: How Finance Exploits Us All, delving into the elusive world of finance, that place where fortunes are made seemingly out of nothing, but with such dramatic impact on the world economy. Lapavitsas tackles one of the most innovative and perhaps most controversial concepts in political economy: financialization. Aaron Leonard recently corresponded with professor Lapavitsas via email to ask him about his new book and its wider implications.

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Capitalism needs to be disassembled, but first we need to know what it is

Photo: flickr/Nigel Hanlon
'Disassembly Required' is an excellent primer for anyone who knows they don't like capitalism, but don't know the history, how it works or how to critique it.

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