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Photo: BC Gov Photos/flickr
| June 26, 2015
Photo by Brad Caribou Legs Firth
| June 23, 2015
Photo by Bradley Caribou Legs Firth, Three Valley Lake, Revelstoke, B.C.
| June 22, 2015
Photo: Toban B./flickr
| May 19, 2015

How can a Canadian mining company sue El Salvador for $301 million?

Photo: Mining Justice Solidarity Network

Friday morning, a delegation of anti-mining activists, along with one in a kangaroo costume, made a visit to the Toronto office of Industry Canada and the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development. 

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May 8, 2015 |
A Salvadoran delegation will visit Canada next week to discuss how investor-state arbitration threatens democratic decision-making, public health and the environment here and beyond our borders.
Columnists

'Our future generations are not for sale': Marilyn Baptiste wins Goldman Environmental Prize

Baptiste stands over a map of Tsilhqo'tin Territory. Photo: Goldman Environmenta

Marilyn Baptiste of the Xeni Gwet'in First Nation in British Columbia has won the prestigious $175,000 Goldman Prize for her five-year effort to prevent construction of the Prosperity gold and copper mine 600 kilometres north of Vancouver.

"I hope the Goldman award will bring world recognition to help us protect our land," Baptiste told DeSmog Canada. "We'd like to improve our lives, but our land and water comes first."

That simple statement echoes the words of millions of Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world facing governments and industries intent on extracting minerals, oil, coal, gas and timber from their lands.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
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| April 10, 2015
February 27, 2015 |
Canadian diplomats in Mexico were complicit in Toronto-based Excellon Resources Inc.’s efforts to avoid redressing a violated land use contract and poor working conditions.
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