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Not Rex: Adios Aveos

Photo: Not Rex
Employees of Aveos were left holding the bag after the company shut down last week.

Related rabble.ca story:

CUPW: A cautionary tale of union-busting, with a little help from the media

With 16 straight years of profitability, including record profits in 2009 and postage rates lower than almost all other industrialized countries, the Canada Post negotiations should have been relatively easy. But it's Tory times in Canada and what better way is there for a right-wing government to attack the labour movement than by going after the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, a national and historically militant union?

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CUPW keeps its options open in strike negotiations

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Finance minister's office occupied by Ontario Federation of Labour president over private pensions scheme

WHITBY, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Dec. 17, 2010) -- Ontario Federation of Labour President Sid Ryan, unions and community members have just occupied Jim Flaherty's office, 701 Rossland Road East, Unit 204, Whitby, stunned by his last-minute betrayal of Canadians' retirement security.

On the eve of the Kananaskis provincial finance ministers' meeting, Flaherty has dumped the expansion of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and put all Canadians at the mercy of the banks, mutual fund and insurance industries.

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The hidden costs of Canada's banana market

Photo: Kevin Edmonds.

Murder. Paramilitary death squads. Exploitation. Torture. Child Labour. Toxic chemicals. At first these words are not readily linked to a soft, sweet and innocent fruit, a staple in the majority of our homes, but rather to the actions of a tyrant operating in a forgotten corner of the world.

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Columnists

Asbestos: Quebec labour's shame

It is too often the case that history highlights important developments that current affairs seem to miss. That unfortunately seems to be the case with what will certainly be recorded as one of the most shameful moral failures of the Quebec labour movement in its history. I am speaking of its blind support for the asbestos industry in that province, support that contradicts almost every important tenet of trade unionism. Asbestos kills more people
worldwide than any other industrial material by far. And that includes Quebec where 55 per cent of all worker fatalities in 2009 were caused by asbestos.

Columnists

Canada is a nation led by political managers, not leaders

Where are the leaders? It's a question I hear from people more and more.

People are looking for inspiration, hope, some sense that someone at least has some ideas of where the country should go -- not go this afternoon or tomorrow or next week but in the next 20 or 50 years.

Someone who is at least partly a visionary and not just a strategist and tactician. Canadians, I think, are desperately looking for someone who can demonstrate that they have done some serious and thoughtful thinking about what kind of country we want to build.

But political leadership of that kind seems to be a thing of the past. They don't make Tommy Douglases anymore or even Pierre Trudeaus. Why?

Governing as business

Ontario teachers divided on resuming extra-curricular duties

Teachers rally outside the Ontario Liberal convention. (Photo: hdurnin / flickr)

The union representing education workers in Ontario elementary schools said yesterday that despite "respectful and positive" talks with the government under newly-minted Premier Kathleen Wynne, it has no intention just yet of telling its members to end their boycott of extra-curricular activities.

 Since September, elementary school teachers have been protesting the government's passage of Bill 115 by declining to lead student clubs, sports teams or other extra-curricular activities.

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Columnists

R v. Cole and an employee's reasonable expectation of privacy

Technology has become central to the workplace, with employers regularly providing employees with access to computers and other devices for use in the course of work and employment activities. Personal use of these devices often becomes incidental, especially as the boundaries between the workplace and home blur. As a result, questions arise over who really owns the personal information generated on these workplace devices and the extent of an employee's privacy rights over any personal information stored on these devices.

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