John A. MacdonaldSyndicate content

Tim Hudak
| June 18, 2014

Indigenous resistance in the face of Canadian colonialsim

Photo: flickr/Razer1953
Author James Daschuk discusses Canada's history of disease, deliberate starvation, ethnic cleansing, tar sands expansion, neglect of treaties and a legacy of colonialism of First Nations.

Related rabble.ca story:

'Clearing the Plains' confronts Canada's colonialism

Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life

by James Daschuk
(University of Regina Press,
2013;
$39.95)

Official bicentennial celebrations of the "affable drunk" who founded Canada will likely mask John A. Macdonald's history of racism and deliberate starvation of First Nations, and similar policies continue today with the tar sands and fracking expansion.

James Daschuk, author of Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life, addresses Canada's history of disease, deliberate starvation, ethnic cleansing, tar sands expansion, neglect of treaties and a legacy of colonialism that continues today.

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| July 17, 2012

Nation Maker, Sir John A. Macdonald: His Life, Our Times: A reading and signing by Richard J. Gwyn

Monday, January 16, 2012 - 7:30pm

Location

McNally Robinson Booksellers Saskatoon
3130 8th Street East 8th Street at Circle Drive
Saskatoon, SK S7H 0W2
Canada
52° 6' 52.7076" N, 106° 36' 18.8316" W

McNally Robinson Independent Bookstores holds a reading and signing of Richard J. Gwyn's Nation Maker, Sir John A. Macdonald: His Life, Our Times, the second volume of the bestselling, award-winning John A: The Man who Made Us.

John A. Macdonald, Canada's first and most important prime minister, is the man who made Confederation happen, who built this country over the next quarter century, and who shaped what it is today. From Confederation Day in 1867, where this volume picks up, Macdonald finessed a reluctant union of four provinces in central and eastern Canada into a strong nation, despite indifference from Britain and annexationist sentiment in the United States.

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