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'The Dogs Are Eating Them Now' begs for our collective attention

The Dogs are Eating them Now

by Graeme Smith
(Knopf Canada,
2013;
$32.00)

Canada will officially end its military engagement in Afghanistan in March 2014 after losing 158 Canadian Forces personnel and spending billions of dollars on the war effort. So, was it worth it?

You won't find the answer in Graeme Smith's award-winning retrospective The Dogs Are Eating Them Now on his time as a foreign correspondent for the Globe and Mail. In fact, you'll only find more questions that beg for answers -- and our collective attention.

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Child welfare system echoes residential schools to communities, hears tribunal

Photo: wikimedia commons/LAC PA|182251|3354514

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This week, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) heard from Elder Robert Joseph that there is a connection between residential schools and the large number of Indigenous children in child welfare.

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Canada's (not so incredible) shrinking federal government

| November 21, 2013
Columnists

Secret case keeps Freeman from coming home

Photo: darkroom productions/flickr

Anytime a government wants to hide its errors and illegality, it pulls down the shades of national security confidentiality and refuses to disclose any information. Time and again, the Canadian government's own cries for secrecy have been found to be without substance. Federal court decisions, judicial inquiries into complicity in torture, and various freedom of access to information requests have revealed the extent to which secrecy becomes the convenient way out from having to explain and be held accountable for lousy policy, inhumane actions and sheer incompetence.

The White Paper 1969

Pierre Trudeau and Jean Chretien authors of The White Paper 1969

The White Paper

Published in 1969, The White Paper was the Trudeau Government’s clumsy attempt to address the systemic inequalities between Indigenous people (referred to as Indians) and Settlers (referred to as Canadians). The proposed plan of action was intended to replace The Indian Act. Instead of actually dealing with problems of entrenched institutionalized racism The White Paper proposed that the government should eliminate the category of “Indian” over a five-year period.

What it meant

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Lapdog federal Ethics Commissioner again refuses to investigate a clear case

| May 10, 2013
Redeye

Why Omar Khadr should be freed

April 22, 2013
| Last September, Omar Khadr was transferred from Guantanamo Bay to the Millhaven maximum security prison in Kingston. Omar Khadr was taken into custody as a child soldier in Afghanistan in 2002.
Length: 12:34 minutes (11.51 MB)

Group calls on politicians across Canada to sign Democratic Good Government Pledge as their New Year's Resolution

| January 15, 2013
The F Word

Idle No More: Interview with Darla Goodwin

December 26, 2012
| The F Word's Ariana Barer and Charlene Sayo interview Darla Goodwin, the Vancouver representative of Idle No More, about the national movement for Indigenous rights in Canada.
Length: 25:12 minutes (46.15 MB)
May 31, 2012 |
Ruling concluded that CBSA had violated the law and committed an unfair labour practice by denying union representatives access to the workplace for the purpose of discussing collective bargaining.
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