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Egypt's new dictatorship model for the digital age

Photo: flickr/Ted Eytan

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Egypt was ruled by the Mubarak dictatorship for 30 years before the people managed to overthrow him in 2011.

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Mass protests grow as military elite take Egypt back to dictatorship

Photo: flickr/Ted Eytan

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The military-dominated regime that seized power in Egypt in July 2013 has escalated its attacks on freedom and democracy in the country. A series of pronouncements were issued in late December, including the banning of the country's largest political movement -- the Muslim Brotherhood. By all evidence, Egypt's economic and military elite are taking the country back to the darkest days of the rule of former dictator Hosni Mubarak or even farther into the abyss.

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Wael Ghonim on the social media spark that lit Egypt's revolutionary fire

Revolution 2.0: The Power of the People Is Greater Than the People in Power: A Memoir

by Wael Ghonim
(Mariner Books,
2012;
$18.95)

Reading Revolution 2.0 against the backdrop of the current unrest in Egypt, one can’t help but feel nostalgic.

After all, this book is an ode to the belief that people have the power to choose their political, social, and economic destinies -- at least if they unite in their struggle for justice.

And for all of us, it indeed seemed possible as we watched the Egyptian revolution unfold, when citizens who had up until been “unengaged,” “cautious” and “intimidated” finally broke through the barrier of fear. Who can forget those staggering scenes in Cairo’s Tahrir square full of millions of hopeful, demanding, persistent demonstrators finally finding their voice?

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Lawrence Cannon
| May 11, 2012
Redeye

Role of social media in Egyptian uprising

April 13, 2011
| Redeye speaks with media scholar Adel Iskandar about the part that Facebook and other social media did -- and did not -- play in the ouster of Hosni Mubarak.
Length: 16:28

Toronto celebrates Egypt's victory

After 18 days of a popular uprising led to the overthrow of Egypt's dictator Hosni Mubarak on Friday, Feb. 11, 2011, Toronto's Egyptian community and Torontonians of all backgrounds came out to celebrate at Dundas Square with hugs, chants, songs, drumming and dancing.



The celebrations were organized by the Toronto-Arab Solidarity Campaign. The campaign consists of a city-wide network in the Greater Toronto Area that supports the growing movements for freedom and democracy throughout the Arab world. It includes both Arab and non-Arab members, and organizations such as the Canadian Coptic Association, the Egyptian National Association for Change, the Canadian Arab Federation, the Canadian Peace Alliance, and the Toronto Coalition to Stop the War.

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My lifetime of waiting for this Egyptian moment

It is hard to find words to describe the sense of immense, almost otherworldly joy that has enraptured Egyptians here in Canada who witnessed the miracle that unfolded over the course of the Egyptian revolution, and came to ecstatic fruition Friday evening. Over those 18 days, as we watched minute by minute, hour by hour, as the Egypt that we and our parents left behind shook off the debris of the Mubarak dictatorship to re-emerge with its eyes open, determined, proud, joyous.

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Interview: The role of youth in Tahrir Square protests

Mona, a University of Cairo student and activist, discusses the role of youth activists in the Tahrir Square protests.

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Columnists

Egypt's youth driving the revolution

"In memoriam, Christoph Probst, Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl" reads the banner at the top of Kareem Amer's popular Egyptian dissident blog. "Beheaded on Feb. 22, 1943, for daring to say no to Hitler, and yes to freedom and justice for all." The young blogger's banner recalls the courageous group of anti-Nazi pamphleteers who called themselves the White Rose Collective. They secretly produced and distributed six pamphlets denouncing Nazi atrocities, proclaiming, in one, "We will not be silent." Sophie and her brother Hans Scholl were captured by the Nazis, tried, convicted and beheaded.

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February 7, 2011 |
CUPE National President Paul Moist has written Prime Minister Stephen Harper to condemn the Canadian government’s failure to fully support democratic change in Egypt.
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