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Image: flickr/Anonymous9000
| August 13, 2015
| August 12, 2015

Thirty-seven per cent of Canadians think torture could be justified

"If the Canadian government used torture against people 'suspected' of terrorism, do you think this could be justified?" Thirty-seven per cent of people polled said yes.

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Canadians get on board the torture train

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

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Just before the annual orgy of Canada Day self-celebration, the Pew Research Center released a poll revealing that over one-third of Canadians supported the use of torture. This was no late April Fool's joke, but rather a shocking figure that was part of a global survey on U.S. foreign policy and the use of what has been referred to as "enhanced interrogation techniques."

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The legal vengeance case of Omar Khadr

Photo: Khadr family/Wikimedia Commons

A few years ago when some Canadian Muslim men, accused of terrorism, challenged the Canadian government through the courts to ask for their legal rights, voices within the intelligence community rose up and insinuated that these men were waging "judicial jihad."

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Canadians have united to reject fear and stop Bill C-51. Will the government listen?

It's rare in Canadian politics to see intense public interest in government legislative proposals -- let alone to see Canadians take to the streets in the tens of thousands to protest a piece of legislation by name.

Yet that's exactly what has happened in the case of Bill C-51, which critics, including The Globe and Mail's editorial team, say will undermine basic democratic values and lead to the creation of a "secret police force" in Canada.

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| April 27, 2015
Photo by Sam Beebe via Flickr
| March 30, 2015

How to protect your privacy when Bill C-51 becomes law

Photo: Susan on the Soapbox
A covert intelligence gathering agency becomes a covert enforcement agency? No problem!

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Columnists

Lost in the '50s with Harper's anti-terror pablum

Photo: James Vaughan/flickr

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Last Friday, viewers of the CBC's flagship news program, The National, could be forgiven for thinking they were back in the Leave it to Beaver 1950s. Indeed, they ran a saccharine story that would have done proud former Soviet and East German state news agencies. In fact, had it run during the Cold War, it would hopefully be touted in today's journalism schools as an embarrassing parody of what their profession is supposed to be.

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