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Photo: ashley.adcox/flickr
| June 16, 2015
| June 14, 2015
Image: Flickr/EnvironmentalDefence
| June 12, 2015
| December 19, 2014

Can a First Nations-led movement stop Big Oil?

Photo: Paulina Otylia

Can a First Nations-led, people-driven movement really have the power to stop Big Oil?

The folks behind the Pull Together campaign think so. The Pull Together initiative supports First Nations in B.C. who are taking to the courts to stop Enbridge's Northern Gateway project.

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From Exxon Valdez to Kinder Morgan: Pipelines won't pay for oil spills

Photo: flickr/ARLIS Reference

"Once the oil leaves the dock, Kinder Morgan holds no obligation or responsibility, even ten metres out -- that's the carrier's liability."

At the last two information events in Chilliwack, Kinder Morgan brought a large team of professionals and specialized aids to cover an exhaustive range of issues. Resembling a Royal Commission, everything concerning the proposed pipeline was in the tow of a Subject Matter Expert and neatly secured in a rolling briefcase. The first audience was the full Board of the Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD) and the second, an invited group of government regulatory officials, community leaders and representatives of major environmental organizations. Audiences with a formidable amount of assembled oversight.

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Despite NEB approval of Line 9, opposition continues

Photo: Dave Vasey

The Line 9 campaign in Southern Ontario has been a movement that has used civil disobedience, education, and grassroots organizing to oppose tar sands expansion. On March 6, 2014 the National Energy Board approved the Line 9B Reversal project by Enbridge. By this December, Enbridge plans to have Line 9 flow up to 300,000 barrels per day of Bakken shale oil and tar sands crude from Sarnia to Montreal. The line runs in close proximity to over 9.1 million people including 99 cities/towns, and 18 First Nation communities.

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GroundWire

GroundWire | August 18, 2014: pipelines, prisoners' justice and more

August 19, 2014
| This is a special bilingual episode of GroundWire in English and French.
Length: 29:55 minutes (41.1 MB)

Oil not welcome in the Tsleil-Waututh Nation's ancestral waters

Like a real-life game of Risk, the threat of pipelines stood manifest in the huge green petroleum holding tanks perched on the south side of Burrard Inlet, B.C., dwarfing three canoes carrying Tsleil-Waututh First Nations and other anti-pipeline allies Sunday afternoon. 

Paddlers performed a ceremony at the third annual Salish Sea Summer Gathering to show that oil, in particular, the twinning of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain Pipeline that would subject B.C. waters to an estimated 400 tankers per year, is not welcome in the Tsleil-Waututh Nation's ancestral waters.

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Save the Salish Sea: Celebrating the growing culture of resistance

Creating a vibrant community of widespread resistance begins in your own backyard. Or more accurately, on the unceded Indigenous territory that we in Vancouver reside. 

Organized by the Tsleil-Waututh Nation Sacred Trust, the Third Annual Save the Salish Sea Summer Gathering at Cates Park/Whey-ah-Wichen, Sunday Aug 10, set out to demonstrate a legacy of activist culture, in preparation for a continued fight ahead against further oil and gas development and the frontline communities most affected by it.

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