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Dakota Access Pipeline Company attacks Indigenous protesters with dogs and pepper spray

On September 3, Democracy Now! reported the Dakota Access pipeline company attacked Indigenous activists with dogs and pepper spray as they protested against the $3.8-billion pipeline's construction. If completed, the pipeline would carry about 500,000 barrels of crude per day from North Dakota’s Bakken oilfield to Illinois. The project has faced months of resistance from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and members of nearly 100 more tribes from across the U.S. and Canada.

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Standing Rock oil pipeline protest: The largest gathering of Indigenous peoples in a century

From the Real News Network: It's being called the largest gathering of Native Americans in a century. This week, eight were arrested in North Dakota, along with 30 in Iowa, trying to halt the construction of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline. This is part of a growing indigenous-led movement to stop the pipeline, which will span four states and carry half a million barrels of crude oil. Supporters say it will bring jobs and clean energy, but critics say it endangers drinking water and sites sacred to the Standing Rock Sioux, and potentially millions of others, in a filed lawsuit in federal court. 

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| July 15, 2016
| July 12, 2016

What is the impact of the extractive oil industry on our health?

In 2014, Women’s Earth Alliance (WEA) and Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN) began a multi-year initiative to document the ways that the sexual and reproductive health of Indigenous women, Two Spirit and young people in North America are impacted by extractive industries. Land Body Defense aims to support their leadership in resisting environmental violence in their communities.

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Did you read the Truth and Reconcilliation report?

Duncan, B.C.-based writer Jennifer Manuel created an online campaign asking Canadians to pledge to read the entire 380-page document. Manuel calls it The TRC Reading Challenge. When she began in April, she hoped to have just 1,000 people sign on, but over 3,000 have already done so.  Read the report and then let's support the TRC's demands for change. 

Read the entire article by Dennis Gruending

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Redeye

New data reveals depth of poverty on reserve

June 13, 2016
| A new study using data from the National Household Survey shows 60% of Indigenous children on reserve live below the poverty line. We speak with Mary Teegee of the BC Aboriginal Child Care Society.
Length: 16:26 minutes (15.05 MB)
| June 13, 2016

Avi Lewis speaks in support of Grassy Narrows

Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming.

Almost half a century ago, a pulp and paper company dumped tons of mercury into the English Wabigoon River system in Northwestern Ontario.

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| May 30, 2016
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