economic developmentSyndicate content

Photo: Guillaume Paumier/flickr
| September 17, 2015
Photo: BC Gov Photos/flickr
| May 11, 2015
Columnists

Reducing pollution to improve health should be a policy priority

The Quibú River, running through the El Náutico neighbourhood in Havana, is alwa

UXBRIDGE (IPS) -- Pollution is likely to be the most pressing global health issue in the coming years without effective prevention and clean-up efforts, experts say.

Air, water and soil pollution already kills nearly nine million people a year and cripples the health of more than 200 million people worldwide. Far more people die from pollution than from malaria and HIV/AIDS combined.

Development and rising pollution levels remain closely linked, as clearly evidenced in China and India. However, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) offer a major opportunity to curb pollution and turn economies around the world towards clean and green development pathways.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Columnists

Who will save Canada's economy from Harper and the CEOs?

Photo: pmwebphotos/flickr

However you see it -- as separate from society or integral to it -- Canada's "economy" is increasingly at the mercy of a risk-averse, inept corporate elite addicted to government tax breaks, and an ideologically addled government which more than anything else is simply incompetent. It is a deadly combination -- a sort of dumb and dumber team slowly dragging us backwards at a time when the world is just hoping there won't be another economic collapse.

In this there is little that is really new. It just keeps getting worse, and seems that few in positions to challenge the situation or even expose it are willing to do so. It stems from both moral decay in academia, and political cowardice on the part of opposition parties afraid to seriously challenge the status quo.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
By Timkal (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.
| August 29, 2014
Photo: Shell/flickr
| July 17, 2014

Indigenous protests at Mt. Klappan show respect for the land

Photo: wikimedia commons

Please support our coverage of democratic movements and become a monthly supporter of rabble.ca.

From tar sands in Alberta, to wind farms and gravel quarries in Ontario, to pipelines in British Columbia, resource conflicts in Canada often arise over different ideas about how land should be used. As summer approaches, such a conflict seems certain to resume in northwestern British Columbia over a planned coal mine.

A dispute between Aboriginal Tahltans and Fortune Minerals over the Arctos Anthracite project in the Klappan region (known popularly as the Sacred Headwaters) reflects an age-old debate: Use the land by taking something from it or by leaving it alone.

embedded_video

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Photo: Tony Hall/flickr
| April 15, 2014
Columnists

Boosting the local economy through a Nova Scotia dollar

Photo: woody1778a/flickr

You can change the conversation. Chip in to rabble's donation drive today!

So let's start the new year with adventures in economic development. The Ivany commission on the new economy is due to report in a few weeks, and in case they missed it, here's one last idea for their consideration: the Nova Scotia dollar.

Yes, yes, I know. Me, too. When I first heard it, I thought: another one for the nutty ideas bin. But you never know, so I gave the guy who raised it a hearing -- a fellow named Ty Savoy, who says he's trying to get his one-man upholstery cleaning business in the Halifax area going, but who also dabbles in ideas.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Photo: Mel Watkins
| November 29, 2013
Syndicate content