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Needs No Introduction

Lawrence Hill on his novel, 'The Illegal'

October 18, 2016
| From Octopus Books in Ottawa, author and journalist Waubgeshig Rice talks to Lawrence Hill about his novel "The Illegal."
Length: 53:51 minutes (56.52 MB)

'Oscar of Between' pushes boundaries of identity, language and form

Oscar of Between: A Memoir of Identity and Ideas

by Betsy Warland
(Dagger Editions,
2016;
$21.95)

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When Betsy Warland finds herself single and without a sense of family at the age of 60, she escapes to London. Upon discovery that she has never learned the art of camouflage, she delves into nine-year journey -- taking the name Oscar -- to tell her story as "a person of between."

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The power of memory and storytelling

Memory Serves

by Lee Maracle
(NeWest Press,
2015;
$24.95)

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Stories are an integral part of who we are as a people. So much so that I found myself unable to write about the power of storytelling and Lee Maracle's new book Memory Serves because it encapsulates that idea so completely.

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'Between the Cracks She Fell' explores urban landscapes and the ghosts that haunt us

Between the Cracks She Fell

by Lisa de Nikolits
(Inanna Publications,
2015;
$22.95)

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Cities are palimpsests. Like those washed-off scrolls ready to be reused by a scribe, the words that came before leaving spectral impressions on the page, cities are built, unbuilt and rebuilt, leaving behind evidence of lives lived and left. In this way, time is made circular, existing on top of itself. It is no wonder, then, that in such spaces we should encounter the ghosts of those who came before us and those who might come after.

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'Birdie' soars to new heights with 'bigelegance' and quiet strength

Birdie

by Tracey Lindberg
(HarperCollins Publishers,
2015;
22.99)

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Tracey Lindberg's debut novel Birdie is a celebration of Cree communities centered around the coming of age of a complex female protagonist.

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| December 17, 2015

'Night Moves' brings new light to the shadows of Canada's North

Night Moves

by Richard Van Camp
(Enfield & Wizenty,
2015;
$19.95 )

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"Why do you place such haunting red hand prints throughout all of your paintings?" asks one character to another in 'Skull.Full.Of.Rust' one of the many short stories in Dene author Richard Van Camp's latest collection, Night Moves.

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Restoring disturbed nature: Two debut books of Canadian poetry

Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent; A New Index for Predicting Catastrophes

by Liz Howard; Madhur Anand
(McClelland & Stewart,
2015;
$18.95)

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Congrats to author Liz Howard for her Griffin Poetry Prize win for Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent!

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Photo: flickr/ futureatlas.com
| August 17, 2015

Amber Dawn connects luxury and logic between body and soul

Where the words end and my body begins

by Amber Dawn
(Arsenal Pulp Press,
2015;
$14.95)

The first time I read Amber Dawn's Where the Words End and My Body Begins, I was standing over my kitchen counter peeling and eating tangerines. It wasn't my plan to dive in right away but I didn't want to do the dishes and it had just come in the mail, replete with a soft pastel cover that is at once sugary and arcane, paradisal and dismal.

There I was with wet fingers, slurping all over this freshly published collection.

"you never considered yourself femme"

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