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Deficit or not, Harper still failed to strengthen economy and create jobs

Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper

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Acres of newsprint have been devoted in recent weeks to the possibility that lower oil prices might push the federal budget back into a deficit position. As I argue in my column, this drama is mostly political theatre -- and progressives should be cautious about accidentally accepting the Conservative frame for this debate.

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Columnists

Dismantling the myth of Canada's economic recovery

Photo: Simon King/flickr

Ever since the global meltdown of 2008, it's been an article of faith in Canadian economics that we somehow handled the whole mess better than the rest of the world. No banks collapsed. Our recession, while painful, was not nearly as bad as America's. Our deficits were smaller, and will disappear sooner. Not surprisingly, there's a strong political aspect to that smug mindset: Federal Conservatives never tire of claiming credit for this supposedly superior performance.

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Global crisis and alternatives: A conversation with David Harvey

Photo: flickr/Peter-Ashley Jackson

When David Harvey looks at the global economic crisis, he sees a situation that demands alternatives be found. Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the Graduate Centre of the City University of New York (CUNY) and is currently a visiting scholar at the National Centre for Strategy on the Right to Space (CENEDET) at the National Institute of Post-Graduate Studies (IAEN) in Quito, Ecuador.

Harvey sat down with Patrick Clark, a PhD Candidate in Political Science at Carleton University and a researcher at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences in Ecuador, at the National Institute of Post-Graduate Studies (IAEN) in Quito, Ecuador.

 

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How systemic problems keep women's wages low

Photo: flickr/ Dee West (Formerly deedoucette)
On #EqualPayDay2014, we need to recognize the gross unfairness of women's wages and call for pay equity legislation and living wages to address increasing inequality.

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