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Art on the move: Train of Thought explores treaties and decolonization in cities across Canada

Photos: Liam Coo Jumblies Theater (used with permission)

Train of Thought, an artistic journey across Canada consisting of Indigenous and non-Indigenous voices, pulled into Toronto last week. 

On Wednesday, I found myself sitting cross-legged in Ange Loft's workshop -- described as 'quick theatre creation using audio' in the program.

I had my brown sheet of paper in front of me and my blue oil pastel in hand, ready to be inspired by the interview with Lee Maracle playing on the speakers.

The interviewer asked Maracle how she felt about treaties.

"It's sort of like this," Maracle begins. "You had a house, and the neighbour moves into your house. Pretty soon he kicks you out. It's still your house, and you will always believe it's your house."

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| February 24, 2015
Image: Flickr/Nadine Wills
| October 22, 2014

Watch: Idle No More at the People's Climate March in New York

Indigenous leaders at the People's Climate March in New York speak to the urgency of climate change and the need for all of us to be #IdleNoMore. From the Amazon to the Arctic, Indigenous Peoples are defending our climate and teaching allies about how extractive industries are directly connected to sovereignty, colonization, and violence against Indigenous women.

Thanks to Ulali for the beautiful and powerful music!

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"Be a Good Girl" - Tania Willard
| July 24, 2014

Decolonization 101: Class war and colonization

Image: Wikimedia Commons
The following is a speech by Natalie Knight delivered at "Decolonization 101," a panel organized by Streams of Justice on June 2, 2014.

Related rabble.ca story:

Image: Wikimedia Commons
| June 13, 2014

Honour missing and murdered Indigenous women and refuse to live quietly

Graphic: Indigenous Nationhood Movement
Continue reading the #ItEndsHere series on missing and murdered Indigenous women with this piece on honouring the women lost too soon.

Related rabble.ca story:

#ItEndsHere: Refuse to live quietly!

Graphic: Indigenous Nationhood Movement

The #ItEndsHere: Confronting the Crisis of Colonial Gender Violence series originally ran on Indigenous Nationhood Movement.

"I think you're holding back. Tell them they're wrong and tell them why they're wrong," he said to me.

"Just like that?!" I asked. My voice exposing discomfort with his suggestion.

"Yeah," he replied nonchalantly.

"I can't do that.”

"Why not?”

"Because it sounds so confident," I said without a trace of hesitation in my voice.

"And…why don't you want to be confident?" he asked, pushing me a little further to where I needed to be, where I needed to get to.

Silence.

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#ItEndsHere: We live in the spirit of our ancestors

Graphic: Indigenous Nationhood Movement

The #ItEndsHere: Confronting the Crisis of Colonial Gender Violence series originally ran on Indigenous Nationhood Movement.

The history of violence against Indigenous people is woven into the colonization of our Indigenous territories. Our bones and blood make up the fabric of "Canada."

Through the process of âsotamâtowin, (Sacred Agreement/Treaty) and through the power of the oskiciya (the Pipe Stems), our ancestors agreed to share these territories with Euro-Canadian people. The numbered treaties were a result of these negotiations and form the largest landmass in Canada.

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