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Redeye

Canadian family policies stuck in the past

February 23, 2015
| Today's families need child care, parental leave for dads and tax measures that help lower earners -- not income-splitting -- according to the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
Length: 14:15 minutes (13.06 MB)
Biological clock cartoon
| February 16, 2015
Columnists

Politics doesn't stand a chance in the Ford family psychodrama

Photo: AshtonPal/flickr

Here's what I find unforgivable about the Fords; it took till now to figure it out. It's not their right-wing politics. There's lots of that around. It's not the bullying, bullies can be dealt with. Nor their huge ambition and sense of political entitlement. It's not Rob's moral foibles or unsavoury social life or his crassness.

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'A Family by Any Other Name' explores queer relationships

A Family by Any Other Name

by Edited by Bruce Gillespie
(TouchWood Editions,
2014;
$19.95)

What does "family" mean to you? The new anthology, A Family by Any Other Name, asks this question and focuses on the perspectives of queer relationships and families. These personal essays discuss stories on coming out, same-sex marriage, adopting, having biological kids, polyamorous relationships, families without kids, divorce and dealing with the death of a spouse, as well as essays by straight writers about having a gay parent or child. 

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Ten progressive movie picks for the holidays

Photo: flickr William Hook

You can change the arts and culture conversation. Chip in to rabble's donation drive today! 

Over the holidays, there’s nothing quite like cozying up with a special someone, or a couple of friends, to watch a flick on the big or medium screen; or if you’re like my family, crowded around the laptop. (No, we didn’t join the Black Friday mobs battling for a TV this year -- we’re making do!)

Regardless of how we consume film, rabble rousers want more than the typical Hollywood fare, right?  

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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| April 26, 2013
Columnists

Emerging forms of family open new chapter in human development

Photo: Valerie Reneé/Flickr

In a recent column I responded to David Brooks' pessimistic analysis concerning the decline of the nuclear family. Brooks argued that we live in an "age of possibility" in which the endless choices offered to individuals discourage them from making broader commitments to family, craft and God. The lack of obligation to family was in Brooks' view dangerous for the development of the individual and of society.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Columnists

The decline of the American family

Photo: Christian Collins/Flickr

In a recent column in the New York Times, "The Age of Possibility," the intelligent conservative David Brooks reflected on the social problems created by the slow death, catalyzed by individualism, of the traditional nuclear family. The column is typically riven with mistaken assumptions yet makes an important overall point.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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Redeye

Movie: A Separation

May 12, 2012
| Asghar Farhadi directs this award-winning drama about a woman who wants a divorce from her husband so she can leave Iran with the couple's child.
Length: 13:48
Watch me: movie reviews with Cathi Bond

Movie review: Aftershock

November 11, 2011
| Don't miss Aftershock, a riveting political flick about a family rebuilding after the Tangshan Quake in 1976.
Length: 03:48 minutes (2.66 MB)
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