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Migrant Matters

Power to the PINAYs: On the work of Montreal-based Filipino women’s organization Pinay

August 30, 2014
| Tapping into the current status of Canada's Live-in Caregiver Program and the work of Montreal-based organization PINAY, which is led by Filipinas, including women working as migrant workers.
Length: 37:36 minutes (34.43 MB)

What issues are most important to labour leaders this Ontario election?

With the Ontario election around the corner, we want to know what issues labour leaders are most concerned about!

Check out this video to hear what issues are affecting workers' rights.

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Shop talk: public speaking for organizers

Shop talk takes participants through the basics of effective public speaking

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) has created a great guide for facilitators about how to run a success workshop on public speaking for union activists. The guide includes handouts, a feedback form for participants to fill out, and charts to draw on during the workshop. The workshop covers:

Characteristics of an effective speaker

How to create an outline for a speech

Practice exercises

Mock presentations for participants to test their skills 

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Ontario teachers divided on resuming extra-curricular duties

Teachers rally outside the Ontario Liberal convention. (Photo: hdurnin / flickr)

The union representing education workers in Ontario elementary schools said yesterday that despite "respectful and positive" talks with the government under newly-minted Premier Kathleen Wynne, it has no intention just yet of telling its members to end their boycott of extra-curricular activities.

 Since September, elementary school teachers have been protesting the government's passage of Bill 115 by declining to lead student clubs, sports teams or other extra-curricular activities.

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Columnists

R v. Cole and an employee's reasonable expectation of privacy

Technology has become central to the workplace, with employers regularly providing employees with access to computers and other devices for use in the course of work and employment activities. Personal use of these devices often becomes incidental, especially as the boundaries between the workplace and home blur. As a result, questions arise over who really owns the personal information generated on these workplace devices and the extent of an employee's privacy rights over any personal information stored on these devices.

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Employees beware: The perils of posting on Facebook

The dramatic growth of social media use in Canada on such sites as Facebook has raised novel legal issues for employers and employees. One such issue is whether or not an employee's off-duty conduct online (i.e. posting personal status updates, photos or comments on Facebook at home) can get that employee fired. In short, the answer is yes.

Many Canadians still erroneously believe that what they post on their personal Facebook page is private. They feel little hesitation in coming home after a difficult day at work and griping publicly about their company, boss, co‑workers or quality of work. While it is important to protect freedom of expression and healthy discourse on labour relations issues, posting this type of content online may have serious consequences.

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Alberta Federation of Labour celebrates its 100th birthday

When we talk about the history of Alberta we usually think of wide-open prairies, cattle ranching and oil -- seldom do historians talk about the men and women of the labour movement who helped Alberta grow and become prosperous. As part of this year's birthday celebrations, the Alberta Federation of Labour (AFL) is helping Albertans learn about the province's rich labour history. The Alberta Federation of Labour was born on June 14, 1912.

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Photo: TheCulinaryGeek/Flickr
| July 20, 2012
| June 14, 2012
Columnists

Temporary foreign workers and the labour market

Employment: Canadian and Temporary Foreign Workers 2007-2011

Further to recent commentary regarding the Harper government's dramatic expansion of the Temporary Foreign Worker (TWF) program, consider this shocking factoid.

Even before the expansion of the program envisioned in the current omnibus "budget" bill, temporary foreign workers (who do not have the same rights as other Canadian workers, and whose presence here depends entirely on keeping their employers happy) already accounted for almost 30 per cent of all net new paid jobs created in Canada between 2007 and 2011.

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