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Literature Matters: Karen Solie and Esi Edugyan

Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 7:30pm

Location

Isabel Bader Theatre
93 Charles St. West
Toronto, ON
Canada
43° 40' 2.3952" N, 79° 23' 33.2988" W

The Avie Bennett Chair in Canadian Literature Presents:

Literature Matters

Featuring

Karen Solie: "On Folly: Poetry and Mistakes"

and Esi Edugyan: "The Wrong Door: The Responsibilities of Fiction in a Post-Truth World."

Followed by an interview with the two authors with Smaro Kamboureli.

Register for your free ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/literature-matters-karen-solie-esi-edugyan-tickets-30493905091?aff=efbevent

Needs No Introduction

Lawrence Hill on his novel, 'The Illegal'

October 18, 2016
| From Octopus Books in Ottawa, author and journalist Waubgeshig Rice talks to Lawrence Hill about his novel "The Illegal."
Length: 53:51 minutes (56.52 MB)

World Literacy Canada's 2016 Kama Reading Series: Hope and Wonder

Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Location

Gardiner Museum
111 Queens Park
Toronto
Canada
43° 40' 4.7784" N, 79° 23' 36.6468" W

The KAMA Reading Series has been World Literacy Canada's trademark event for the past 24 years. Acclaimed and local Canadian authors and writers participate in 5 evenings of reading, and join panel discussions with the audience. It's a night to celebrate great Canadian writing and storytelling, as well as an opportunity to discuss issues surrounding poverty and literacy around the world.

On March 30th, join us at the Gardiner Museum at 6:00PM for light refreshments, wine, and thought-provoking conversations on the them of Hope and Wonder with Madhur Anand, Gary Barwin, a Special Mystery Author and host Anne Giardini.

Date: May 25th, 2016

'Oscar of Between' pushes boundaries of identity, language and form

Oscar of Between: A Memoir of Identity and Ideas

by Betsy Warland
(Dagger Editions,
2016;
$21.95)

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When Betsy Warland finds herself single and without a sense of family at the age of 60, she escapes to London. Upon discovery that she has never learned the art of camouflage, she delves into nine-year journey -- taking the name Oscar -- to tell her story as "a person of between."

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World Literacy Canada's 2016 Kama Reading Series: Living and Dying

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Location

Gardiner Museum
111 Queens Park
Toronto, ON
Canada
43° 40' 4.7784" N, 79° 23' 36.6468" W

The KAMA Reading Series has been World Literacy Canada's trademark event for the past 24 years. Acclaimed and local Canadian authors and writers participate in 5 evenings of reading, and join panel discussions with the audience. It's a night to celebrate great Canadian writing and storytelling, as well as an opportunity to discuss issues surrounding poverty and literacy around the world.

On April 27th, join us at the Gardiner Museum at 6:00PM for light refreshments, wine, and thought-provoking conversations on the them of Love & Terror with Lynn Crosbie, Lynne Kutsukake, Sabrina Ramnanan, Trevor Cole and special host Arlene Perly Rae.

Date: April 27th, 2016

The power of memory and storytelling

Memory Serves

by Lee Maracle
(NeWest Press,
2015;
$24.95)

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Stories are an integral part of who we are as a people. So much so that I found myself unable to write about the power of storytelling and Lee Maracle's new book Memory Serves because it encapsulates that idea so completely.

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'Between the Cracks She Fell' explores urban landscapes and the ghosts that haunt us

Between the Cracks She Fell

by Lisa de Nikolits
(Inanna Publications,
2015;
$22.95)

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Cities are palimpsests. Like those washed-off scrolls ready to be reused by a scribe, the words that came before leaving spectral impressions on the page, cities are built, unbuilt and rebuilt, leaving behind evidence of lives lived and left. In this way, time is made circular, existing on top of itself. It is no wonder, then, that in such spaces we should encounter the ghosts of those who came before us and those who might come after.

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'Birdie' soars to new heights with 'bigelegance' and quiet strength

Birdie

by Tracey Lindberg
(HarperCollins Publishers,
2015;
22.99)

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Tracey Lindberg's debut novel Birdie is a celebration of Cree communities centered around the coming of age of a complex female protagonist.

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| December 17, 2015

Restoring disturbed nature: Two debut books of Canadian poetry

Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent; A New Index for Predicting Catastrophes

by Liz Howard; Madhur Anand
(McClelland & Stewart,
2015;
$18.95)

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Congrats to author Liz Howard for her Griffin Poetry Prize win for Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent!

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