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| October 10, 2013
Redeye

Quantifying junk food risk

February 25, 2013
| Billions of people around the world can't afford to eat food that is good for their health. Gerardo Otero is trying to establish a way to measure this risk for people in countries around the world.
Length: 19:17 minutes (17.66 MB)

Locavore

locavores focus their diets on supporting local economies and farmers

Locavores are folks who only eat food that is locally produced and sold. It's an act of resistance to the commercialization of food production and a commitment to support local economies and farmers.

The idea of eating local was popularized by the ecologist Gary Paul Nabham in the early 2000s. Organized awareness campaigns in Canada and the United States brought the idea of the "100 mile diet" (only eating food produced within 100 miles) to kitchen tables worldwide.

 

What's local

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Veganize it!

The Complete Guide to Vegan Food Substitutions

by Celine Steen and Joni Marie Newman
(Fair Winds Press,
2010;
$20.99)

Just like any good chef, a vegan chef needs to be equipped with the right tools: fresh plant-based ingredients, a sharp knife, and -- of course -- a few good books. Over the course of rabble.ca's vegan challenge, the book lounge will provide a sampling of some recently published books available for vegans and aspiring vegans.

This is the second of a two-part series. Read the first part here!

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Comments

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Chowin' down vegan style

Ripe from Around Here: A Vegan Guide to Local and Sustainable Eating

by jae steele
(Arsenal Pulp Press,
2010;
$24.95)

Just like any good chef, a vegan chef needs to be equipped with the right tools: fresh plant-based ingredients, a sharp knife, and -- of course -- a few good books. Over the course of rabble.ca's vegan challenge, the book lounge will provide a sampling of some recently published books available for vegans and aspiring vegans. Here is part two....

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Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
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  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
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| March 17, 2011
| February 17, 2011
Columnists

McGuinty government rewarding those at the top and squeezing those at the bottom

One of the depressing aspects of the last few decades is the ease with which seemingly normal people walk obliviously past the aching pools of humanity spread out on our sidewalks.

At what point will people start looking up from their iPhones -- at least momentarily -- and think: Something must be done.

That moment should have come with the recent axing of Ontario's "special diet allowance," in which Dalton McGuinty's government literally took food out of the mouths of hungry people, in the name of deficit reduction.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Fat for thought

Lessons from the Fat-o-sphere: Quit Dieting and Declare a Truce with Your Body

by Kate Harding and Marianne Kirby
(Perigree,
2009;
$17.50)
In a perfect world, this book wouldn't exist. Not because Lessons from the Fat-o-sphere isn't engaging or informative -- on the contrary, it's a quick and often eye-opening read -- but because it reaffirms that we are still a society at war with our bodies.

From breast implants and Botox to skin bleaching and anti-aging creams, a woman's physical appearance is seen as something to alter and improve upon. Witness the plight of Hollywood starlet Mary-Kate Olsen: For years, fashion magazines maligned her for being too thin. Now that she's sporting a fuller figure, she stands accused of letting herself go.

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Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
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  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
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Redeye

No place for fish in a sustainable diet

July 24, 2009
| Ocean Wise, Seafood Watch and similar programs offer consumers the opportunity to select more sustainable seafood. Jennifer Jacquet says the choice is essentially meaningless.
Length: 10:06
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