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| January 11, 2017
Columnists

Protecting Eastern hemlock, our next endangered tree species

Photo: Joshua Mayer/flickr

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In spring and summer 2002, entomologists first collected a small, bright green beetle from ash trees in the Windsor-Detroit area. None had ever seen this insect before. Two months passed before a taxonomist in Slovakia identified it as Agrilus planipennis, an Asian member of the family Buprestidae. This family has about 15,000 species, with brightly coloured adults ("jewel beetles") and larvae that bore through stems, leaves, roots and logs.

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Redeye

Provincial government policies making B.C.'s forests more vulnerable to fire

September 20, 2015
| Drought and high summer temperatures have led to one of the worst forest fire seasons in recent years. Jens Wieting says that the B.C. government isn't taking climate change seriously.
Length: 13:26 minutes (12.3 MB)
Columnists

Canada is now the world's leading 'deforestation nation'

Photo: Crustmania/ CC by 2.0

UXBRIDGE, Canada (IPS) - The world's last remaining forest wilderness is rapidly being lost -- and much of this is taking place in Canada, not in Brazil or Indonesia where deforestation has so far made the headlines.

A new satellite study reveals that since 2000 more than 104 million hectares of forests -- an area three times the size of Germany -- have been destroyed or degraded.

 "Every four seconds, an area of the size of a football (soccer) field is lost," said Christoph Thies of Greenpeace International.

The extent of this forest loss, which is clearly visible in satellite images taken in 2000 and 2013, is "absolutely appalling" and has a global impact, Thies told IPS, because forests play a crucial in regulating the climate.

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Photo: Mongabay.com
| January 8, 2013

Our limited forests of infinite value

It is a pretty well accepted truth that "He who ignores history is doomed to repeat it."

Commenting on the economic trends in Italy, where he was American ambassador, George Perkins Marsh wrote something in 1864 that would be current and accurate if it was printed in a major newspaper today:

"Even now we are breaking up the floor and wainscoting and doors and window frames of our dwelling for fuel to seethe our pottage."

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| December 17, 2010
Youth Delegation to the UN Conference on Climate Change

Canadian Youth Delegation daily podcast from COP16-#5

December 3, 2010
| Welcome to our fifth podcast, coming to you from Klimaforum, where hundreds of youth have gathered to celebrate Young and Future Generations day.
Length: 07:07 minutes (6.53 MB)
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