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First Nations meeting on Jan. 24 is a make-it or break-it moment

First Nations solidarity. Photo: Mary Kosta/Flickr
Leaders of indigenous heritage pack their bags for one more effort to achieve peace and friendship with fellow Canadians.

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Attawapiskat and colonialism: Seeing the forest and the trees

If you can cut through the racism, ignorance, and half-baked opinions of pundits, politicians and sound-bite media, most folks will realize that Attawapiskat and many other First Nations have been labouring under the repression of colonialism far too long.

The antidote for poverty is self-determination and no one can give you that. You have to stand up and take action yourself to make it happen. Colonialism does not give way on its own; it must be defeated through vigorous and enlightened opposition.

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Wikileaks: Colonial limbo a deliberate attempt to keep islanders from homeland

The Ground-Based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance System (GEODSS) facility at Diego Garcia is one of three operational sites worldwide. Photo: United States Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. John Rohrer/Wikipedia.

Six months ago, I wrote a piece for rabble.ca describing the appalling treatment of the people of the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean by the British government. 

The islands were purchased by the government of Britain in 1966 from Seychellois Chagos Agalega Company, with the initial intention of running them as a U.K. government-owned plantation enterprise. This proved less profitable than the establishment of Cold War strategic military bases, so the islanders were removed.

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Columnists

Telling the truth about Thanksgiving

Does anyone ever wonder when "Columbus Day" will no longer be a nationally "celebrated" holiday? I mean really and truly -- when do y'all think that will happen?

In my opinion, it's not as if the information does not exist out there which explicitly states that no, Columbus was never even near the continental mass of what's now known as "America". The "great" navigator that he was didn't even know where he was going and never washed up here -- ever.

What he did do with the full backing of the voyage was ensue genocide, apartheid, and colonization -- all whose affects are deeply entrenched in existing assimilative federal policies, hierarchical societal structures, and the realities of Indigenous communities here and around the world.

Indian Ocean islanders in 44 years of colonial limbo

The Ground-Based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance System (GEODSS) facility at Diego Garcia is one of three operational sites worldwide. Photo: United States Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. John Rohrer/Wikipedia.
The people of the Chagos Islands were removed by the British government in the 1960s to make way for U.S. bases -- and the people remain stuck.

Related rabble.ca story:

Indian Ocean islanders in 44 years of colonial limbo

The Ground-Based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance System (GEODSS) facility at Diego Garcia is one of three operational sites worldwide. Photo: United States Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. John Rohrer/Wikipedia.

In 1966, England was all about the soccer, the Labour Party and the Beatles. The country had just won the World Cup and things were swinging with 1960s euphoria and happiness.

But it was also the year which marked the commencement of an exercise to depopulate the Chagos Islands, a coral archipelago in the Indian Ocean, approximately 1,600 km north-west of Mauritius. The indigenous community were soon to have their homes taken away from them in a shameful act of latter-day colonial vandalism.

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Redeye

Book launch: Red Skin, White Masks

November 18, 2014
| Glen Coulthard's book is for the generation of First Nations activists who want to change things entirely. Coulthard tackles current Indigenous-settler relations in Canada, drawing on Marx and Fanon.
Length: 55:14 minutes (50.58 MB)
| October 13, 2014

What we're (not) talking about when we talk about the Franklin expeditions

"The Arctic Council planning a search for Sir John Franklin," by Stephen Pearce

It was beginning to seem like it would never happen. For a sixth year, the Harper government was sending a team into the Arctic to search for the lost Franklin ships. The expeditions were starting to seem as doomed as Franklin's own: the British explorer famously got stuck in Arctic ice during his 1845 expedition to navigate the Northwest Passage. He never made it. Franklin and all 128 men from his two British navy ships -- HMS Erebus and HMS Terror -- escaped to land, where one by one they died from a somewhat predictable inability to survive in the Arctic environment, resorting to a bit of cannibalism along the way.

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