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Image: Flickr/Premier of Ontario Photography
| May 11, 2016

From exploited to supported: Phasing out Canada's lowest wage work programs

Photo: flickr/· · · — — — · · ·

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Ontario service organization Community Living Algoma officially ended its sheltered workshop program in September.

The Sault Ste. Marie group, headed by executive director John Policicchio, began operating the program in the 1960s. 

"By the early 1990s there was somewhere close to 130 people who attended the sheltered workshop," Policicchio said.   

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'It's been a real struggle': Workers across Canada fight for $15 and fairness

Amber Slegtenhorst stands out in black while rallying for workers' rights. Suppl

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Workers across Canada fighting for better job conditions take to the streets today for the annual Fight for $15 and Fairness day of action.

rabble labour reporter Teuila Fuatai speaks to those at the heart of the campaign.

 

Acsana Fernando, 35, Group home worker, Scarborough, Ontario

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Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Redeye

CBSA conducting raids on caregivers in B.C. and Yukon

March 16, 2016
| Project Guardian is a Canada Border Services Agency project targeting foreign caregivers in their employers' homes. Advocates say workers are being penalized for leaving exploitative workplaces.
Length: 14:00 minutes (12.82 MB)
| March 8, 2016
December 18, 2015 |
Too many workers in Canada don't have permanent, full-time employment that provides a decent living.
Photo: flickr/ Kat Northern Lights Man
| December 1, 2015
Redeye

Black Lives Matter - Toronto

October 14, 2015
| The Black Lives Matter movement started in the U.S. in 2012. In the past three years, it’s become a global movement. Pascale Diverlus is co-founder of the Toronto chapter.
Length: 11:56 minutes (10.93 MB)

Does LIP Really Respect Immigrants & What Actually is Needed to be Done for Immigrants?

 

 

 

Does LIP Really Respect Immigrants & What is Actually Needed to be

Done for Immigrants?

 

 

The following is a very critical article about the Guelph-Wellington Local Immigration Partnership (LIP), which explains how this organization misuses most of the money that it obtained from the federal government to support immigrants, by diverting it to help educate employers and service providers that discriminate or likely to discriminate immigrants.

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Demographic shift shows changes in Canada's job market

In the age of globalization, with a shrinking manufacturing industry, teachers, nurses and civil servants are the new faces of labour.

Related rabble.ca story:

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