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The words of truth and reconciliation need to be put into action

In This Together: Fifteen Stories of Truth and Reconciliation

by Edited by Danielle Metcalfe-Chenail
(Brindle & Glass,
2016;
$19.95)

No matter who you are -- Indigenous or non-Indigenous -- the words truth and reconciliation can be hard to swallow.

When you hear the words over and over again, you begin to tire of what can be said, especially when these words seem to be popular in today's politics. These terms, truth and reconciliation, are based upon the actions and words of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission that was put together to deal with Canada's genocidal residential school system and its survivors. 

Aside from the work of the actual Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the words truth and reconciliation are now largely used as a tool to get Indigenous and non-Indigenous people to work together.

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Photo: Steve Harris/flickr
| September 1, 2016
| August 15, 2016

Six pervasive myths about Canada we must stop believing

Image: Dave Molenhuis

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After Brexit, the attempted military coup in Turkey, the murders of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, Donald Trump's grip on the Republican nomination, the collapse of the Democratic National Convention, and the numerous terrorist attacks around the world, many Canadians are relieved to call Canada home.

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The integral role of Indigenous women's knowledge

Living on the Land: Indigenous Women's Understanding of Place

by Edited by Nathalie Kermoal and Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez
(Athabasca University Press,
2016;
$27.95)

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Study into the Indigenous ways of knowing and knowledge has been largely conducted from a western standpoint and subsequently focuses on the male point of view. This creates not only a gendered analysis but an incomplete picture that ignores the knowledge traditionally held and communicated by Indigenous women.

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WATCH: June 17 walk to protect Ottawa's sacred site

On June 17, Algonquin Elders invite you to a massive walk to protect the Asinabka sacred site at Chaudière Falls, Ottawa, also known as Akikodjiwan.

For over 200 years Anishnabe / Algonquin Elders of Ontario and Quebec have asked the Crown and later the Government of Canada that their Sacred Site be returned to their care.

In 2012 the ConservativegGovernment abandoned the promise of the return of the Sacred Site and encouraged private ownership and massive development.

In 2014 a letter of intent between the City of Ottawa, private industry and the NCC announced the building of condominiums and multiple businesses on the Sacred Islands. 

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June 10, 2016 |
Justin Trudeau told a group of U.S. students that Canada was suited to peacekeeping roles because it lacks "some of the baggage that so many other Western countries have..." Oh, really?

Avi Lewis speaks in support of Grassy Narrows

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Almost half a century ago, a pulp and paper company dumped tons of mercury into the English Wabigoon River system in Northwestern Ontario.

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Talking Radical Radio

Colonialism No More

May 25, 2016
| Su Deranger and Robyn Pitawanakwat talk about Colonialism No More, an action in solidarity with Attawapiskat First Nation and #OccupyINAC that is ongoing in Regina, Saskatchewan.
Length: 28:30 minutes (26.1 MB)
Image: Wikimedia Commons
| May 18, 2016
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