canadian miningSyndicate content

Harper government conducts surveillance of First Nations instead of resolving violations of Indigenous peoples' rights

Unceded Algonquin Territory/Ottawa, December 6, 2011 -- The Defenders of the Land (DotL), a network of Indigenous Communities, on Tuesday condemned reports that in 2007, the Harper government established a national and international police surveillance network to spy on Indigenous Peoples and their supporters for defending Indigenous Peoples' self-determination and land rights. The RCMP surveillance operation shared its findings with private industry.

embedded_video

Mayan victims of gang rapes announce lawsuit against Canadian mining company

For immediate release: March 28, 2011

Toronto, Canada and El Estor, Guatemala:

Rosa Elbira Coc Ich and ten other indigenous Mayan Q'eqchi' women filed a lawsuit Monday against Canadian mining companies HMI Nickel, and its corporate owner, HudBay Minerals, regarding mining-related gang-rapes suffered by them near a Canadian-owned mining site in Guatemala.

On January 17, 2007, the eleven women were gang-raped by mining company security personnel, police and military during the forceful expulsion of Mayan Q'eqchi' families from their farms and homes in the community of "Lote Ocho". These armed evictions were sought by HMI Nickel in relation to its Fenix mining project, located on the north shores of Lake Izabal, Guatemala.

embedded_video

Ignatieff and the death of Liberal class

On Oct. 27, the House of Commons narrowly defeated a private members bill, C-300, aimed at ensuring mining companies are accountable and responsible for human rights and environmental standards abroad.

Despite being a Liberal lead private member's bill by MP John McKay, Ignatieff's Whip, Marcel Proulx in caucus during the week of the vote, was quietly encouraging Liberal MPs to stay away from the third reading vote on Wednesday evening to ensure its defeat.

In apparent contradiction, a backgrounder was sent from Ignatieff's office to the caucus members just before the vote that appeared to support the bill.

This is how it read:

embedded_video

Did KAIROS defunding come down to mining interests and one hand-written note?

An internal memo to CIDA Minister Bev Oda recommending KAIROS continue receiving funding from the aid agency was modified under mysterious circumstances shortly before or after it was signed, reinforcing allegations of political interference.

Meanwhile, other documents show that before it was cut as a CIDA partner, KAIROS was engaged in a heated back-and-forth with diplomats at Canada's embassies in Mexico and Guatemala over the NGO's work on corporate social responsibility and mining.

KAIROS is a faith-based development group that counts among its 11 members the Catholic Church's Development and Peace, the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund, the Presbyterian Church of Canada, and the United Church of Canada.

embedded_video

Mining plans endanger a fifth of the great Peel wilderness

Duo Lakes, the Peel Watershed, Yukon. Photo: Shannon Thompson
Yukon First Nations mobilize to protect traditional territories in the Peel River Watershed in the northeast of the province, and gain attention from around the world.

Related rabble.ca story:

Mining plans endanger a fifth of the great Peel wilderness

Na-cho Nyak Dun elder Jimmy Johnny describes his love for the Peel Watershed in the Yukon, where 20 per cent is under threat from mining plans. Photo: Shannon Thompson

In an exclusive for rabble.ca, Journalist Shannon Thompson spent three days in August travelling the pristine waters of the Three Rivers area of the Peel River Watershed in The Yukon, looking at what would be lost should mining development be allowed to proceed. She was a guest of the Yukon Conservation Society and several First Nations communities.

Duo Lakes, Yukon -- Na-cho Nyak Dun elder Jimmy Johnny would rather be picking blueberries and wandering off alone to scout for animals. But today he has a job to do: tell reporters and southerners like me why we should care about the fight to protect the Peel River Watershed in the northeast Yukon.

embedded_video

Canadian gold mine plan stirs anger in Central America

Environmental activists in Las Crucitas protest against the open-pit Canadian gold mining project. Photo provided by: Centro Humboldt
A contentious open-pit gold mine is upsetting locals along the Nicaraguan-Costa Rican border, but the Canadian company behind it could get millions if the contract is cancelled.

Related rabble.ca story:

Canadian gold mine plan stirs anger in Central America

Canadian gold mining explorations in Central America might be close to expanding with a new project potentially going ahead in Costa Rica.

Industrias Infinito S.A., owned by the Calgary-based Infinito Gold Ltd., is a mine company that is trying to win a legal battle with the new Costa Rican government to push for the Crucitas project in the small community of Las Crucitas, north of the border of Nicaragua.

Laura Chinchilla, Costa Rica's new president, revised the contract that former president Óscar Arias signed with the Canadian firm months before reaching the end of his presidential term.

But Chinchilla is under pressure from environmental groups, such as "Ni una Mina más" translated as "Not a single mine," to put a stop to the project.

embedded_video

Syndicate content