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Photo: flickr/ Obert Madondo
| January 14, 2016

No to surveillance: Unions push Liberals to repeal Bill C-51

Photo: flickr/Jeremy Board

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Labour groups continue to urge the federal government to take action on Bill C-51, which was passed in June and remains in place. The law vastly expands government surveillance, provides new powers to the police and CSIS and may criminalize ordinary political activity.

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Image: Flickr/Cannabis Culture
| October 9, 2015
Image: flickr/Anonymous9000
| August 13, 2015
| August 12, 2015

Thirty-seven per cent of Canadians think torture could be justified

"If the Canadian government used torture against people 'suspected' of terrorism, do you think this could be justified?" Thirty-seven per cent of people polled said yes.

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Canadians get on board the torture train

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Just before the annual orgy of Canada Day self-celebration, the Pew Research Center released a poll revealing that over one-third of Canadians supported the use of torture. This was no late April Fool's joke, but rather a shocking figure that was part of a global survey on U.S. foreign policy and the use of what has been referred to as "enhanced interrogation techniques."

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The legal vengeance case of Omar Khadr

Photo: Khadr family/Wikimedia Commons

A few years ago when some Canadian Muslim men, accused of terrorism, challenged the Canadian government through the courts to ask for their legal rights, voices within the intelligence community rose up and insinuated that these men were waging "judicial jihad."

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Canadians have united to reject fear and stop Bill C-51. Will the government listen?

It's rare in Canadian politics to see intense public interest in government legislative proposals -- let alone to see Canadians take to the streets in the tens of thousands to protest a piece of legislation by name.

Yet that's exactly what has happened in the case of Bill C-51, which critics, including The Globe and Mail's editorial team, say will undermine basic democratic values and lead to the creation of a "secret police force" in Canada.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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| April 27, 2015
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