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| October 21, 2014
face2face

Frank Soriano on the dark side of management and 'other' awareness

August 20, 2014
| Today I chat with leadership expert Frank Soriano who talks about the dark side of management, silver bullets, "other" awareness, and how what we believe is indeed connected to how we think.
Length: 42:45 minutes (48.93 MB)
Columnists

Marois, Moses and the law of leadership

Photo: Parti Québécois/flickr

People of the Jewish faith around the world are observing Passover, the religious holiday that began at sunset Monday. It celebrates the liberation of the Jewish people from slavery, and their deliverance from the reign of the Egyptian Pharaohs. The Book of Exodus in the Old Testament describes Moses and his trials leading his people to the promised land of milk and honey.

Leadership is the first law of politics. The law says the exercise of responsibility and authority is going to take place. Leadership can be assigned by God -- Moses serves as a heroic example -- or by other means. In any event leaders emerge.

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Columnists

Justin Trudeau's f-bomb and authenticity in politics

Photo: Justin Trudeau/flickr

There's much to learn from Justin Trudeau's brief moment of obscenity at a charity boxing gala last weekend.

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The wizardry of Harry Potter highlights magic of social justice organizing

Photo: flickr/Eli Christman

You can change the social justice conversation. Chip in to rabble's donation drive today!

Organized groups are the force behind activism. In the final installment of Harry Potter lessons in social justice organizing, Chris Crass explores what we can learn from Dumbledore’s army.

 Dumbledore’s Army and the role of organization

As members of Dumbledore’s Army trained during one of their underground Defense Against the Dark Arts classes, Harry boldly declared, "Every great wizard in history has started out as nothing more then what we are now: students. If they can do it, why not us?"

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Columnists

Justin Trudeau and why political leadership doesn't matter

Photo: Adam Scotti/Justin Trudeau/Flickr

Just how embarrassing is it that Justin Trudeau is about to become leader of Canada's formerly dominant political party? He's been reproached for having a "thin resumé" beyond his family pedigree. Tom Axworthy, who worked for Justin's dad, laments the general absence of big ideas and "thinkers" like those summoned by Liberals to Kingston back in 1960 to "discuss the great issues of the day." From that fount came great policies like medicare. Or maybe not.

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Columnists

Outsiders form the majority in politics of inclusion

Photo: Ontario Chamber of Commerce/Flickr

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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| March 27, 2012
Photo: David P. Ball
| March 27, 2012
| March 24, 2012
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