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The push for new pipelines in the name of 'nation building' continues to tear us apart

Photo: taylorandayumi/flickr
This dependence on commodities continues to shape Canada's body politic -- and for our new government, it will continue to confound attempts to heal relations with First Nations.

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Unrestrained resource extraction isn't ancient history -- it's a crime still in progress

Tar Sands Healing Walk. Photo: taylorandayumi/flickr

It has been one year and one week since a coalition of dozens of organizations and artists launched The Leap Manifesto, a short vision statement about how to transition to a post-carbon economy while battling social and economic injustice.

A lot has changed: a new federal government, a new international reputation, a new tone around First Nations and the environment. But when it comes to concrete action on lowering emissions and respecting land rights, much remains the same.

Our new government has adopted the utterly inadequate targets of the last government. Alberta has a climate plan that would allow tar sands emissions to increase by 43 per cent, wholly incompatible with the goals of the Paris climate agreement.

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Fifth annual Downtown Eastside powwow shifts focus to future generations

Regalia-clad dancers and a "we support Standing Rock" banner filled Vancouver's Oppenheimer Park Sunday for the fifth annual Downtown Eastside powwow on Sunday.

The focus of the celebration shifted this year from elders to children, a move that's not only part of a four-year cycle of change but also symbolizes looking to the future.

"We're big supporters of Standing Rock. I think it ties in so nicely with the powwow because that's what they're standing up for -- it's the future generations," said Patrick Smith with Culture Saves Lives.

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Columnists

Indigenous land defenders face down bulldozers to block Dakota Access pipeline

Photo by UnicornRiot.Ninja via Prachatai/flickr

The Missouri River, the longest river in North America, has for thousands of years provided the water necessary for life to the region's original inhabitants. To this day, millions of people rely on the Missouri for clean drinking water. Now, a petroleum pipeline, called the Dakota Access pipeline, is being built, threatening the river. A movement has grown to block the pipeline, led by Native American tribes that have lived along the banks of the Missouri from time immemorial. Members of the Dakota and Lakota nations from the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation established a camp at the confluence of the Missouri and Cannonball rivers, about 50 miles south of Bismarck, North Dakota.

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Salmon or LNG? What's at stake in the Pacific Northwest decision

Photo: Province of British Columbia/flickr

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"The undersigned First Nation leaders and citizens of the Nine Allied Tribes of Lax Kw'alaams hereby declare that Lelu Island, and Flora and Agnew Banks, are hereby protected for all time, as a refuge for wild salmon and marine resources, and are to be held in trust for all future generations."

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| March 15, 2016
| March 14, 2016
Image: Council of Canadians blog
| February 10, 2016

Watch: Pamela Palmater on taking back Canada

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Glen Coulthard introduces Pamela Palmater for this discussion on taking back Canada from the irreparable harm will done to the environment, the economy, and the basic democratic and human rights of Canadians.

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| May 14, 2015
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