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Haida Gwaii at dawn

Haida Gwaii's Masset Inlet at dawn. (Photo: Jason Addy / flickr)
After generations of struggle to preserve their islands, the people of Haida Gwaii are determined to steer their own future.

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Made on Haida Gwaii: How dancing at the 2010 Olympics catalyzed entrepreneurial vision

Erica Ryan-Gagne displays Eri-Cut & Nailed signage outside of her new salon loca
Winning double gold medals in hockey was a prominent memory from the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. But Erica Ryan-Gagne remembers the Olympics differently than most Canadians.

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Made on Haida Gwaii: Filmmaker and youth worker Kiefer Collison

Today we resume our 'Made on Haida Gwaii' series, highlighting the accomplishments of young people who call the islands on the Pacific coast home. On Saturday, Haida Gwaii was rocked by a 7.7 magnitude earthquake, the strongest registered in Canada in over half a century. Fortunately, there were no fatalities or major injuries reported. 

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Made on Haida Gwaii: Evan Putterill leads with passion for environmental issues

Evan Putterill speaks at the legislature in Victoria as part of a celebration of the Haida Gwaii Reconciliation Act.

This is the second installment of the 'Made on Haida Gwaii' feature series, by writer April Diamond Dutheil. Each week we showcase the story of a talented young person who calls Haida Gwaii home. In this vast country, our major urban centres tend to soak up most of the attention. This collection of success stories, about young people living on these beautiful but remote islands off the Pacific coast, aims to disrupt the dominant myths of what it means to grow up in Canada’s North.

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Made on Haida Gwaii: Dana Bellis brings new energy from the North

Dana Bellis in Rouen, France, July 2010.

Today we introduce a new feature series: 'Made on Haida Gwaii,' by writer April Diamond Dutheil. Each week we will showcase the story of a talented young person who calls Haida Gwaii home. In this vast country, our major urban centres tend to soak up most of the attention. This collection of success stories, about young people living on these beautiful but remote islands off the Pacific coast, aims to disrupt the dominant myths of what it means to grow up in Canada’s North.

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Welcome to Haida High

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It's a sunny June 1 morning in Yan, an ancient Haida village on the northeast coast of the island of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia. Once home to two different Haida clans, all that's left of the village is a re-created Haida building, a few decaying totem poles, and the skulls of the people that died there lying just beyond the tree line. Abandoned by the Haida in the late 19th century, today the seaside site is crawling with teenagers.

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