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Save the Salish Sea: Respecting Indigenous rights means stopping tar sands tankers

I am, like most of you, a strong supporter of First Nations land and title rights. Increasingly, the international community is waking up to the rights of Indigenous people and their justified desire for sovereignty and self-determination.

This struggle is playing itself out very publicly as First Nations on the west coast of Canada have drawn a line in the sand regarding dangerous pipeline projects. That is the context for the canoe gathering this weekend in the Vancouver harbour, organized by the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and the the Squamish Nation. 

Protecting the waters is a sacred trust

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Cancun might be a flop, but our environment plans can flourish

The UN climate change negotiations wind to a close today in Cancun, but the hot air has long since gone out the room. This time around, nobody really expected a meaningful new climate treaty to be signed. And yet the urgent task of dealing with climate change remains.

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| December 11, 2014

Burnaby Mountain, Kinder Morgan and the law

Photo: flickr/Mark Klotz
It felt like a victory, and it was, but a week later the wages of victory are hard to grasp. A lawyer looks back on her work with the protesters of Burnaby Mountain.

Related rabble.ca story:

Whose contempt? Burnaby Mountain, Kinder Morgan and the law

Photo: flickr/Mark Klotz

Burnaby Mountain, probably best known as the home of Simon Fraser University, is the site of a proposed expansion of Trans Mountain, Kinder Morgan's Edmonton to Vancouver tar sands pipeline. The mountain is also unceded Indigenous territory, part of the traditional land of the Musqueum, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. But for the last few months, Burnaby Mountain played host to a concerted struggle for climate justice and Indigenous sovereignty, a battle over one pipeline that became a proxy fight over the Harper government's fixation with extractive industry as a whole.

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Image: Flickr/Dhollister
| December 3, 2014
Photo: Mark Klotz/flickr
| December 3, 2014

Capitalism vs. The Climate: Who will win?

This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate

by Naomi Klein
(Penguin Random House,
2014;
$36.95)

On Burnaby Mountain, while oil company Kinder Morgan works to lay a pipeline, growing numbers of people have been standing and resisting since September 3.

Indigenous land defenders and settler allies point out that these are still unceded Indigenous lands. Occupying them to establish the Trans Mountain pipeline, transporting crude oil and refined products from Edmonton to Burnaby, would also bring 890,000 barrels of tar sands oil every day. This at a time when nearly every day another report reveals that our climate is more susceptible to carbon dioxide than we realized, and that we should be keeping it all in the ground to stand anywhere near a chance.

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Redeye

Victory on Burnaby Mountain

November 30, 2014
| On Thursday, Judge Austin Cullen turned down Kinder Morgan's application to extend its injunction and threw out the contempt charges against more than 100 people arrested at the drill site.
Length: 14:34 minutes (13.35 MB)
rabble.ca polls

What has been the biggest success of the Burnaby Mountain protests?

The Burnaby Mountain protests against the Kinder Morgan pipelines have continued throughout the week.

What do you think has been the biggest success of the Burnaby Mountain protests?

Choices

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