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'All for ourselves and nothing for other people': The takeover of economics by neoliberalism

Image: Adbusters/flickr

All for ourselves, and nothing for other people, seems, in every age of the world, to have been the vile maxim of the masters of mankind.

-- Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations

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Columnists

Instead of following Trump's money, Canada can choose a better path

PMO Photo by Adam Scotti

Asked about Donald Trump, former prime minister Brian Mulroney responded, "he is a real gentleman." For Mulroney, a lifelong friend of everything American, Trump will be good for Canada. He thinks the U.S. president and Justin Trudeau will develop a productive friendship.

Mulroney is merely the opening act in what will be a major Canadian media campaign to "normalize" the president-elect and showcase his program. Canadians will be expected to discount what Trump has said about women, Mexicans, Muslims or immigrants, as has Brian Mulroney, and another Trump Florida neighbour, Conrad Black. Big business voices will want citizens to focus on what President Trump and Canada can accomplish together.

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Failure of democracy has many root causes

Image: Prachatai/flickr

The failure of democracy? An academic study published last summer, which is rather suddenly being hailed in places like the New York Times, claims "an entire global generation has lost faith in democracy." Citizens "have grown jaded." This applies to youth especially, who call elections "unimportant" and say "a democratic political system" is a "bad" way to run things.

But is it really so? Young Americans who enthused over Bernie Sanders in the primaries, skipped the election because it wasn't democratic enough. People in Greece, Spain or Italy, left old parties and built new ones for similar reasons.

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Denying globalization's downside won't stop right-wing populism

Photo: Martin Schulz/European Union 2016 - European Parliament/flickr

I was somewhat surprised to see Stephen Poloz recently urging economists to do more work identifying and disseminating research on the supposed benefits of free trade. That's slightly beyond his job description (perhaps more fitting with his last position as head of Export Development Canada). But like economic leaders elsewhere in the world, Mr. Poloz is obviously concerned with the disintegration of popular support for neoliberal free trade deals. That disintegration will have tectonic economic and political consequences.

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David Hughes
| June 3, 2016
Columnists

Canadians need more than celebrity from Justin Trudeau

Photo: World Bank Photo Collection/flickr

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It was a night for nostalgia, the eighth and last White House Correspondents Dinner for U.S. President Barack Obama. The one-time Harvard Law Review editor and community organizer, a basketball-savvy president with worldwide appeal, was doing his final stand-up before the audience of media, political and Hollywood stars.

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Canada's monetary policy: Capital flows while Team Trudeau sleeps

Photo: Aaron Strout/flickr

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United Technologies, a U.S. company flush with yearly profits of $7.6 billion, last week closed an Indiana air-conditioner manufacturing factory, and transferred over 2,000 jobs to Mexico.

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Hugh Mackenzie
| January 11, 2016
Photo: flickr/ Prime Minister of Canada
| December 2, 2015

Alberta NDP sticks to its guns

Photo provided by David Climenhaga
Alberta Premier rejects "immediate, massive, reckless cuts" proposed by the opposition and vows to stay the course on her government’s chosen role as economic shock absorber.

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