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Restorative justice 101: Thinking about Dalhousie

Photo: Flickr/Partha S Sahana
What does restorative justice actually mean and how will it help with the Dalhousie Dental scandal?

Related rabble.ca story:

Because Dalhousie: A closer look at restorative justice

Photo: Flickr/Partha S Sahana

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Restorative justice is one of those terms that manages to evoke without explaining. 

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Canada in breach of human rights obligations in Omar Khadr case

Photo: http://winnipegpeacealliance.ca

On May 21-22, 2012, the United Nations Committee against Torture will review Canada's failure to comply with its obligations under the Convention against Torture to prevent, punish and remedy the torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment of Canadian Omar Khadr during his ongoing detention at Guantánamo prison.

In a report to the Committee against Torture, Lawyers' Rights Watch Canada (LRWC) and the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (CLMG) state that Canada was both a direct participant and indirectly complicit in the torture and other cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment of Mr. Khadr by his U.S. captors.

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

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| April 6, 2012
| September 21, 2011
Stark Raven: Prison Justice

Prisoners and their families face bureaucratic nightmare behind bars

November 10, 2010
| Dawn has learned first hand of the arbitrary nature and lack of due process inside the prison walls. She isn't afraid to speak out about the injustices her husband is facing behind bars.
Length: 19:53
Maker Culture

Episode Eleven - What's Next for makerculture?

March 26, 2010
| What will stop Maker Culture from hitting the mainstream?
Length: 23:11

Activist challenges Law Society's new control over paralegals

Harry Kopyto, well-known legal activist, is back fighting the Law Society of Upper Canada (LSUC), this time over the lawyer-controlled Society's newly acquired powers to regulate the paralegal profession.

Building on a swell of support for better regulation of the paralegal profession, the Ontario government passed the Access to Justice Act, 2006 (also known as Bill 14). The Act grants the Law Society -- a body comprised of lawyers traditionally tasked with governing themselves -- the formal authority for licensing paralegals. It also limits the scope of legal activities a paralegal can engage in, such as barring them from Family Court proceedings, and preventing them from doing a range of tasks related to real estate work, wills, and undefended divorces.

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Columnists

Proposed laws have activists doing more math

Attending protests may have more serious consequences for activists if proposed changes to the Identification of Criminals and the sentencing provisions in the Criminal Code are passed by the current government.

 

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We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

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| October 20, 2009
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