Energy ConservationSyndicate content

WINGS

Women leading energy innovation inside the U.S. government

January 9, 2017
| The U.S. military is the world's biggest consumer of energy, and Katherine Hammack has spent six years working to make it more energy-efficient.
Length: 29:09 minutes (40.03 MB)
Columnists

Choosing a green future: Notes from the renewables transition

Solar Farm, Brockville Ontario. Photo: Jonathan Potts/flickr

rabble is expanding our Parliamentary Bureau and we need your help! Support us on Patreon today!

Keep Karl on Parl

With solar panels going up our roof on an unseasonably warm December day, and world leaders at the Paris climate summit, it seems appropriate to make a few observations about the transition to a 100 per cent renewable world.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Columnists

Nova Scotia sparks hope for a better energy policy

Photo: Property#1/flickr

rabble is expanding our Parliamentary Bureau and we need your help! Support us on Patreon today!

Keep Karl on Parl

Having watched the electricity spectacle in Nova Scotia since the early 1970s, my expectations have taken a hit over time. Whereas I once naively believed that, surely, reason would prevail, recently I've been inclined to consider it progress if a government -- any government -- can serve its four years without leaving behind yet another white elephant or equivalent bung-up.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Columnists

Future of Nova Scotia's energy efficiency is on the line

Photo: Maëlick/flickr

The future of Nova Scotia's quest for energy efficiency, its status as Canada's leading jurisdiction in that regard, and the wisdom of the Liberal government on energy matters will be on trial before the Utilities and Review Board this coming week, as the board deals with a demand by Nova Scotia Power Inc. to slash efficiency programs by nearly half.

You'll remember that Efficiency Nova Scotia, an independent, non-profit energy conservation utility, was funded by a charge on your power bill, which aggravated many.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Photo: Doug Wallick/flickr
| April 7, 2015
Photo: Axel Bruns/flickr
| December 9, 2014
Columnists

Five things we can do with cheap oil

Photo: Josh Sullivan/flickr

At a recent meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), some member nations argued for limits on oil production. They wanted to boost the sagging global oil price and increase revenues for their national treasuries. But in the end, led by Saudi Arabia, OPEC did not act.

With the U.S. boom in shale gas, and Canada's frenzied tar sands development, it is likely that oil supply will remain high and prices will remain low for the immediate future.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Columnists

A modest proposal to fill Nova Scotia's energy efficiency void

Photo: bonedad/flickr

It's a brutal winter for power rates and oil bills. Wherever I go, people are fretting about what to do. Small electric heaters to heat one room at a time are flying off the shelves. Some are putting in heat pumps, some are insulating at the behest of Efficiency Nova Scotia (ENS), but most are overwhelmed and confused.

They don't know what solutions are out there, where to look, how much they cost, how effective they are, who can install them and so on. And they don't know whom to ask. Some even write in and ask me.

As it turns out, there are plenty of options out there, and potentially a big demand, but no system to deliver them.

Here's my modest proposal to government: a plan to fill that void.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Columnists

Cities take meaningful climate action as nations lag

David Cadman. Photo: Dave Cournoyer/flickr

Canada and every other rich country need to crash their CO2 emissions 10 per cent per year starting in 2014 to have any hopes of ensuring a not-super-dangerous climate for our grandchildren, said Kevin Anderson of Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of Manchester.

"We can still do 2C but not the way we're going," Anderson said on the sidelines of the UN climate talks, in Warsaw, Poland.

Anderson wasn't just referring to the lengthy-and-acronym-laden COP 19 process held inside Warsaw's 58,000-seat soccer stadium. It's too late for any normal approaches to emissions reductions. Preventing climate disaster requires a radical measures and our economic system is not up to the task he said.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Columnists

Bringing conservation into the main energy debate in Nova Scotia

Photo: Property#1/flickr

Nova Scotia is now the national leader in cutting energy waste, thanks largely to Efficiency Nova Scotia, an innovative arm's-length conservation utility financed by a charge on power bills, according to two national experts who reported in the Chronicle Herald on Wednesday.

This is great, obviously. But it's still not enough. I've said this before and raised some hackles, as ENS is to some degree a political football (the Liberals, playing small politics, want its funding off the power bills), so let me elaborate.

Conservation is not part of the main energy debate in this province, which is: if not the Maritime Link, then what? More power from natural gas generation, more wind farms, more imports from elsewhere, maybe tidal power, biomass and whatnot.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.
Syndicate content