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Flickr/Peg Hunter
| November 7, 2016
Image: Flickr/jmiller291
| October 26, 2016

Chippewas of the Thames take Line 9 to court

Supreme Court of Canada. Flickr/Mike Alexander

Myeengun Henry is from the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation and is an elected band council member with the health portfolio. He is manager of Aboriginal Services at Conestoga College, where he teaches a Native Studies course. He also teaches about traditional medicine at McMaster University. Henry is among a group of people who are presenting a constitutional challenge to the Supreme Court of Canada on the basis that Enbridge's Line 9, which runs through their traditional territory, does not meet the criteria for proper consultation with affected First Nations.

I understand that the Supreme Court case is to be heard on Nov. 30.

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Drum dancer, Allyson Gear, stops a bus load of construction workers.
| October 21, 2016

'Indigenous London' re-imagines colonial telling of London's past

When thinking of places to research North American Indigenous history, London, England may not immediately spring to mind.

But that's exactly what Coll Thrush, a University of British Columbia professor, examines in his latest book, Indigenous London.

The Crown's fraught relationship with Indigenous peoples from Canada, the United States, New Zealand and Australia has left its marks on the British capital. The book, to be released later this month, re-frames London's history through an Indigenous lens. It's punctuated with walking tours of the city and Thrush's own poetry.

"Even if the city has forgotten its imperial past, Indigenous people haven't," Thrush told rabble.ca

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Flickr/emmaatlarge
| October 19, 2016

Documenting the lack of services available to Indigenous children: An Interview with film director Alanis Obomsawin

Photo Vancouver International  Film Festival
Obomsawin's documentry, featured at the Vancouver International Film Festival, highlights the lack of services for Indigenous children living on reserves.

Related rabble.ca story:

Talking Radical Radio

Grassroots Indigenous organizing against the Site C dam

October 12, 2016
| Helen Knott talks about the grassroots opposition among Indigenous people to the proposed Site C dam.
Length: 28:22 minutes (25.98 MB)

'We Can't Make the Same Mistake Twice': Interview with director Alanis Obomsawin

Photo: Vancouver International Film Festival

In 2007, the Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations filed a complaint against Indian Affairs and Northern Development Canada. They argued that services provided to First Nations children on reserves were inferior to those offered to other Canadian children.

In her documentary We Can't Make the Same Mistake Twice -- featured at the Vancouver International Film Festival -- Alanis Obomsawin documents the court challenge and gives voice to the childcare workers involved.

rabble.ca spoke with Obomsawin to learn more about her documentary and the hopes she has for Canada.

Why did you want to make this film?

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1,500 pairs of shoes commemorate missing and murdered Indigenous women

The 12th annual Calgary Sisters in Spirit vigil drew about 500 participants to a mid-day mid-week march and demonstration downtown.

Related rabble.ca story:

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