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Welcome to Wynnetario

Dear Kathleen Wynne, You're right, it's your job. It's your job to stop the cops, stop the violence, stop the discrimination.

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Pussy, Pride and police: From bathhouses to Black Lives Matter

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When I was in my mid-20s I attended my very first women's bathhouse event, The Pussy Palace, which was raided that same night by the Toronto Police in 2000.

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B.C. leads the way in trans health, but change is slow

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Transgender rights in Canada are gaining attention, including the introduction of Bill C-16. However, one issue the community is still facing is the need for quality, trans-competent health care across the country.

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Trans health care in Canada: A provincial lottery

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If last month's attack on the Centre Métropolitain de Chirurgie in Montreal revealed anything, it's the dire lack of surgery resources for trans people in Canada.

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| June 28, 2016
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Redress is overdue for targets of Canada's no-fly list

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It has now been five months since we started hearing and reading about Canadian kids affected by additional security screening measures when they try to board a plane, and unfortunately, the situation hasn't improved much since.

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The price of acceptance: Immigrants with disabilities in a system of disadvantage

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Over the last few weeks, we learned that Felipe Montoya and his family were denied permanent resident status in Canada because his child Nico is a person with Down Syndrome.

As community members and service providers who work to bring greater attention to the barriers and challenges some of the most marginalized people in Ontario experience because of race, disability and immigration status, we have heard of many such cases.

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From exploited to supported: Phasing out Canada's lowest wage work programs

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Ontario service organization Community Living Algoma officially ended its sheltered workshop program in September.

The Sault Ste. Marie group, headed by executive director John Policicchio, began operating the program in the 1960s. 

"By the early 1990s there was somewhere close to 130 people who attended the sheltered workshop," Policicchio said.   

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Exploitative practices of disabled workers persist across Canada

Photo: flickr/ Chris

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Image: Flickr/Angel Ortega
| March 11, 2016
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