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A look inside Egypt

Photo by Ali Mustafa.
Toronto-based activist Ali Mustafa recently captured powerful images from the ongoing struggle in Egypt.

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The Egyptian revolution continues: An interview with journalist Hossam El-Hamalawy

Hossam el-Hamalawy is a leading Egyptian journalist, photographer, and socialist activist from Cairo who maintains the widely followed blog 3arabawy. He is also actively involved in the Revolutionary Socialists, the Center for Socialist Studies, and the Workers Democratic Party. Canadian journalist Ali Mustafa had the fortunate opportunity to sit down and talk with him about his views on the current state of the Egyptian revolution following the latest revolt in Tahrir Square this past November, arguably the fiercest and most important display of popular resistance to the ruling military regime to take place since the January 25 uprising that toppled former president Hosni Mubarak some ten months ago.
 

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Egyptian feminism has unity and the moral high ground

Nawal el Saadawi at the 4th Annual Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture in 2009. Photo: Beowulf Sheehan/PEN American Center
Arab feminists have kick-started many critical debates among contemporary Muslims; their originality of thought wields far-reaching and profound influence.

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Adhaf Soueif reports from Tahrir Square

Author and journalist Adhaf Soueif reports from Tahrir Square reports on Feb. 3.
Living revolution: The sights, sounds and hopes of Egypt.

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My mother's account of Tahrir Square attacks

Protesters in Tahrir Square, Cairo, with identification taken from a pro-Mubarak rioter which shows that person to be a member of security forces. Feb. 2, 2011. Photo: omarroberthamilton/Flickr

From an Egyptian-Canadian student: "My mother, Mariam, is a medical doctor in Egypt. She was in Tahrir today -- Thursday, Feb. 3 -- treating people who had been wounded in yesterday's vicious attacks. She wanted me to share this information with as many people as possible."

Mariam's account:

"Despite what happened yesterday, the mood in Tahrir is still uplifting and encouraging. These people were attacked yesterday by paid thugs bearing ‘white weapons' (knives, daggers, swords). Against these attacks, they defended themselves with only their bare hands and literally the ground beneath their feet -- pulling up the pavement to throw at their attackers.

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Falling Arab dictatorships and Israeli government panic

The walls are crumbling. The walls behind which dictators indulge in decadent opulence while "their" people are mired in wretched circumstance. The walls behind which "leaders" secretly sell -- for personal gain -- the rights of the people they claim to represent.

Across North Africa and the Middle East, across the Arab world, for decades dictatorship and deepening corruption, firmly supported by imperial powers, seemed beyond challenge. Today, once "stable" regimes are now facing a popular reckoning.

From the vantage point of Palestine, there are three new dynamics.

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Egypt: Days of Anger in the Age of Terror

Montreal protest in support of Egypt, Jan. 28, 2011. Photo: Sarah Ghabrial

On Friday afternoon, starting around 2 p.m., 175 people gathered in front of the Egyptian consulate in Montreal to show their solidarity with the Egyptian protesters who have been calling since Tuesday for the end of Hosni Mubarak's regime.

Montreal supporters chanted for three hours in French, Arabic, and English, calling for an end to rampant poverty, police brutality, torture, corruption, economic stagnation, and dictatorship. "The youth want liberty and dignity!" they cried. "Down with Mubarak and all dictators!" Their signs and banners showed solidarity with the Tunisian movement that was seen to have sparked the protests in Egypt.

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Egypt spurns foreign NGOs

Photo: flickr/Rami Raoof

In early August, Egypt made international headlines once again for excluding its critics when a Human Rights Watch (HRW) delegation was denied entry into the country.

HRW's executive director, Kenneth Roth, and Middle East and North Africa director, Sarah Leah Whitson arrived in Cairo on August 10 to attend a press conference where they were to present a report on the group's year-long investigation into the mass killings during the Raba'a dispersal in August of last year. The pair were held in the Cairo airport for 12 hours and then deported. It was the first time that HRW has ever been denied entry into the country.

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Egypt: People Rights Vs Military Dictatorship

Friday, August 22, 2014 - 2:45pm

Location

University of Ottawa, Lamoureux Building RM 121 Ottawa, ON
Canada
45° 25' 17.508" N, 75° 41' 49.8948" W

Egypt: People Rights Vs Military Dictatorship: What Arab spring brought to Egypt? Is it Democracy or Military Coup?

The ECCD conference at the People’ Social Forum
Ottawa from Aug 22 2014.
www.peoplessocialforum.org/
Speakers:
- Roger Annis (journalist)
- José Del Pozo (prof of Latin America History UQAM)
- Mohamed Kamel (ECCD)

Facebook Event

Egypt must release journalists and protect freedom of expression

The three journalists – Australian Peter Greste, Canadian-Egyptian Mohamed Fahmy and Egyptian Baher Mohamed, all considered by Amnesty International to be prisoners of conscience – were sentenced to seven years in jail. Baher Mohamed received a further three years on a separate charge of possessing a bullet shell. They have been detained since 29 December 2013.

Their crime? Reporting the news and challenging the “official version” presented by the authorities. Amnesty International believes they are prisoners of conscience detained solely for peacefully exercising their right to freedom of expression.

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